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    Revival of a dying art Revival of a dying art Document Transcript

    • KERLA MURALSRevival of a dying artMy origin is vague,but my history is rich;From the forgotten walls,trying to make a switch;Into the lives of people,with a solid bridge.
    • Preface
    • T he region of Kerala posses a major artistic tradition, but one which has received very less acknowledgement than it deserves. This is particularly true of the painting produced there, partly becauseof the absence of appropriate documentation and publication of the basicmaterials and possibly due to the seemingly overwhelming complexity ofwhat has survived. Photography of mural paintings is always a challeng-ing task, and reproductions of Kerala art, particularly in monotone, areoften visually illegible. Kerala is one of the few regions in India having a good collection ofarchaeologically important mural sites. The unique architectural style ofKerala had a tremendous influence in the evolution of mural tradition. Themurals are noted for their linear accuracy, extensive ornamentation andfine representation of emotions. This project was done with the intention of studying the Kerala muralsand coming up with ways for generating awareness about the art amongthe people. We looked into the reasons for the decline of this once popularart and have made suggestions as to how to lift it to its former glory. The Research objective: Awareness about the existence and attributes of the Kerala mural paintings needs to be developed among the people. Taking into consideration the chang- ing taste of the national and international consumers the art can be modified to have a contemporary style. The aim of the project was to product diversification by the amalgamation of his- toric art, handlooms and handicrafts with modern outlook.
    • Methodology
    • H istorical research regarding the origin, background, techniques used and expressions provided in the paintings was conducted by going to the sites where the mural paintings are present. Thetwo mural painting institutes i.e. Guruvayur Institute of Mural Paintingand Sri Shankracharya University of Sanskrit, Kalady were visited for thesame. Study of the market to understand the current scenario regardingavailability and pricing was done via personal interactions with thetargeted consumer group. Questionnaires were prepared for the samewhich were employed for collecting the data from online services as well.Various survey sites were researched for the same. A survey was conducted for getting fair idea regarding perception ofIndian consumer regarding the handicrafts and the analysis was used todevelop the strategies and product diversifications mentioned in thereport later.
    • Acknowledgment
    • A ny accomplishment requires the effort of many people and there are no exceptions. We would like to take this opportunity to express our gratitude to all those who helped us in the successful comple-tion of this Research Project. We want to thank the National Institute of Design, R&D Campus, Banga-lore for giving us permission to commence this Research Project in thefirst instance, to do the necessary research work and to use departmentaldata. We want to express our gratitude to MR. K U. Krishnakumar, Principal ofGuruvayur Institute for Mural Paintings, and Mr. Babu Namboothari, Headof Department of Painting at Sree Sankaracharya University of Sanskrit,Kalady for letting us visit their institutes and providing us with all the re-quired information. Special thanks goes to Mr. Pratheesh for his help andvaluable suggestions. The co-operation is much appreciated. We are deeply indebted to our course in-charge Dr. Baral, whose help,stimulating suggestions and couragement helped us throughout the Re-search Project. We would also like to thank our Course Coordinator, Mr. C.S. Susanth for his help and support.
