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Games for Change Methodology

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  • 1. G4C: Strategies & Methodology Developed with E-Line Media Aug 31, 2012
  • 2. WHY GAMES? Games are expanding: - $60B Global business - 97% of teenagers in America* - Average Facebook player is a 39 year old female* Pew Report, Nielsen, PopCap
  • 3. Arguably the mostdominant media form of the 21st Century
  • 4. GAMES AND LEARNINGFederation of American Scientists &National Science Foundation:“Games offer criticalattributes for 21st centurylearning.”** National Summit on Educational Games
  • 5. 21st CENTURY SKILL BUILDING Playing and making games foster critical skills necessary for success in a rapidly changing 21st Century world. + Systems thinking + Digital media literacy + Iterative process + Creativity + Problem solving + Team building + Planning & execution + Collaboration
  • 6. Computer and video games are being embraced by leadingfoundations, non-profits, universities, and government agencies to further their public interest and educational goals
  • 7. www.gamesforchange.org
  • 8. Latest Trends
  • 9. MAINSTREAM ADOPTIONSupreme Court Justice Former US Chief Technology Officer Vice PresidentSandra Day O’Connor Aneesh Chopra Al Gore
  • 10. DIRECT ACTION GAMES wetopia by Sojo Studios
  • 11. DEVELOPING WORLD AUDIENCES
  • 12. YOUTH CREATING GAMES C++ College/Professional Commercial High Modding School Tools Middle SchoolElementary School Game Design Programming Scaffolded / Constrained Un-scaffolded / Unconstrained
  • 13. TRANSMEDIA ‘FOR GOOD’
  • 14. Strengths
  • 15. 10 reasons why games are a powerful platform for highlyengaged learning and social impact
  • 16. 1. PARTICIPATORY Games are interactive, ‘lean-forward’: players makedecisions with consequences resulting in player agency 2. ROLE PLAYING Games enable players to step into different roles in different worlds, building awareness & empathy
  • 17. 3. CHALLENGES & REWARDS Games engage players deeply through a delicate balance of challenges & rewards leading to highly focused, sustained engagement 4. FUN TO FAILGames enable players to try & fail in a safe environment; experimenting at their own pace until they succeed
  • 18. 5. SOCIAL Games are increasingly networked, fostering peer-to-peer, collaborative learning 6. GAMES AS SERVICE Games are increasingly becoming on-going services thatcan be continually optimized for engagement and impact
  • 19. 7. COMPLEXITY Games require players to navigate and understand complex systems, interfaces & rules 8. BITS AND ATOMS Games are increasingly crossing over into the real-worldthrough new input devices, mobile & location-aware platforms
  • 20. 9. MOTIVATIONGood games create a deep desire to learn.
  • 21. 10. UBIQUITY XBOX 360 Wii PCs Mobile devices Nintendo DS Sony PSP 27M 45M Billions Billions 96M 42MPlay power $10 Wii Ware XBLA Sony PSN Sony PS2 Sony PS3 TV computer Network 50M 19M
  • 22. Challenges
  • 23. MAKING IMPACT GAMES FUN Organic alignment between what makes game fun & financial / impact objectives + = Many fail: “chocolate-covered broccoli”
  • 24. COMPLEX ECO-SYSTEM XBOX 360 Wii PCs Mobile devices Nintendo DS Sony PSP 27M 45M Billions Billions 96M 42MPlay power $10 Wii Ware XBLA Sony PSN Sony PS2 Sony PS3 TV computer Network 50M 19M Many fail: misalignment of platform/genre and audience
  • 25. ENGAGING QUALIFIED TEAMS Game Production Design Business & Art & Project Team Fundraising Design Content Technology WritingMany fail: team does not have necessary skills to execute
  • 26. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MODELS Game as Product Game as Service Game released, Game continually customer support for updated, enhanced, time-bounded period supported 24/7 Boxed Software Virtual Worlds Downloaded Software Social Networking Many fail: under-resourced, especially games as service that require on-going resources.
