Flight Safety Part 1

2,165 views
2,047 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,165
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
227
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
89
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Flight Safety Part 1

  1. 1. Tony LicuChairman of the Conference
  2. 2. Michael ConstantinidesDeputy Chairman of FSF/SE.Europe-M.East-Cyprus
  3. 3. Catalin RaduPresident of ECAC
  4. 4. Eleni GeroudakisMinistry of Communications and Works of Cyprus
  5. 5. Tony LicuChairman of the Conference
  6. 6. Flight Safety Foundation South East Europe Conference Is there a need for coordinated contingency and emergency plans by airports, airlines and ANSPs Bucharest, 18 November 2011 OPENING REMARKSTony Licuantonio.licu@eurocontrol.intHead of SafetyDirectorate Network managerEUROCONTROL The European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation
  7. 7. All ATM disruptions are not crisis ATM/ATFCM/Aviation is made of daily disruptions • Handled with existing procedures • Manageable in a known OPS framework • Coordination and mitigation at network level is needed Critical major crisis (major network and global impact) • Out of existing contingency plans • Out of known OPS framework • Major political and media implications • Key role of network management • Need for a network crisis cell 8
  8. 8. « Eyjafjallajokul » volcano eruptionA major ATM European crisis (14-22/04/2010) 9
  9. 9. Britain 2011-2011 winter crises
  10. 10. Fukushima – Daiichi Nuclear disaster
  11. 11. Cyber attacks - W32.STUXNET, March 2010 • Command & control servers identified: • Located in Malaysia and Denmark; • infections in Iran and India reach 155 countries; • connection requests from 40,000 IP addresses; • 60% in Iran, 68% of these operated Step 7. • Sophisticated interaction with C&C server: • First test a valid address eg msn.com; • Establish connection then connect to C&C; • Next step download an update of the malware…
  12. 12. Past week’s keylogger:Predator and Reaper GCSCreech Airforce Base
  13. 13. Pandemics
  14. 14. Pandemics
  15. 15. We can, and we should, prepare to be prepared for unforeseeable and un-planable events• The society developments• Disruptive operating environment• Economic crisis• Planet environmental changing• We are and will all be affected !• How can we make the difference ?
  16. 16. 1st SESSION
  17. 17. The ICAO policies on contingency and emergency response planning Carole Stewart Regional officer ICAO Europe
  18. 18. International Civil Aviation OrganizationICAO Policies on Emergency Response and Contingency Planning Carole Stewart-Green Regional Officer, ANS Implementation (ATM) 18 November 2011 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar Bucharest, Romania
  19. 19. ICAO Policies• Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) detailed in Annexes to the Convention on International Civil Aviation• Procedures for Air Navigation Services (PANS) which complement SARPS• Regional Air Navigation Plans, including procedures documented in Regional Supplementary Procedures• Manuals to assist States to implement SARPS Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 41
  20. 20. References• Annex 2 - Rules of the Air – Together with the SARPS of Annex 11, govern the application of the Procedures for Air Navigation Services — Air Traffic Management (PANS- ATM, Doc 4444) and the Regional Supplementary Procedures – Applies without exception over the High Seas Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 42
  21. 21. References• Annex 6 – Operation of Aircraft – operation of aeroplanes by operators authorized to conduct international commercial air transport operations – Includes scheduled international air services and non-scheduled international air transport operations for remuneration or hire Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 43
  22. 22. References• Annex 11 - Air Traffic Services – Air Traffic Control Service, Flight Information Service and Alerting Service – Establishment of airspace, units and services necessary to promote a safe, orderly and expeditious flow of air traffic – Together with Annex 2, purpose is to ensure that flying on international air routes is carried out under uniform conditions designed to improve the safety and efficiency of air operation Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 44
  23. 23. References• Annex 14 - Aerodromes – Volume 1 – Aerodrome Design and Operations – Includes SARPS related to aerodrome emergency planning• Airport Services Manual (Doc 9137) Part 7 Emergency Planning – pre-planning for airport emergencies – co-ordination between the different airport agencies (or services) and those agencies in the surrounding community that could be of assistance in responding to the emergency – material on how an agency is to carry out its particular functions such as those of the rescue and fire fighting services or air traffic control service are in specific documents concerning these specialties Project title (Insert, Header & Footer) 45
