Teaching in the Cloud <ul><li>AAPT 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Rudy Garns | Northern Kentucky University </li></ul>
Cloud Computing  | Web 2.0 | Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet ap...
Cloud Computing  |  Web 2.0  | Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet ...
Cloud Computing | Web 2.0 |  Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet ap...
<ul><li>encourages student-faculty   interaction </li></ul><ul><li>encourages   cooperation   among students </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>encourages student-faculty  interaction </li></ul><ul><li>encourages  cooperation  among students </li></ul><ul><l...
It's the opposite of project-oriented collaboration tools that places people into groups. Social software  supports the de...
<ul><li>giving and receiving rapid  feedback and critique </li></ul><ul><li>stimulating  creativity </li></ul><ul><li>faci...
Social Learning ...one of the strongest determinants of students’ success in higher education—more important than the deta...
Social Learning Hughes, A [JISC]  (2009) ‘ Higher Education in a Web 2.0 world’   JISC [online]. A  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/...
HNR 101 Clones, Drones and Cyborgs <ul><li>Suite of social software found in the cloud </li></ul><ul><li>Maximize informat...
Netvibes <ul><li>Final Project:  Create a policy recommendation on a controversial technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Staged wo...
<ul><li>Create a class bookmark page </li></ul><ul><li>Feed widget for class site </li></ul><ul><li>Networking </li></ul><...
Thank You Contact me:  [email_address] Diigo : diigo.com Netvibes : netvibes.com Twitter : twitter.com HNR 101 :  www.rudy...
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Aapt 2010

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  • Easy picture: your browser is your desktop; applications, files, documents--perhaps even the operating system--are all in the cloud, out on the internet NIST defines cloud computing as: ...a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models. 5 Cloud computing from the IT perspective and from the pedagogy perspective. From the IT perspective: Easy to install and maintain; Resource pooling, e.g., storage, workflow, application, data; elasticity and flexibility; Easily scaled to meet user demands; (Cloud Computing Explained, Educause) In its broadest usage, the term cloud computing refers to the delivery of scalable IT resources over the Internet, as opposed to hosting and operating those resources locally, such as on a college or university network. Those resources can include applications and services, as well as the infrastructure on which they operate. By deploying IT infrastructure and services over the network, an organization can purchase these resources on an as-needed basis and avoid the capital costs of software and hardware. With cloud computing, IT capacity can be adjusted quickly and easily to accommodate changes in demand. While remotely hosted, managed services have long been a part of the IT landscape, a heightened interest in cloud computing is being fueled by ubiquitous networks, maturing standards, the rise of hardware and software virtualization, and the push to make IT costs variable and transparent. Cloud services might facilitate inter-institutional collaboration because they are more easily accessed by students and faculty at disparate institutions. In addition, despite the potential security risks posed by cloud services, some would argue that cloud services offer more security than on-campus solutions, given the complexity of mounting an effective IT security effort at the institutional level. (http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EST0902.pdf)
  • Architecture of Participation : User-generated content: Users aren’t just consumers but producers; shift from having a web page to posting/publishing on a blog Collective intelligence : Sharing content (music, images, videos, files, software); User-generated filtering; Collaborative working with feedback, co-production; The content is the product of user/group creation and ranking and distribution and marketing Folksonomy : free structured approach to classification; users assign their own labels; convergence to common meanings Syndication : Information can find us; Compare with journals, magazines and cable TV: you subscribe to the content you want; RSS feeds; look for orange icon; Firefox 3 provides site info including feed info; Feedburner lets you create RSS feeds | Many readers or aggregators: Google Reader is nice RIA : The Web browser serves as the desktop; User-generated desktop: Widgets, Embed scripts, drag-n-drop, browser add-ons; Less about buying and installing a new version of software; Some hallmarks of the Web 2.0 period of technological transformation: sharing, finding others with similar interests, classification through tagging, more bottom-up (and egalitarian) organization and participation The social aspect was there with the www and email; it’s the drive toward semantic interactions that makes the internet look increasingly social (actually it’s co-evolution); semantic interactions (norms) are social Web 2.0 is the network as platform , spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an &amp;quot; architecture of participation ,&amp;quot; and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences . ( OReilly, Tim. “What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software.” Communications and Strategies 65 (2007): 17-37.)
