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  • 1. 1 Dear Students and Parents, The Secondary Course Guide for Georgetown East View High School and Georgetown High School is a valuable tool to assist you as you prepare for high school classes at either high school. The purpose of this guide is to provide you with information on State and Georgetown Independent School District graduation requirements to enable you to make the best decisions for your high school career. This guide includes high school graduation requirements, career programs of study, college admission processes, and opportunities for school involvement to ensure a successful high school experience. Georgetown ISD is committed to helping all students plan for a bright and promising future. I encourage you to carefully study the information in this catalog to make course choices that will solidify individual interests and goals as well as meet all graduation requirements. All students should consider which course selections will lead to the greatest number of future opportunities. These programs allow you to make choices that best suit your individual needs. When choosing courses for a particular year, it is important to consider the implications for the subsequent high school years, graduation, and post-high school years. I encourage you to select challenging courses that meet your needs and prepare you to meet your educational and career goals. In Georgetown ISD, there is a wide range of programs designed to prepare students for post-high school experiences: college, business or technical school, military service, fine arts, immediate employment, and many others. We begin the enrollment process with great anticipation for the year to come. Please contact the campus counselor(s) for more information on the many services and resources available for your high school careers. Also note that any updates or changes to the course guide are made to the online version only and will, in every situation, be considered the most current and final 2014-15 Course Guide. Best regards for a wonderful school year, Joe Dan Lee Superintendent Georgetown ISD is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate in hiring based on age, race, color, creed, religion, disability, gender, ethnic or national origin, or military or veteran status. GISD prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities and will reasonable accommodate applicants with a disability, upon request, and will provide equal employment opportunities in accordance with Titles VI and VII, Title IX, Age Discrimination Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, and local Board policies FB (Legal) and FB (Local).
  • 2. 2 Georgetown Independent School District BOARD OF TRUSTEES SCOTT ALARCON President MIKE HEWLETT Vice-President RONNA JOHNSON Secretary FRED BARHYDT GREG EADY SCOTT STRIBLING ANDY WEBB Georgetown East View High School 4490 E. University Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-1800 Georgetown High School 2211 N. Austin Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-5100 Richarte High School 2295 N. Austin Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-5120 Note: Courses in this catalog may not be available on all campuses or may not be offered in a given year. A minimum of 10 students must enroll in a course in order for the course to be offered in a given semester.
  • 3. 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS STUDENT SERVICES ...................................................................4 CORE ACADEMICS…………….............................................4 PRE AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS......................4 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ..................................4 CREDIT BY EXAMINATION.....................................................5 SUMMER SCHOOL..................................................................5 GIFTED AND TALENTED SERVICES ........................................5 SERVICES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ...................5 COURSES DESIGNATED WITH GM, M, T, SKILLS T................6 COURSES DESIGNATED WITH G, INCLUSION, BASIC ..............6 SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES.............................................6 SECTION 504 SERVICES .........................................................6 DYSLEXIA SERVICES .............................................................6 ACCELERATED LEARNING (ACCELL) ..................................6 REQUIRED STAAR/TAKS/EOC PREPARATION COURSES ....7 COLLEGE READINESS ........................................................ 7-8 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS CHART ...........9 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS .....................10 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION PROGRAMS .....................10 GRADUATION CREDITS.................................................11 PHYSICAL EDUCATION SUBSTITUTE CREDITS .....................11 TAKS EXIT-LEVEL EXAM REQUIREMENTS.........................11 END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS...........................................11 ACADEMIC PROGRAM INFORMATION RICHARTE HIGH SCHOOL ....................................................12 EARLY GRADUATION ..........................................................12 COLLEGE PREPARATORY CREDIT ........................................12 PRE AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM ..............12 EARLY COLLEGE START...............................................13 DUAL CREDIT ENROLLMENT........................................13 CO-ENROLLMENT.........................................................13 GISD/ACC DUAL CREDIT COURSE LIST ...............14, 15 TECH PREP ..................................................................16 TECH PREP ARTICULATED COURSE AGREEMENTS .......17 METHODS TO EARNING COLLEGE CREDIT CHART........18 ALTERNATIVE METHODS FOR HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT .........19 GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND CLASS RANK ........................19 GRADE POINT AVERAGE ..............................................19 ACADEMIC CLASS RANK..............................................19 COURSES COUNTED IN CLASS RANK.....................20 WEIGHTED GPA CLASS RANK CALCULATION ......20 CALCULATION SCALE ...........................................21 ADVANCED COURSES............................................22 ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT CLASS RANKING................22 CLASS RANK ........................................................22 TRANSFER STUDENT GRADES ...............................22 EARLY GRADUATES AND BEYOND 4-YEAR CONTINUERS .........................................................22 VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN ................. 22 TOP TEN PERCENT OF GRADUATING CLASS ......... 22 REQUIRED STATE ASSESSMENTS FOR GRADUATION .............. 23 STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2010-12 OR EARLIER ........................................................................ 23 STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2011-12 OR LATER ........................................................................... 23 GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................ 23 GRADE LEVEL CLASSIFICATION ......................................... 23 SCHEDULE CHANGES .......................................................... 23 SEMESTER SYSTEM............................................................. 