  24. 24. References• Annex 17 - Security – Safeguarding international civil aviation against acts of unlawful interference Project title (Insert, Header & Footer) 46
  25. 25. References• Procedures of Air Navigation Services – Air Traffic Management (PANS ATM, Doc 4444) – complementary to the SARPS contained in Annex 2 and Annex 11 – supplemented when necessary by regional procedures contained in the Regional Supplementary Procedures (Doc 7030) – mainly directed to ATS personnel, but flight crews should be familiar with some of the procedures Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 47
  26. 26. References• Safety Management Manual (SMM) (Doc 9859) – provides States with guidance to develop the regulatory framework and the supporting guidance material for the implementation of safety management systems (SMS) by service providers – provides guidance for the development of a State safety programme (SSP), in accordance with the SARPs contained in Annex 1, Annex 6, Annex 8, Annex 11, Annex 13, Annex 14 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 48
  27. 27. References• Emergency response planning is mainly addressed in Annex 6, Annex 11, Annex 14, the Safety Management Manual and the Airport Services Manual• Contingency planning and procedures are mainly addressed in Annex 2, Annex 11, Annex 17 and the PANS ATM• Numerous ICAO documents and circulars on specific subjects and functions Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 49
  28. 28. Emergency Response Planning• Annex 11 requires States to establish a State safety programme (SSP)• Part of SSP is to require ATS providers implement a Safety Management System (SMS)• Framework for implementation of SSP and SMS is provided in the Safety Management Manual• Minimum requirements for SMS include coordination of emergency response planning Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 50
  29. 29. Emergency Response Planning• Annex 6 requires operators and approved maintenance organizations to develop an Emergency Response Plan (ERP)• ERP provides for the orderly and efficient transition from normal to emergency operations and the return to normal operations• ERP shall be properly coordinated with the emergency response plans of those organizations it must interface with during the provision of its services Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 51
  30. 30. Emergency Response Planning• Safety Management Manual applicable to all service providers – approved training organizations – aircraft operators – approved maintenance organizations – organizations responsible for type design and/or manufacture of aircraft – air traffic service providers – certified aerodromes Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 52
  31. 31. Emergency Response Planning• Emergency Response Plan(ERP) outlines what actions should be taken following an accident and who is responsible for each action• ERP should ensure an orderly and efficient transition from normal to emergency operations• Overall objective is the safe continuation of operations or the return to normal operations as soon as possible• Any organization supporting flight operations should have an ERP Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 53
  32. 32. Emergency Response Planning• ERP should be in the form of a manual• Safety Management Manual, Appendix B provides detailed guidance concerning the following areas which should be addressed in the ERP: – Governing policies, Organization, Notifications, Initial response, Additional assistance, Crisis Management Centre, Records, Accident site, News media, Formal investigations, Family assistance, Post-critical incident stress counselling, Post-occurrence review Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 54
  33. 33. Emergency Response Planning• Operators’ ERPs should be coordinated with airport emergency plans• Checklists should form an integral part of the operations manual or emergency response manual• Training and exercises necessary to ensure capabilities match the plan and to reveal gaps or deficiencies Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 55
  34. 34. Emergency Response Planning• Airports develop airport emergency plans• ATS providers develop contingency plans• Airlines develop an emergency response plan• The coordination of these plans should be described in the SMS manual of each organization Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 56