    • 24 FrameworkContents 26 28 30 Subject Style Uniqueness 14 Unfolding 16 Introduction 18 Prominent sites 20 Origin and Evolution
    • 48 Panaroma 50 Revival of the tradition 52 Current scenario34 Blueprint 56 New Dimensions 36 Colours and techniques 58 Market Study 40 Preparation of Wall 60 Proposed Strategies 42 Preparation of Pigment 62 Product Diversification 44 Preparation of Brush 46 Drawing and Painting
    • UNFOLDING
    • Introduction16 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • “ The Kerala School of painting represents the last and fading phase of Indian Mural ” painting tradition.K erala, the southernmost state in India, is blessed with the glory of an architectural lineage and cultural heritage. Among theStates of India, Kerala has a pride of her own infostering the art of paintings of old, and has toher credit excellent murals and frescos commonlyknown as Kerala Murals. The Kerala School of paint-ing represents the last and fading phase of IndianMural painting tradition. Quantitatively Kerala hasthe second largest number of important Mural Sites. The cave pictures of prehistoric times in Edakkal Cavesin Wayanad, Ezhuthalai Caves in Idukki, Pandavapara inThiruvananthapuram are the precursors of Kerala Murals.Simplicity of subjects, thematic presentation, technicalexcellence, bold and delicate strokes, bright and beautifulcolours, idealistic reproduction of human beings, animalsand trees are some of the important characteristics ofKerala mural paintings. This glory can be seen at its best innearly two hundred temples, palaces and churches. Theme: Palazhi Madhanam Acrylic on Canvas, 22’x8’ 17 Unfolding
    • Prominent Sites 1. Ayyappankavu Shasta Temple 2. Balusserikota Vetakorappan Temple 3. Ettumanur Shiva Temple 4. Kaliamballi Devi Temple 5. Attingal Krishnasvami Temple 6. Kotakkal Venkatadeva Temple 7. Krishnapuram Palace, Kayamkulam 8. Mattancheri Dutch Palace, Cochin 9. Madavanteshvara Ananthapuram Temple, Kasergode 10. Panayannarkavu Devi And Shiva Temple 11. Pa N Davath Shasta Temple 12. Pundarikapuram Vishnu Temple 13. Payyanoor Subramanya Temple 14. Padmanabhapuram Palace 15. Pisharikavu Devi Temple 16. Purameri Vetakorappan Temple 17. Triparayar Rama Temple 18. Th1runandikkara Cave Temple 19. Trikotithanam Vishnu Temple 20. Tali Temple, Calicut 21. Thiruvanchikulam Shiva Temple 22. Tali Temple Near Cheruturuti 23. Thirumandham Kunnu Devi Temple 24. Trichambaram Krishna Temple 25. Taliparambu Shiva Temple 26. Trichur Vadakkunath Temple 27. Vaikom Shiva Temple 28. Todikalam Shiva Temple 29. Cheriapalli Church, Kottayam 30. Mar Sabor Afroth Jacobite 31. Syrian Church, Angamali 32. St. Mary’s Jacobite Syrian Church, Angamali18 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • ChurcheTemplePalace 19 Unfolding
    • Origin and Evolution20 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • W hen the history of mural paintings of India is studied the evolution of it from Ajantha to Kerala is a path of enquiry trodden by many scholars. The Buddist themes of Ajantha paintings considered tohave been executed between the 2nd Century BC and the 5th / 6th Century ADgot changed thematically and stylistically during different periods of time. Thestages of Mural paintings seen at different periods can be roughly be locatedat places such as Sittannavasal, Badami, Thanjavur, Vijayanagara and Kerala toname a few in South India. The styles of Sittannavasal and Lepakshi and that ofKerala show a lot of correspondence. It is considered to be tions of their wooden proto-very rich in mural painting, type. It was a period of greatperhaps second only to literary movement born outRajasthan in India and most of the new Bhakthi cult andof the Kerala Murals are there are enough materialdated between the 16th / (Archeological and literary)17th and 19th Century A.D. to reconstruct the pictureTemples, palaces, churches of the late phase of the artare decorated with muralpaintings. Though very fewdocumentary evidences are activities in Mural painting. With the incoming of Bhakti movement, a number of “ Forms in murals, stone and metal sculptures werethere to date accurately the temples sprang up witharchitecture of Kerala, sty- murals and woodcarvings in indeed virtuallistically many scholars have various temples on themes imitations of theirdivided it into three phases.The temple architecture hasbeen divided into: like the Puranas, Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Though the late phase- wooden prototype. ” saw great literary movementearly (800 – 1000) AD, sufficient materials andMiddle (1000 – 1300)AD details regarding mural tra-Late (1300 – 1800) AD. dition are not recorded. In the last phase with theincorporation of other formsof visual arts like woodcarvings, sculptures andpaintings on temple walls,a balance has been forgedbetween Kerala architectureand decorative art. It wasmainly a period of woodenarchitecture and woodsculptures. Forms in murals,stone and metal sculptures Theme: Lord Shivawere indeed virtual imita- Natural dyes 21 Unfolding