  • Building community is important whether we are teaching a completely online course with no face time, or a classroom course. We already know about the value of learning communities, having students introduce themselves, small groups assignments, open class discussions, class presentations. New technologies facilitate these opportunities, providing new vehicles or media. -- generates excitement and interest in learning -- creates an infrastructure for learning shared questions, shared methods, opportunities for critique and feedback -- provides opportunities to cultivate social skills involved in knowledge acquisition, evaluation and distribution Students are social and learn effectively in group endeavors; students gain from teaching each other, sharing questions, examples, methods; learn valuable skills of critique and evaluation; Students already accomplished socially in their niche, but need to have social skills honed for research and learning; how to collaborate and cooperate to accomplish goals;how to interact critically to be effective and sustain good reputation and working relationships There is some debate over when social software first emerges or what it requires. It could include email, listservs and Usenet. Online communities could be one-to-one (email and IM), one-to-many (web pages and blogs) and manyy-to-many (wikis). Interaction could by synchronous or asynchronous. It both depends on and produces (new) social conventions; it seems to differ from group ware in that it is a bottom-up process (users aren’t assigned roles and responsibilities by authority). Common elements include sharing, collaboration, tagging, communication.
  • The American Association for Higher Education Bulletin, March 1987. The &amp;quot;seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education,&amp;quot; originally framed by Arthur Chickering and Zelda Gamson in 1986, is a concise summary of decades of educational research findings about the kinds of teaching/learning activities most likely to improve learning outcomes should apply easily to philosophy classes: critical and reflective philosophical thought and discourse Learning that is active – by doing – undertaken within a community and based on individual’s interests , is widely considered to be the most effective. Driven by process rather than content, such an approach helps students become self-directed and independent learners . Web 2.0 is well suited to serving and supporting this type of learning.
  • * Chickering and Ehrmann discuss ways to use technology to implement the 7 principles * Then is technology appropriate and when is it not “ Any given instructional strategy can be supported by a number of contrasting technologies (old and new), just as any given technology might support different instructional strategies. But for any given instructional strategy, some technologies are better than others: Better to turn a screw with a screwdriver than a hammer — a dime may also do the trick, but a screwdriver is usually better.” Arthur W. Chickering and Stephen C. Ehrmann IMPLEMENTING THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES: Technology as Lever
  • In the broadest sense any software that involves communication of ideas could be considered social software. Getting more specific, generally accepted definitions of social software focus on those that address the desire of individuals to be pulled into groups to achieve goals and feature support for conversational interaction between individuals or groups, support for social feedback, and/or support for social networks. (Boyd, 2003) While the initial focus of e-learning was on the technology that drove it, new social software tools are being adapted from those used by teens and business people to keep in touch and collaborate. (Kaplan-Leiserson, 2003) Although the full gamut of social software is still not used extensively in an educational context, educators and students alike are beginning to recognize the benefits that include: giving and receiving rapid feedback and critique (Longhurst &amp; Sandage, 2004), stimulating creativity (Weller, 2003), facilitating collaborative study (Lunsford &amp; Bruce, 2001), providing a real audience for student work (Kennedy, 2003), fostering the development of critical thinking skills (Oravec, 2003), establishing a platform for academic discourse (Wrede, 2003) and improving more mundane situations like time conflicts, remote access or location considerations. (Dabbagh, 2002)
  • Aapt 2010

    1. 1. Teaching in the Cloud <ul><li>AAPT 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Rudy Garns | Northern Kentucky University </li></ul>
    2. 2. Cloud Computing | Web 2.0 | Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet apps OReilly, Tim. “What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software.” Communications and Strategies 65 (2007): 17-37. Delivery of scalable IT resources over the internet Outsource installation, maintenance, storage Easy to use, reliable, configurable, connected Issues of privacy and security EDUCAUSE, “7 Things You Should Know About Cloud Computing” (2009). http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EST0902.pdf Building Community through Communication, Collaboration and Cooperation 7 Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education
    3. 3. Cloud Computing | Web 2.0 | Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet apps OReilly, Tim. “What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software.” Communications and Strategies 65 (2007): 17-37. Delivery of scalable IT resources over the internet Outsource installation, maintenance, storage Easy to use, reliable, configurable, connected Issues of privacy and security EDUCAUSE, “7 Things You Should Know About Cloud Computing” (2009). http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EST0902.pdf Building Community through Communication, Collaboration and Cooperation 7 Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education