  35. 35. Contingency Procedures• Annex 2, Annex 11 and the PANS ATM include detailed procedures related to contingency events related to flight operations• Includes flight crew procedures and ATS procedures• Flight crews should be aware of the detailed procedures in Chapter 15 of the PANS ATM related to – Unlawful interference and aircraft bomb threat – Emergency descent – Special procedures for in-flight contingencies in oceanic airspace – Weather deviation procedures – Air-ground communications failure Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 57
  36. 36. Contingency Planning• Annex 11 requires ATS authorities to develop and promulgate contingency plans – detailed guidance is in Attachment C• Annex 17 requires States to develop contingency plans to safeguard civil aviation against acts of unlawful interference• Appropriate measures must be taken for the safety of passengers and crew of an aircraft, which is subjected to an act of unlawful interference, while on the ground until their journey can be continued Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 58
  37. 37. Contingency Planning• To assist in providing for the safe and orderly flow of international air traffic in the event of disruptions of air traffic services and related supporting services• To preserve the availability of major world air routes within the air transportation system in such circumstances• To ensure access to designated aerodromes for humanitarian reasons Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 59
  38. 38. Contingency Planning• Disruptions in one portion of airspace affect adjacent areas• International coordination required• International organizations such as IATA and IFALPA are valuable advisors• ICAO’s role is to facilitate or initiate the necessary coordination Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 60
  39. 39. Contingency Planning• State(s) responsible for providing ATS and related supporting services is (are) also responsible, in the event of disruption or potential disruption of these services, for instituting measures to ensure the safety of international civil aviation operations• Where possible, provisions must be made for alternative facilities and services• Contingency plans should be developed in consultation with other States and airspace users concerned and with ICAO, as appropriate, whenever the effects of the service disruption(s) are likely to affect the services in adjacent airspace Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 61
  40. 40. Contingency Planning• Timely introduction of contingency arrangements essential if hazards to air navigation are to be avoided• States should: – Prepare general contingency plans for foreseeable events (industrial action, labour unrest) – Assess risks due to military conflict or unlawful interference – Review likelihood and possible consequences of natural disasters or public health emergencies – Monitor developments – Designate or establish a central full time agency to provide up to date information Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 62
  41. 41. Contingency Planning• Contingency plan may include – Procedures for avoiding airspace – Current and alternative routes – Simplified route network – Procedures to cope with degraded navigational capability – Procedures to cope with degraded communications or surveillance capability Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 63
  42. 42. Contingency Planning• Contingency plan may include (continued) – Procedures for temporary re-assignment of responsibility for providing ATS – Special in-flight procedures – Increased separation standards – Procedures for controlling access to contingency area(s) Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 64
  43. 43. Contingency Planning• NOTAM of anticipated or actual disruption of air traffic services and/or related supporting services• NOTAM should include the associated contingency arrangements• If disruption is foreseeable, advance notice should not be less than 48 hours• NOTAM of discontinuance of contingency measures and reactivation of normal services Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 65
  44. 44. Regional Resources• Volcanic Ash Contingency Plan – EUR and NAT Regions (www.paris.icao.int)• ATM Operational Contingency Plan – NAT Region (www.paris.icao.int)• EUROCONTROL Guidelines for Contingency Planning of ANS (Including Service Continuity) and associated Reference Guide (www.eurocontrol.int) Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 66
  45. 45. Thank you! Questions? Carole Stewart-Green cstewart@paris.icao.int Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar – 18 November 2011 - Bucharest, Romania 67
  46. 46. Regulatory Framework of the European Union Jose-Luis Penedo Policy Officer EASA
  47. 47. Contingency and EmergencyResponse planning in aviationsafety:The EASA perspectiveJosé Luis PENEDO DEL RIOPolicy Officer, Executive Directorate, EASABucharest, 18.11.11
  48. 48. Outline  Context: EU-EASA system  EASA status  EASA Role  EASA Tasks  EASA Internal Crisis Coordination Cell (ICCC)  Past Emergencies  EASA emergency/crisis response tools  Way Forward: drivers for action28/11/2011 70