    • The mural tradition of Kerala is generally divided into three phases and they are compiled as follows: Early phase can be seen Middle phase in Mat- Late phase can be seen in Thirunandikkara, Kandal- tancheri palace, Vadakkum- in Mattanchaeri palace, lur and Padmanabhaswami natha temple, Thiruvanchik- Padmanabhapuram palace, Temple. kulam, Elamkunnappuzha. Kottakkal, Pundareekapu- ram, Thriprayar, Panayan- narakkavu and many other palaces. Subjects taken out straight from the Puranas or Rama- yana or Mahabharata are illustrated highly stylistically and brilliantly. It brings out a certain depth of human feelings of passion and spiritual endeavor. In conception and compo- sition, the murals have attained its highest artistic excel- lence. The dignified poise of the figures with expression of the faces that is so graceful yet dynamic is an important feature in a Kerala Mural. Every character appears to have their own charm from the beautiful and graceful figures of Gods to the devouring demon. Even a demon in an act of destruction spells out charm and whose activity is ap- preciated and admired thus displaying an artistic skill and brilliance.The great and distinctive art displayed in these paintings reveal a wonderful vitality and intensity of feel- ing, meditative charm, divine majesty, decorative delicacy, unique verisimilitude, subtle charm of colour, fine texture and marvelous draughtsmanship. Both male and female figures are heavily jeweled and beaded. The colours are bright and vibrant. “ Even a demon in an act of destruction spells out charm and whose activity is appreciated and Replica of admired thus displaying an artistic ” Vetakorappan Natural dyes skill and brilliance.22 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 15 century AD Kaliamballi TempleLate15 century AD Trikotithanam TempleEarly16 Thiruvanchikullam Mattancheri Dutch century Shiva Temple Palace Triparaya Rama Temple AD Phase 1 Phase 2Late16 century AD Panayannarkavu Devi Temple Todikalam Shiva TempleEarly17 century AD Pisharkavi Devi Temple17 Thiruvanchikulam Balusserikota century Shiva Temple Vetakorappan Pundarikapuram Vishnu Temple AD Phase 2 Temple18 Mattancheri Dutch century Padmanabhapuram Pandavath Shasta Temple AD Palace Temple Phase 319 Panjal Kotakkal century Ayyappankavu Vankatadeva Temple Temple AD 23 Unfolding
    • FRAMEWORK
    • Subject Scene from Ramayan26 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • U nlike other parts of India including Tamilakam that witnessed the con- flict between Vaishnava and Shaiva cults, Kerala had an amalgamation of these two in the figure Hari – Hara, which became a conspicuoustheme for mural painting. Sastha, another god considered to be the son of Sivaand Vishnu who impersonated the female form Mohini also shows the fruit of theunion of diverse cults. Apart from the Dasa- from the seventeenth and of its entrance a battlevathara figures of Vishnu, eighteenth centuries and scene between the armiesGajendramoksha, Poothan- Krishnapuram Palace at of Tipu Sultan and of theamokshaKaliyamardhanam, Kayamkulam has a large English East India Company.Krishna stealing the cloths panel of Gajendramoksham It is also apparent that theof Gopis are very frequently from the first half of the history of Kerala Murals hasdepicted. Brahma, Saras- 18th century. its origin in the temple wallswathi, Rishis, celestial and and thus a study of Kerala Panayannarkkavu Muralsmany god heads crowd up Murals is not complete are based on Hindu mythol-whenever there is a need without pondering on the ogy painted on the wallsof heavenly or divinely architecture of Kerala and of SaptaMatha temple ofdramatic atmosphere. Siva its association with Panayannarkkavu and Ettu-worshipping Vishnu and the murals. manoor Murals has scenesvice versa are not rare. from the epics along with The subjects and themes an imaginative scene of ain the murals are centered music concert by Gods andon the Hindu pantheon Goddesses. Pundareeka-of Gods and Goddesses puram Murals are variousdrawn from the description scenes from the Hinduin the invocatory verses epics and also the frolicsor DhyanaSlokas. More of Lord Krishna. It wouldcommon representations be interesting to bring intoare of Vishnu in different account the influence of theincarnations, Ganesha, mural paintings on Christi-and manifestations of anity. On various churchesSiva. We see murals like the St. George.s Ortho-in the Pallimanna Siva dox Church has ChristianTemple devoted to Siva- murals bringing out biblicalParvati’s marriage, the characters and narratingRamayana Story being stories from the scriptures. Scene fromnarrated on the walls of the Mar Sabore and Afroth Ramayan “Mattancheri Palace and Church at Akapparambu inin the SankaraNarayana, the outskirts of Ernakulam The subjects andthe Mahabharata is retold. also have murals of scenes themes in the muralsPadmanabhapuram from the bible. Interest- are centered on thePalace houses murals ingly St. Mary’s Church at Hindu pantheon of ”depicting puranic themes Kanjoor has on both sides Gods and Goddesses. 27 Framework