    4. 4. Cloud Computing | Web 2.0 | Social Software Participation Collective intelligence Syndication Folksonomy Rich internet apps OReilly, Tim. “What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software.” Communications and Strategies 65 (2007): 17-37. Delivery of scalable IT resources over the internet Outsource installation, maintenance, storage Easy to use, reliable, configurable, connected Issues of privacy and security EDUCAUSE, “7 Things You Should Know About Cloud Computing” (2009). http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EST0902.pdf Building Community through Communication, Collaboration and Cooperation 7 Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education
    5. 5. <ul><li>encourages student-faculty interaction </li></ul><ul><li>encourages cooperation among students </li></ul><ul><li>encourages active learning </li></ul><ul><li>gives prompt feedback </li></ul><ul><li>emphasizes time on task </li></ul><ul><li>communicates high expectations </li></ul><ul><li>respect diverse talents and ways of learning </li></ul>7 principles of good practice in undergraduate education Good Practice March 1987 AAHE Bulletin, Chickering and Gamson
    6. 6. <ul><li>encourages student-faculty interaction </li></ul><ul><li>encourages cooperation among students </li></ul><ul><li>encourages active learning </li></ul><ul><li>gives prompt feedback </li></ul><ul><li>emphasizes time on task </li></ul><ul><li>communicates high expectations </li></ul><ul><li>respect diverse talents and ways of learning </li></ul>March 1987 AAHE Bulletin, Chickering and Gamson
    7. 7. It's the opposite of project-oriented collaboration tools that places people into groups. Social software supports the desire of individuals to be pulled into groups to achieve goals. — Stowe Boyd Software that supports group interaction — Clay Shirky Social Software
    8. 8. <ul><li>giving and receiving rapid feedback and critique </li></ul><ul><li>stimulating creativity </li></ul><ul><li>facilitating collaborative study </li></ul><ul><li>providing a real audience for student work </li></ul><ul><li>fostering the development of critical thinking skills </li></ul><ul><li>establishing a platform for academic discourse </li></ul><ul><li>improving more mundane situations like time conflicts, remote access or location considerations. </li></ul>Benefits Susan Connell, Literature Review: Uses for Social Software in Education (2004) http://soozzone.com/690review.htm
    9. 9. Social Learning ...one of the strongest determinants of students’ success in higher education—more important than the details of their instructors’ teaching styles—was their ability to form or participate in small study groups . Students who studied in groups, even only once a week, were more engaged in their studies, were better prepared for class, and learned significantly more than students who worked on their own. Seely Brown and Adler summarizing the work of Richard J. Light, of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, in Seely Brown, J. & Adler, R (2008) ‘Minds on fire: Open Education, the long tail and Learning 2.0’ Educause Review [online] Vol.43 (1). http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/ERVolume432008/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume43/162418
    10. 10. Social Learning Hughes, A [JISC] (2009) ‘ Higher Education in a Web 2.0 world’ JISC [online]. A http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/generalpublications/2009/heweb2.aspx Learning that is active – by doing – undertaken within a community and based on individual’s interests , is widely considered to be the most effective. Driven by process rather than content, such an approach helps students become self-directed and independent learners . Web 2.0 is well suited to serving and supporting this type of learning.
    11. 11. HNR 101 Clones, Drones and Cyborgs <ul><li>Suite of social software found in the cloud </li></ul><ul><li>Maximize information and opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize management; avoid overload </li></ul><ul><li>Site built on Dokuwiki hosted off campus </li></ul><ul><li>Feed widget from Twitter #garns101 </li></ul><ul><li>YouTube playlist for the class </li></ul><ul><li>Embed class activities calendar from Google </li></ul><ul><li>Diigo bookmarking feed from class group page </li></ul><ul><li>Blog plugin for Dokuwiki </li></ul><ul><li>Netvibes for final project assembly and presentation </li></ul>
    12. 12. Netvibes <ul><li>Final Project: Create a policy recommendation on a controversial technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Staged work: Proposal, background, pro/con, bibliography, recommendation, digital media project. </li></ul><ul><li>Netvibes: Assembly, Feedback, Final Presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Use widgets to display text, images, video, RSS feeds, links </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts: Follow each other’s pages </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Create a class bookmark page </li></ul><ul><li>Feed widget for class site </li></ul><ul><li>Networking </li></ul><ul><li>Annotation as prompt or as feedback </li></ul>
    14. 14. Thank You Contact me: [email_address] Diigo : diigo.com Netvibes : netvibes.com Twitter : twitter.com HNR 101 : www.rudygarns.com/class/HNR101 This presentation will be available at www.slideshare.net/garns/aapt- 2010 Links to articles and example s can be found at Technologies for Teaching and Learning: ttl.rudygarns.com

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