  49. 49. EU-EASA system  Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 on common rules in the field of civil aviation: EU-EASA Basic Regulation  1 system - different actors – different roles  Division of competences between:  EU (Council/Parliament/Commission)  European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)  Member States (MS)28/11/2011 71
  50. 50. EASA status  EASA is an EU Agency i.e. a technical body to support the European Commission and contribute to the achievement of a high and uniform level of civil aviation safety in Europe together with other objectives of Reg. 216 by:  Preparing the necessary proportionate rules  Overseeing their actual implementation  Legal, administrative, regulatory and financial autonomy28/11/2011 72
  51. 51. EASA Role  EASA centrepiece of the EU Aviation Safety Framework based on a common total system approach.  EASA provides for harmonised safety standards in all aviation domains  EASA remit as the safety regulator of global aviation covers:  Airworthiness  OPs  Licencing  SES (ATM/ANS)  Aerodromes28/11/2011 73
  52. 52. EASA Tasks  Assists Commission on developing EU (hard) law (common rules/standards)  Regulatory activities (soft law):  Certification Specifications (CS)  Acceptable means of Compliance (AMC)  Guidance Material (GM)  Executive measures (decisions):  Certification of type-design of aeronautical products and approval of organisations: Ensure their continued airworthiness  Enforcement of EU (hard law): suspension, revocation, limitation of approvals  Standardisation of National Aviation Authorities28/11/2011 74
  53. 53. EASA emergency/crisis approach: Internal Crisis Coordination Cell (ICCC)  Purpose of the ICCC is to determine and coordinate EASA actions in emergency/crisis situations. Rules of procedure establish its functioning.  Deputy Directors from Certification, Rulemaking and the Executive Directorate as well as the Head of Communications shall be the permanent members of the ICCC.  The ICCC is empowered to take decisions in the following areas as response to the crisis/emergency:  Internal and external communications  Coordination with external parties  Allocation and deployment of staff  Exceptional expenditure  Safety measures28/11/2011 75
  54. 54. EASA emergency/crisis approach: Internal Crisis Coordination Cell (ICCC)  A crisis or emergency situation shall be activated or deactivated by the Executive Director, triggering the ICCC into action.  This is done when it is considered that the event will have an impact or potential impact on the civil aviation system under Regulation 216 and/or the EASA competences.  Possible scenarios which could be declared as a crisis or emergency case:  Severe disruption of the (safety) aviation system  Aircraft accident/incident  Event disrupting the function of the Agency or affecting EASA competences/responsibilities  Security threats  Heavy meteorological conditions Crisis response plan and a crisis communications plan will be established.28/11/2011 76
  55. 55. EASA emergency/crisis approach: Internal Crisis Coordination Cell (ICCC)  Crisis response plan and a crisis communications plan will be established.  The Head of Communications shall act as communications focal point for the crisis and as a spokesperson. The Head of Communications shall be responsible for all external communications during the crisis and all internal communications to EASA staff.  EASA will ensure coordination with relevant organisations and competent authorities.  ICCC shall coordinate with the competent EASA Departments those measures or actions it has decided as necessary as response to the crisis/emergency situation.  A crisis/emergency exercise will be organised early 2012. EASA is permanent member of the European Aviation Crisis Coordination Cell.28/11/2011 77
  56. 56. Internal Coordination is key  Internal Coordination:  EASA Certification provides engineering information  EASA Safety Analysis accident and background information  Other EASA Departments on an “as needed” basis Result: Coordinated decision making and response28/11/2011 78
  57. 57. Past Emergencies  Aircraft Accidents/ Incidents  Examples: AF 447 Dash 8 Q400 Qantas A380 Engine Failure  Other aviation related events:  Volcanic Ash28/11/2011 79
  58. 58. EASA emergency/crisis response tools  Rulemaking actions:  Rulemaking Task A-NPA 2011-06 (May 2011) to provide an opinion to the European Commission on operational risk assessment and IVATF Guidance Material (GM).  Future Rulemaking Task to transpose IVATF GM to operators SMS GM.  Rulemaking Task 2011-17 to amend CS and introduce a new obligation on manufacturers to promulgate information to support operators in developing Safety Risk Assessments (SRA).  Ruelmaking Tasks on the airworthiness field (e.g. on turbine engines on Volcanic Ash limits)28/11/2011 80