    • Style Palazhimadanam Natural dyes on wall28 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • “ The Kerala mural is an art primarily con- nected with human forms. ”T he 16th and 17th centuries started showing the magnificently luxurious accomplishment of pictorial grace on Kerala walls, and as in many clas- sical theatrical forms of Kerala, the visual space on walls has become al-most rule oriented warranting a clear cut pictorial language in rendering formsand themes. Gods and Goddesses do not have any mortal world of backgroundor environment, but totally are enraptured in ethereal ecstasy of delight; the art-ist would not behold any celestial or mythical being in common circumstances,nor the devotees would have accepted it. Kerala Mural Painting with intricate details, seem more symbolic and graphictradition strictly follows the to have some relation to manner. There is hardly anyPanchavarna principle (Five Chalukya and Hoysala art. depth shown by means ofcolours) in colour render- While there are repetitions perspectival background.ing, which can be seen in of images, their variety is so In the early phase ofother art forms of Kerala large that their understand- Kerala paintings, naturealso. White, Yellow, Red, ing requires a specialized was totally subordinatedGreen and Black are the five study of the iconography. to the decorative elementscolours. There is no logic of move- of ornamentation. Only in ment in the narration of the last phase do we find a The mural artists rarely stories. Sometimes it moves clumsy effort to incorporateleft any breathing space for horizontally, sometimes nature in the manner ofthe innumerable gods and vertically, and sometimes miniature schools of northgoddesses (as apparent in the it overlaps with stories and India and colonial paint-image on the left), emphatical- themes totally unrelated to ings as at Pundarikapttramly asserting their existence each other. and the later paintings ofon the crowded surface of Nlattancheri. Elements ofthe wall. Kerala painters The Kerala mural is an nature are generally highlydivided space into various art primarily connected stylized and woven into theunits of shapes and sizes so with human forms. Unlike main fabric of the paintings.as to create a visual luxuri- the importance given by Only on close observationance on the temple walls in the schools of miniature can one notice these detailsstark contrast to the sim- paintings to nature, Kerala which are recorded in anplicity of architecture. The artists treated nature with almost incidental manner.exuberance of forms, filled its flora and fauna in a 29 Framework
    • Uniqueness Mudiyette: classical dance drama Natural dyes on wall30 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • I n the visual history of Kerala, mural painting has been the predominant form of expression from the ninth until middle of the nineteenth century at least as far as surviving remains are concerned. Neither miniature normanuscript illustrations seem to have been prevalent to this extent. This is butnatural because the extremely humid conditions in this area did not allow per-manency to any other medium. Thus, wall paintings along with wood carvingsbecame the chief ingredients for embellishment of temples.PROPORTION PERSPECTIVE Kerala mural artists used Kerala murals haveproportions depending attempted to show only “on the canon and a larger an overall distribution offormat for divine icons; the objects like human figures, The Kerala mural isother persons were relegat- trees etc without ever an art primarily con-ed to secondary areas. This attempting to create any nected with humanis to be seen in representa-tion of local kings, patrons,village folk, hunters and sense of receding space. This marks the true char- acter of wall paintings that forms. ”everyday life. was inherited from the clas- sical tradition. The paint- ings do not create any real pretence of depth, retaining the essentially two- dimen- sional character of the wall on which they are painted. Radha and Krishna Natural dyes on canvas 31 Framework