  • 27. PUBLISHING STRATEGY (1) Audience (8) (2) Assessment Context (7) (3) Execution Impact (6) (4) Gameplay Platform (5) Sustaining Many fail: Marketing / distribution / context not baked into design.
  • 28. G4C THE 8 STEPSOur methodology to create games that have meaningful social impact Developed in partnership with
  • 29. (1) Audience Who is it designed for? Region, age, demographic, psychographic, media and gaming accessibility and ability (2) Context When & how is it played?Moderated vs. un-moderated, home, school, after-school, l i b r a r y, c o m m u n i t y c e n t e r
  • 30. (3) Impact What is the goal? J o b s k i l l s , 2 1 st c e n t u r y skills, motivation, awareness, fundraising, behavior change, real-world action (4) Platform What is the right technology?Console, console download, handheld, PC, Facebook, mobile
  • 31. (5) Sustainability Understanding the financials Cost to launch, cost to sustain, cost to u s e r, i m p a c t - f r i e n d l y r e v e n u e m o d e l s (6) Gameplay What is the design?Organic alignment of what makes game fun and what makes game impactful
  • 32. (7) Execution From concept to launch & beyondTe a m - b u i l d i n g , r a p i d p r o t o t y p i n g , t r o u b l e s h o o t i n g , marketing, distribution & support (8) Assessment How to measure success? Real-time & embedded assessment models, portfolio management
  • 33. Thinking Strategically
  • 34. A GAME ‘ENGINE’ A tech platform to create multiple titles with clear separation between back-end and content / GUI.
  • 35. A PORTFOLIO APPROACH Multiple titles, multiple platforms, lowering the risk.
  • 36. STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Impact Domain Partners Experts Platform Project Researchers Experts Leadership Assessment Game Partners Development
  • 37. Case #1:Games in the classroom
  • 38. iCIVICS REACH (since August 2009): - 1.2 million players - 12,000 classrooms - 50 states and Washington DC EVALUATION: - 78% of students gained a better understanding of how their government worked. - 47% continued playing at home for fun!
  • 39. Case #2: Games in thedeveloping world
  • 40. FREEDOM HIV / AIDS REACH: - 67 million devices - 10.3 million play sessions - India and 6 East African countries EVALUATION: - Significant increase in learning - Changes in attitude and safer sex practices
  • 41. Case #3:Direct action games
  • 42. FREE RICE HOW DOES IT WORK? A multiple choice quiz, for every question you get correct, 10 grains of rice are donated to the World Food Programme. ON A DAILY BASIS: - 8 million page views - 45 million grains of rice: enough to feed 2,500 people
  • 43. Case #4:The power of the many
  • 44. FOLD IT TIME MAGAZINE: U.S. gamers … have helped unlock the structure of an AIDS-related enzyme that the scientific community had been unable to unlock for a decade. The solution represents a significant step forward in the quest to cure retroviral diseases like AIDS. September 9 2011
  • 45. Case #5: Youthmaking games
  • 46. C++ College/Professional Commercial High Modding School Tools Middle SchoolElementary School Game Design Programming Scaffolded / Constrained Un-scaffolded / Unconstrained
  • 47. NATIONAL STEM CHALLENGE
  • 48. SCHOLASTIC ART & WRITING AWARDS
  • 49. Case #6: Evaluation &brain research
  • 50. RE-MISSION CONCLUSIONS: The video-game intervention significantly improved treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge in adolescents and young adults who were undergoing cancer therapy. August 2008 edition of the medical journal Pediatric.
  • 51. RE-MISSION BRAIN RESEARCH: Several key brain regions were activated when playing Re-Mission, including neural structures involved in emotion and motivation, and learning and memory.. 10th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine (ICBM)
  • 52. Your game here_
  • 53. www.gamesforchange.orgmichelle@gamesforchange.org // @mbyrd asi@gamesforchange.org // @aburak

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