  59. 59. EASA emergency/crisis response tools  Safety Information Bulletins (SIB):  SIBs and their updates like the one on Volcanic Ash (2010- 17) are used to assist voluntary/collaborative decision making in the event of a crisis.  (Emergency) Airworthiness Directives (ADs) adressed to TC holders and affect operators mandating actions to correct detected problems in an approved type-design.  Accident investigation: EASA as adviser of accident investigation boards and response to safety recommendations28/11/2011 81
  60. 60. EASA emergency/crisis response tools  Information: Actions on-going on development and maintenance of a data base of known operational safety risks assessments.  Research actions: e.g. on improvement and methodes for the measurement of ash.28/11/2011 82
  61. 61. Way forward: drivers for action  Promote risk assessment approach:  New methodology for risk assessment and management  Criteria for risk acceptance  Mutual recognition of safety risk assessments  Further enhance cooperation state to state and state to relevant European institutions/bodies  Rapid provision of simplified and reliable information  Participation of Industry is important  Accellerate implementation of SES  Training  Common global approach and effective decision making mechanism (ICAO initiatives)28/11/2011 83
  62. 62. Thank you very much for your attention
  63. 63. National oversight of contingency and emergency plans at national, European and global level Mrs. Claudia Virlan Director General of Romanian CAA
  64. 64. ROMANIAN CIVIL AERONAUTICAL AUTHORITY National oversight of contingency and emergency plans at national, European and global level Presented by Claudia VÎRLAN, Director general Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 86
  65. 65. Motto:“PREPARE FOR THE WORST BUT HOPE FOR THE BEST” Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881), British prime minister and novelist Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 87
  66. 66. Content Our national environment; Oversight of contingency plans; Oversight of emergency plans; Global and regional approach; Conclusions Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 88
  67. 67. Our national environment Ministry of Transport Service and/or Product Provider Organizations under and Infrastructure the authority of Ministry of Transport • Air Operators – TAROM (State Authority for Civil • Airports – LROP, LRBS, LRTR, LRCK Aviation) • Air Navigation Service Providers – ROMATSA Air Club of RomaniaROMANIAN CIVIL (Sports and Leisure Aviation)AERONAUTICAL Superior Aviation School AUTHORITY (Approved Training Center)(Safety Authority for Civil Aviation) Aeronautical Industry Private Service and/or Product Provider Organizations Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 89
  68. 68. Our national environment The Romanian CAA was established by Government Decision no. 405/1993; The role according to the aforementioned decision is to assure the application of national regulations, to issue procedures and instructions for the application of these regulations; The CAA became the technical specialized body of the MoT by delegation of competences. Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 90
  69. 69. Oversight of contingency plans• Capability to continue with the provision of air navigation services whatever the circumstances;• Readiness to act in the unfortunate event; Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 91
  70. 70. Oversight of contingency plansThe requirements for Air Traffic Services are setby national regulations: ICAO Annex 11 – Air Traffic Services (RACR-ATS)  cap. 2.30 – Contingency arrangements  Attachment C - Material relating to contingency planning ICAO Doc. 4444 – PANS-ATM (PIAC – ATM)  cap. 8 - ATS surveillance services, 8.8 – Emergencies, hazards and equipment failures  cap. 15 – Procedures related to emergencies, communications failure and contingencies Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 92
  71. 71. Oversight of contingency plansThe requirements for Air Navigation Services areset at European level: Regulation (EU) No 1035/2011- common requirements:  Annex 1, pct. 8.2 – Contingency plans Regulation (EC) No 1108/2009:  Annex Vb – Service provision shall not be undertaken unless the service provider shall establish and implement a contingency plan covering emergency and abnormal situations that may occur in relation to its services; Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 93
  72. 72. Oversight of contingency plansMechanisms to ensure acceptability andconformity with the defined requirements:  existence of contingency plans;  verification if refers to all provided services;  verification if the contingency and emergency plans comply with applicable regulatory requirements  objective evidences about the implementation;  verification if the personnel is aware about the contingency arrangements;  verification if the personnel is trained in regard to contingency arrangements; Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 94