    • COLOR SPACE In the usage of colour Pictorial space must have consisted of many small and also Kerala murals stand large units and was set out on a grid similar to a graph apart from other Indian art paper. The motifs were drawn within this unit in different traditions. The artists here proportions according to iconic tradition. The remaining seem to have given more areas were almost always flattened out into a geometrical importance to the distribu- design which served to interlace the pictorial components tion of heraldic colours that of one panel with another thus uniting the entire painted create psychedelic vibra- wall surface. This feature and the geometrical patterns are tions. Intense and strong not commonly found outside Kerala. The designs them- colours are juxtaposed in selves, very similar to woven textile patterns, also show such a way that they appear that the geometrical division was a preliminary structural almost like a huge coloured marking on the wall surface. tapestry hung close to the The modelling has no reference to nature except to wall. The use of colour in create the feel of roundness akin to the wood carvings, its full vigour and richness another vital tradition of Kerala which is closely related to has no parallel in any other the paintings. style of Indian art. There are female forms painted CONTENT in greens that remind one of the soft silky greenness The Kerala mural is an art primarily connected with of the palm sheaths, lush human forms. Hence, nature with its flora and fauna is green of the foliage or the confined to just a few areas of the picture. Unlike the yellowish green of the ripe importance given by the schools of miniature paintings mango fruit. Here colour is to nature, Kerala artists treated it in a more symbolic and not merely a symbol as in graphic manner. In the early phase of Kerala paintings, the blue of Krishna or the nature was totally subordinated to the decorative elements black of Kali, but a way of of ornamentation. identifying the tactile sensa- tion of objects in nature, rendering tremendous sen- suality to the paintings. “ The designs them- selves, very similar to woven textile patterns, also show that the geo- metrical division was a preliminary struc- tural marking on the32 wall surface. ” Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • GitaupadeshNatural dyes onwall 33 Framework
    • NEWDIMENSIONS
    • Market Study58 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • Assumption We started the project with the assumption that very fewpeople know about the existence of Kerala Mural paintings.Target group General Public: Medium income group within the agegroup of 25-40. They have the means at their disposal andare willing to explore into unventured categories. They wantto make a style statement. Designers: They have the ability to influence the society.Data collection We collected all the information that we could via vari-ous sources. The first stage involved collecting data from thebooks(Handmade in India, Indian Crafts and Portrait ofKerala) available in the Library. We also collected informa-tion regarding Kerala murals from internet. The second stage consisted of making a questionnaireand sending it to the target group via E-mail, using servicesites. We also had personal interviews with thetarget users. 59 New Dimensions
    • SURVEY CONDUCTED Analysis: Rs. 500-700- 17 Ques: Would you consider it as an Rs.1000-2000- 67 investment (assume the painting (all results are in percentage) Rs. 2000-3000- 16 is done by a famous artist and is Ques: Have you ever bought any Ques: Are you partial towards based on a favourable theme)? traditional Indian Painting? any particular theme i.e. historic Analysis: Yes- 83 Analysis: Yes- 67 themes depicting Shiva or Vishnu No- 17 No- 33 etc? Would you reconsider your Ques: Do you think: Ques: Are you aware of the Kerala decision while buying based on Analysis: Art should be approach- murals? the above? able, accessible and affordable.- Analysis: Yes- 27 Analysis: Yes-70 55 No- 73 No- 30 Art should be exclusive.- 45 Ques: Have you ever bought a Ques: What size of painting would Ques: Have you seen traditional Kerala mural art piece or do you you prefer buying: paintings being done on products know anyone who has? Analysis: As a souvenir- A5/A3 other than canvas? If yes, please Analysis: Yes- 42 As a gift- A4/A3 name a few. No- 58 As a priced possession- A1 Analysis: Madhubani, warli, tanjore Ques: If the mural paintings are Ques: Does the technique used painting, fresco came out to be made available, would you like to while painting matter to you? the famous arts. buy them? Analysis: Yes- 92 As per the market survey the arts Analysis: Yes- 100 No- 8 have been employed on diverse No- none Ques: What would you prefer: materials like: wood pulp, attached Ques: What price range did you/ Traditionally done painting? (natu- to cloth, sarees, bags textiles, wal- would you prefer while buying ral dyes)- 83 lets, bookmarks, glass, wardrobe. one? Contemporary style? (acrylic)- 1760 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • AnalysisFrom the study conducted, a basic understanding of the