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Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
Chapter 8: The Art of Directing
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Chapter 8: The Art of Directing

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  • 1. Chapter 8Chapter 8 The Art of DirectingThe Art of Directing
  • 2. The Birth of DirectorsThe Birth of Directors  The word director comes from the Greek didaskalos, or teacher.  The playwright or lead actor as director.  The actor-manager of the 19th century.
  • 3. The Birth of DirectorsThe Birth of Directors George II, the Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (1826-1914)George II, the Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (1826-1914) • Credited as first modern director.Credited as first modern director. • His wealth allowed him to construct his own theatreHis wealth allowed him to construct his own theatre and organize a resident company of actors and artists.and organize a resident company of actors and artists. • Long rehearsal periods and attention to detail in acting.Long rehearsal periods and attention to detail in acting. • Advocated historical accuracy.Advocated historical accuracy. • Stanislavsky was so impressed that he used many ofStanislavsky was so impressed that he used many of the Duke’s techniques with the Moscow Art Theatre.the Duke’s techniques with the Moscow Art Theatre.
  • 4. Before Rehearsals BeginBefore Rehearsals Begin Script analysis  Works with the playwright (if available).Works with the playwright (if available).  Spends countless hours rereading the script.Spends countless hours rereading the script.  Combing newspaper archives, and researching theCombing newspaper archives, and researching the history and criticism of the play.history and criticism of the play.  Might work with a Dramaturg, who assists the Director in researching and thinking about the play, the playwright, the audience, and questions of style.
  • 5. Before Rehearsals BeginBefore Rehearsals Begin Structural AnalysisStructural Analysis ThemeTheme CharactersCharacters LanguageLanguage PlotPlot French scenes Beats Michael Brosilow/The Goodman Theatre
  • 6. Realizing the Production ConceptRealizing the Production Concept  Production Concept  The primary metaphor, symbol, or concept that is essential to the production of this play  Production meetings serve to bring the production team a central point in the collaborative process ©P.Switzer
  • 7. Casting the Right ActorsCasting the Right Actors Casting Cast to type Cast against type Gender-neutral casting Cross-gender casting Color-blind casting JoanMarcus
  • 8. The Director’s Role During RehearsalsThe Director’s Role During Rehearsals Blocking Shared focusShared focus ProfileProfile Stealing focusStealing focus Stage areasStage areas TriangulationTriangulation AP Photo/Jerome Delay
  • 9. The Director’s Role DuringThe Director’s Role During RehearsalsRehearsals PicturizationPicturization ©2013CengageLearning
  • 10. The Director’s Role During RehearsalsThe Director’s Role During Rehearsals Notice how every seated actors’ focus isNotice how every seated actors’ focus is on the actor standing. The director ison the actor standing. The director is utilizing level, gaze and contrast to drawutilizing level, gaze and contrast to draw the audience’s eye.the audience’s eye. UniversityofWyomingArchives
  • 11. The Director’s Role During RehearsalsThe Director’s Role During Rehearsals Can you see how the director is usingCan you see how the director is using triangulation with the blocking?triangulation with the blocking? UniversityofWyomingArchives
  • 12. Types of DirectorsTypes of Directors Interpretive directors attempt to translate the play from the page to the stage as accurately as possible. Michael Brasilow/The Goodman Theatre
  • 13. Types of DirectorsTypes of Directors Creative DirectorsCreative Directors create “conceptcreate “concept productions” basedproductions” based on their unique ideason their unique ideas or interpretations ofor interpretations of a play script.a play script. KrystaFicca/MickiPanttaja
  • 14. Contemporary TrendsContemporary Trends Directors, designers and actors work withDirectors, designers and actors work with playwrights in the development of a play from itsplaywrights in the development of a play from its very conception.very conception. RichardFeldman
  • 15. Curtain CallCurtain Call The Director: • Takes his/her artistic vision and turns the printed scriptTakes his/her artistic vision and turns the printed script into a production.into a production. • Coordinates dozens of theatre artists, technicians, andCoordinates dozens of theatre artists, technicians, and other personnel to work toward that vision.other personnel to work toward that vision. • Represents the audience by deciding exactly what theRepresents the audience by deciding exactly what the audience will see.audience will see. • Synthesizes the work of the playwright, the designers,Synthesizes the work of the playwright, the designers, and the performers into a unique theatrical event.and the performers into a unique theatrical event.

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