  73. 73. Oversight of contingency plans The approval of the contingency plan is part of the certification process and ongoing supervision; It is treated in a specific chapter of the audit report; The State can be held liable for lack of proper oversight. Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 95
  74. 74. Oversight of emergency plans• Incidents, accidents or medical emergencies interfere with the normal functioning of the airport• A plan is needed for every type of emergency, accident or incident possible Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 96
  75. 75. Oversight of emergency plansThe requirements for Airports are set by nationaland European regulations: ICAO Annex 14 – Aerodromes, vol. 1: Aerodrome Design and Operation (RACR-AD-AAC)  cap. 9, Section 9.1 – Aerodrome emergency planning Regulation (EC) No 1108/2009:  Annex Va –The aerodrome operator shall establish and implement an aerodrome emergency plan, covering emergency scenarios that may occur at the aerodrome or in its surroundings. This plan shall be coordinated, as appropriate, with the local community emergency plan; Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 97
  76. 76. Oversight of emergency plansMechanisms to ensure acceptability andconformity with the defined requirements:  existence of Airports emergency plans;  verification if the emergency plans comply with applicable regulatory requirements  objective evidences about the implementation (including exercises records);  verification if the personnel is aware about the emergency arrangements;  verification if the personnel is trained in regard to emergency arrangements; Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 98
  77. 77. Oversight of emergency plansMechanisms to ensure acceptability andconformity with the defined requirements:  verification if the Airport Emergency Plan is coordinated with the Airport Security Plan and the Regional/Community Emergency Plan;  Evaluation of the operational activities;  Evaluation of the rescue and fire fighting sevices;  SMS implementation analysis (Coordination of emergency response planning) Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 99
  78. 78. Oversight of medical emergency plans The procedures regarding medical emergencies, either in-flight or in the airport, are implemented both in the airport’s emergency plans and in the airliners manual; These procedures are being reviewed yearly or even more frequently, if the situation demands it, by the CAA’s inspectors for aeronautical medicine and human factors; The stakeholders are requested to test this plans through either real life or just table top exercises, for constant improvement; 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 0
  79. 79. Oversight of medical emergency plans Every international airport in Romania has an agreement with regional public health authorities regarding the appropriate actions for prevention of spreading of communicable disease; The terms of the agreement are evaluated yearly by the public health authorities in regard with specific guidelines from WHO (World Health Organization); There are preliminary discussions to create a national plan for preventing of spreading of communicable disease through air travel with all the stakeholders involved 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 1
  80. 80. Global and regional approach The scale of the event impose global or regional preparedness:  pandemics, terrorist attacks (global);  volcanic ash, terrorist attacks (regional);  cross-border contingency; 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 2
  81. 81. Global and regional approachFor the medicalemergencies,includingcommunicabledisease outbreaks,the internationalframework is thebasis of a nationalpreparedness plan 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 3
  82. 82. Global and regional approach The European Aviation Crisis Coordination Cell (EACCC):  Facilitate management of crisis situations affecting aviation in Europe  Activated when circumstances beyond normal environment of ops are evident 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 4
  83. 83. Global and regional approach FAB operation:  Relations or conclusion of agreements with neighbouring States, for coordination purposes  NSAs agreement on oversight 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 5
  84. 84. Conclusions Contingency/Emergency policies, concepts and plans can provide a view of what the situation may look like following an event, but all actors must be ready and prepared to act in the unfortunate event; The values: assures customers, builds confidence, helps to protect and enhance reputation, protects people and assets, contributes to safeguarding national infrastructure and supports international networks. 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 6