market scenario for the KeralaMural Paintings came into picture. The following observations were made: The awareness among people about the mural paintings was noticed to be poor. Thiscan be because of various reasons: Firstly, since the Kerala tourism board has not laid much emphasis on this art formeven with its rich cultural heritage. The customer needs to be educated so that he canlater develop a taste and the market can later expand. This would provide the artisansmore opportunity for explorations. Secondly, because of the unavailability of convenient sizes of the mural art pieces.Anything that is easy to carry is perceived as more adaptable. In any given home, a per-son would want to buy souveniers while visiting any new place in such cases (also, sinceKerala has the maximum international tourism among various Indian states), convinientsizes of mural art would be helpful in popularising the art form. The high price range is another reason for the art being not as famus. The higher therange, the less affordable it is and lesser number of people would be willing to buy. The paintings are not as popular because of the restricted employment of the art, it hasbeen utilised in temples, palaces and churches but has not reached the common manand has neither been developed to be perceived as being an art of common people. Therefore, art has not developed to its full potential. 61 New Dimensions
    • Proposed Strategies62 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • Assumption We started the project with the assumption that very fewpeople know about the existence of Kerala Mural paintings.Target group General Public: Medium income group within the agegroup of 25-40. They have the means at their disposal andare willing to explore into unventured categories. They wantto make a style statement. Designers: They have the ability to influence the society.Data collection We collected all the information that we could via vari-ous sources. The first stage involved collecting data from thebooks(Handmade in India, Indian Crafts and Portrait ofKerala) available in the Library. We also collected informa-tion regarding Kerala murals from internet. The second stage consisted of making a questionnaireand sending it to the target group via E-mail, using servicesites. We also had personal interviews with thetarget users. 63 New Dimensions
    • Product Diversifications64 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 65New Dimensions
    • Pens The pen with the Kerala mural becomes a part of your identity. Details: Product name: Executive pen, fountain pen Product usage: Can be used as a decorative art piece and can be used for the primary writting purpose as well. Price range: starting from Rs.350 Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes. Brand strategy: To showcase the exclusivity of the product, it can either be used as an interface by a particular compa- ny anc can be used to be provided as a complimentary gift. Also, the product can be used a mark of identity by the top officials to emphasis the financial status of the company.66 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 67New Dimensions
    • Postage stamp Kerala mural iconic painting can be used as a postage stamp. This would act not only as a promotion but can also a personalised product. Details: Product name: Postage stamp Dimensions: Print size: 3.71cm X 2.30cm Overall size: 4.06cm X 2.73cm Product usage: Can be used to increase the awareness among masses about the art. Price range: Rs. 5 Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be religious or non-religious themes. Brand strategy: To make the art popular, the product range can be kept low so that the application is more and the target can be achieved.68 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 69New Dimensions
    • Wrapping paper The detailing done in mural paintings can be used as a pattern for wrapping paper for various items. This would become exclusive and can be used as for various high end products. The ornamentation itself would add to the value of the complete package. Details: Product name: Wrapping paper Dimensions: A1 size Product usage: Can be used as a decorative art piece for wrapping various corporate gifts. Price range: starting from Rs.50 to 100 Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes. Brand strategy: To showcase the exclusivity of the product, it can either be used as an interface by a particular compa- ny anc can be used to be provided as a complimentary gift. Also, the product can be used a mark of identity. It can also be used at a personal level, it can act an exclu- sive taste and become a individuality symbol.70 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 71New Dimensions