  85. 85. ROMANIAN CIVIL AERONAUTICAL AUTHORITY Thank you! Any questions? 10 Flight Safety Foundation Regional Seminar, Bucharest, ROMANIA, 18 November 2011 7
  86. 86. 2nd SESSION
  87. 87. Developing and deploying contingency and emergency plans at national, European and global level Sid Lawrence EUROCONTROL
  88. 88. Flight Safety Foundation 18 November 2011 Bucharest Developing and deploying contingency and emergency plansRichard “Sid” LawrenceEUROCONTROL
  89. 89. EUROCONTROL Guidelines Released 2009
  90. 90. Scope• Lessons Learned/Key Points• Contingency v Emergency Planning• Structured Approach • Organisational aspects • Policy • Planning process • Assurance • Promotion
  91. 91. Scope - National, Regional, Global Summary of Key Points/Principles
  92. 92. What is Contingency? - ICAO • ICAO Annex 11, Chapter 2, Attachment C “Air Traffic Services shall develop and promulgatecontingency plans for implementing in the event ofdisruption, or potential disruption, of air traffic servicesand related supporting services in the airspace for whichthey are responsible for the provision of such services”“Contingency plans are intended to provide alternativefacilities and services to those provided for in theregional air navigation plan…”
  93. 93. What is Contingency? – EU and National• Regulation (EC) No 1038/2011, 8.2 “…an air navigation service provider shall have in place contingency plans for all services it provides in case of events which result in significant degradation or interruption of their operations.”• Regulation (EC) No 1108/2009: Annex Vb “Service provision shall not be undertaken unless the service provider shall establish and implement a contingency plan covering emergency and abnormal situations that may occur in relation to its services.”• Council Directive No 2008/114/EC – European Critical Infrastructure• National rules
  94. 94. What is Contingency? - Contingency Life- Cycle Safety Business driven driven
  95. 95. Planning methodologies
  96. 96. State Civil & Military Airports Authorities Consultation ANSP Airspace Users Promotion Policy Policy on Contingenc y Contingency Process Execution Operational &Assurance Plan Concept for Contingency Achievement Contingency Plans
  97. 97. 1. PolicyOrganisation 2. Operational Concept for Contingency State Authorities , Military Authorities, Airspaces Users, Airports 3. Establish the Requirements of Contingency Measures 4. Assemble the ANSP Contingency TF/Team 4.1 Secure Team Resources 4.2 Secure Budget of Contingency Planning 5. Liaise with Key Actors 5.1 Key 5.4 Critical 5.6 Other 5.2 Military 5.3 External ANS 5.5 Appropriate Personnel in infrastructure National Authorities Suppliers Local Authorities ATM suppliers Agencies 6. Consultation of the Key Personnel and Users (airspace, airports) during contingency planning 10. Update Contingency Plan 7. Approval and Oversight of the Contingency Plan by Oversight authority 8. Prepare the ANSP organization for executing contingency 9. Change Management (e.g. impact on Contingency Plan of new system , new procedures
  98. 98. All Together Now!
  99. 99. Policy – General Considerations
  100. 100. Policy – Setting the Requirements for ATM Contingency StateRequirements: (Rule-maker)• Safety• Security• Capacity & Flight efficiency (if relevant)• Environment (if relevant) Consultation Airspace Users ANSP & Airports Discussion on: • Level of Capacity & Flight efficiency provided during contingency situations
  101. 101. Policy – ANSP Considerations Policy onContingenc y • Policy for Contingency or Statement of Intent • Attitude and Commitment • Scope – Emergency and/or Service Continuity • Which units? • What type of Services; all or only some? • Goals and objectives – performance criteria • Culture – integrated or stand alone? • Business and Risk Management. • Policy and/or Statement of Intent feeds the ANSP’s Operational Concept of Contingency
  102. 102. Operational Concept – Reconciliation State Policy on Contingenc y Consultation process Airspace Users ANSP ANSP Airports Operational Concept Strategies € Economics Risks/Hazards
  103. 103. Operational Concept – Elaboration - Gap Analysis Old New • Changes • Justified ? • Pros & Cons • Is it Safe?Requirementsreview ? Planning
  104. 104. Generic Contingency Planning Process Inventory of Air Navigation Services & Critical Infrastructure (IT, Power) List possible causes of disruption (watch keeping & updates of plans) Keep realistic ones Change Management Check existing plans (are they suffficient?) Plan Contingency measures (New or Amendments)Plan measures for Recovery back to Normal Document Contingency plans
  105. 105. Uniqueness- One Size Doesn’t Fit All
  106. 106. Contingency lives!
  107. 107. Planning Considerations – Testing/Exercising
  108. 108. Planning Human Considerations – Training, Licensing
  109. 109. Decision Time„Go, No Go‟ for Who makesService the call?Continuity
  110. 110. PromotionAwareness: Disclosure:Confidence Commercial“Peace of V SecurityMind” “Need to know”
  111. 111. Promotion - EUROCONTROL Guidelineshttp://www.eurocontrol.int/ses/public/standard_page/sk_sesis_guidelines.html
  112. 112. Functional Airspace Blocks (FABs) • Contingency remains a national responsibility. • But more cross- border activity likely to mean • Closer harmonisation of contingency planning and execution in the future.
  113. 113. Network effects
  114. 114. Volcanic Ash Crises• April 2010 – 100,000 flights cancelled• May 2010 - only some 7,000 flights lost• Initial (informal) formation of European Aviation Crisis Coordination Cell• May 2011- Volcex, revised approach adopted• 21st May – ash plume up to 20km• DNM volcanic ash procedure activated – NOP Portal, teleconferences• 22nd May - EACCC activated• Impact: Iceland, Scandinavia, UK, Germany• ~900 flights cancelled
  115. 115. Network Manager Implementing Rule: European Aviation Crisis Coordination Cell (EACCC) Coordinate management of response to the network crisis affecting aviation in Europe EACCC Activated when circumstances beyond normal environment of ops are evident Airlines Members Airports ANSP Military State focal pointsNetwork Manager
  116. 116. Special Cases• Volcanic Ash• Nuclear (IAEA)• Industrial Action• Common failure modes (software,hardware, avionics)• Pandemic and Public Health
  117. 117. CAPSCA - ICAO Global level collaboration?Cooperative Arrangements for the Prevention of Spread of Communicable Disease through Air Travel • Public Health and Pandemics. • International Health Regulations (IHR) - Require a whole of aviation, whole of society approach. • ICAO Assembly resolution 42/1–2010 requires national preparedness plan for aviation. • CAPSCA initiated by ICAO in Asia/Pacific Region in 2007 (following H5N1 ‘bird flu’). • All ICAO Regions covered – CAPSCA Europe 1st meeting September 2011 in Paris.
  118. 118. NEW this week !http://www.capsca.org/Europe.html
  119. 119. Summary of Key Points/Principles (1)• Know your Business: Think end-to end services• Understand contingency: What do you understand it to mean?• Clear direction and structure: Policy, Risks, Requirements-based, Operational Concept,Stakeholder Consultation.• Organisation: Roles and Responsibilities. Who’s in charge; who makes ‘the call’?• Obligations: Know your responsibilities and liabilities.• „Normal‟ activity: Part of ‘everyday’ corporate management and overall crisis management.• Complexity: Not a one-man band! All parts of the organisation involved. Don’t forget the Regulator!• Flexibility: Up to date, change proof.• Continuity: It’s not a one-off activity. Don’t leave plans on the shelf. Part of the management culture.
  120. 120. Summary of Key Points/Principles (2)• Top-down meets bottom-up: Use the ‘shop floor’ to find solutions and workarounds.• Similarity: Mirror normal operations as far as practicable.• Compatibility: One size probably doesn’t fit all. Need local solutions or variations of solutions.• Speciality: Special cases need special attention.• Harmonisation: Consider other stakeholder interfaces throughout; coordinate and integrate asnecessary; assure essential interfaces- e.g. CFMU, airport, airspace users.• Practice: Training, Exercising, Testing.• Awareness: Promotion versus confidentiality. Builds ‘peace of mind’.• Reputation: Never mind the ‘financial’ cost, what about the cost to your reputation; are you reallyready?
  121. 121. Further Reference/Guidance Materials• British Standard 25999 – Business Continuity Management 2006 http://www.bs25999.com/• Business Continuity Institute (BCI) Guidelines – 2007 http://www.thebci.org/• UK Resilience http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience• Criticall (Communications specialist) http://www.criticall.co.uk/• EUROCONTROL – Just Culture Guidance Material for Interfacing with the Media (includes Crisis Management section) http://www.eurocontrol.int/esp/public/site_preferences/display_library_list_public.html#7
  122. 122. Questions Thank you for your attention Any questions?Richard.lawrence@eurocontrol.int
  123. 123. EUROCONTROL Guidelines Released 2009

×