    • Speical occasion gift box Since the themes used are God related and Shiva and Parvati are a major part of most of them, the special occa- sion cards and gift boxes can be designed to incorporate the style which would provide a personal touch as well as a status identity to the consumer. Details: Product name: Gift box Dimensions: 9 X 9 X 3.75 cm Product usage: Can be used as a decorative art piece for corporate gifts. It can be used to provide exclusive gifts such as jewellery pieces, etc. Price range: starting from Rs.200 Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme depending on the use of the gift box. Brand strategy: To showcase the exclusivity of the product, it can either be used as an interface by a particular compa- ny anc can be used to be provided as a complimentary gift. Also, the product can be used a mark of identity. It can also be used at a personal level, it can act an exclu- sive taste and become a individuality symbol. It can be used by expensive items store such as swarovski, etc, to provide products of a particular theme or for a par- ticular occasion.72 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 73New Dimensions
    • Bookmarks Small, affordable and personalised product which provides an opportunity for a wider market can be used to advertise the paintings. Details: Product name: Bookmark Dimensions: 12.5 X 3 cm Product usage: Can be used as a decorative art piece by readers. Price range: Rs.30 and above Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme depending on the book theme. Brand strategy: It can be provided to exclusive customers who are loyal to the brand as a complimentary product and can be sold as a brand identity by the large chain book- stores.74 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 75New Dimensions
    • Webpage Homepages can be developed with Kerala Mural painting themes. Since the social networking sites cover a huge ground, the homepage can help develop a wider audience and can be popularised at a much higher platform. Details: Product name: Web page Product usage: Can be used as an exclusive page by google or similar websites to popularise the art. It can be used in chat rooms to provide exclusive space as well. Price range: can be either charged or free of cost Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme with options for the user to create his or her own space as per their taste. Brand strategy: The art can be promoted by reaching a larger audience. It can also be used to provide a private experience to the customer.76 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 77New Dimensions
    • Art kit Similar to warli and madhubani, etc; the mural art can be personalised and publicised by making it generally avail- able. These ready to do kits would make it easier develop a user interest at a personal level and also encourage them to invest more in learning the art form. Details: Product name: Art kit Dimensions: 32 X 25 X 6.5 cm Product usage: Can be used by students to learn the art at home. Price range: 350 and above Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme. Brand strategy: The art can be popularised by using this kit as in case of warli and other Indian arts. Once a customer makes a particular art piece, he/she gets attached to the art form and becomes an active advertiser of the same, hence, popularising the art.78 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 79New Dimensions
    • Watches The watch is a part of the status symbol and also shows a person’s appreciation for the rich cultural heritage of Kerala. Details: Product name: Watches Print area: 3.3 cm dia Product usage: Can be used for personal purposes and can be used as a gift to exclusive people as well. Price range: 2500 and above Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme. It can be manipu- lated as per the person using the product, Brand strategy: It becomes a part of the personality and becomes a walking advertisment for popularising the art as well.80 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 81New Dimensions
    • Wallets Kerala murals used in wallets would become a style sym- bol. They would become a brand identity for Kerala itself and would help promote the art. Details: Product name: Wallet Dimensions: up to 14 X 6 X 2.5 cm Product usage: Can be used as an exclusive item by vari- ous famous brands Price range: 350 and above Proposed patterns: as showcased on the left, they can be non-religious themes or religious theme. Brand strategy: It can become a new range of products by brands such as holii etc. It becomes an exclusive item to be used by the sophisticated masses.82 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 83New Dimensions
    • Advertising using aeroplanes We started the project with the assumption that very few people know about the existence of Kerala Mural paintings.84 Kerala Murals: Revival of a Dying Art
    • 85New Dimensions