24 SUSPENSION FROM EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES........... 24 COLLEGE INFORMATION AUTOMATIC ADMISSIONS TOP TEN PERCENT..................... 24 COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS.............................................. 24 COLLEGE CONNECTION ...................................................... 25 CLEP.................................................................................. 25 GRADUATION GRADE LEVEL PLANNING CHART .................... 26 GRADUATION PLANNING WORKSHEET................................... 27 HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS INDEPENDENT STUDIES....................................................... 28 LANGUAGE ARTS................................................................ 29 READING............................................................................. 33 MATHEMATICS ................................................................... 35 SCIENCES............................................................................ 41 SOCIAL STUDIES ................................................................. 47 OCCUPATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS....................................... 52 ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES..................................................... 53 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH................................... 55 HEALTH AND P.E................................................................ 57 FINE ARTS .......................................................................... 62 COMMUNICATION ............................................................... 73 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION .................................. 74 AGRICULTURE, FOOD & NATURAL RESOURCES ................. 75 ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION..................................... 78 ARTS, A/V TECHNOLOGY & COMMUNICATIONS ................ 79 BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION.................. 82 EDUCATION & TRAINING.................................................... 84 HEALTH SCIENCE................................................................ 85 HOSPITALITY & TOURISM................................................... 87 HUMAN SERVICES............................................................... 88 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.............................................. 89 LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS & SECURITY............ 91 NJROTC ............................................................................ 92 SCIENCE, TECH, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS............... 93 TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION & LOGISTICS................. 95 INDEX OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSES........................................... 97 APPENDIX A ADVANCED COURSES........................................ 100
  • 4. 4 Student Services Core Academics Core academic classes provide instruction in all State-mandated Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) through the Board approved GISD curriculum requirements. The TEKS identify what Texas students should know and be able to do at every grade and in every course. The State Board of Education has adopted the TEKS as the standard curriculum for all Texas schools. Core academic classes provide a solid education for students as they prepare to enter post-secondary education, technical job preparation programs and/or the workforce. The Texas Education Code requires students to master the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in English Language Arts/Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and PE. The TEKS curriculum provides students with learning objectives called Student Expectations (SE). Mastery of the TEKS curriculum is measured in the core academic classes through the students’ performance on the State-mandated Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) and the STAAR End-of-Course Exams. Learning in the core academic classes focuses on comprehension, application, analysis and synthesis of subject area content, processes and skills. Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement Programs The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program offers high school students an opportunity to take college-level courses. Upon successful completion of the course, the student receives high school credit with honors; and, if the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced placement, credit, or both may be awarded upon college entrance. Pre-AP courses contain the levels of rigor necessary to provide readiness for the increased difficulty of the high school AP classes. Formal identification is not required to participate in Pre-AP and/or Advanced Placement courses. Careful consideration of the time demands of extracurricular activities, employment, community service, homework and other activities should be considered. If you have questions regarding whether or not this is the right course for you/your student, please contact your student’s teacher, counselor or campus administrator. To learn more about Pre-AP courses, please go to the following link: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com. Please read the Pre-AP Request Form carefully before requesting Pre-AP courses. Consultation with the prior/current year teacher and school counselor is recommended, although not required, before requesting Pre-AP courses. GISD is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge may enroll in Pre-AP courses. It is recommended, but not required, that students who elect to take AP courses participate in Pre-AP courses in 9th -10th grades. All Pre-AP and AP courses are listed in the Course Descriptions section of this Course Catalog. A minimum enrollment of 10 students is required for the class to be offered. Endorsements The Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program (FEHSP) offers students the opportunity to earn an endorsement, or major course of study. The endorsement offers a student the ability to earn a total of 28 total credits (a combination of core requirements, local req uirements and endorsement electives) in a targeted area of study for high school graduation. The five endorsement options for students are Arts and Humanities, Business and Industry, Public Service, STEM (Science and Math), and Multidisciplinary Career and Technical Education Career and Technical Education in Georgetown I.S.D. is focused on meeting the individual needs of all students by providing curricula to meet the demands of our 21st Century global economy. It is the goal of Georgetown’s Career and Technical Education Program to provide for relevant, career-related experiences and rigorous, high-quality academic instruction to ensure that each and every student attains mastery of the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve a lifetime of success. Georgetown ISD aligns with the Achieve Texas initiative to provide students with a rigorous and relevant high school experience based upon high academic standards and cutting-edge technical instruction supported through real-world connectivity and hands-on experience.
  • 5. 5 All students have the opportunity to enroll in Career and Technical Education courses along with the more traditional academic courses. Enrollment in Career and Technical Education courses is open to all qualified students without regard to race, color, creed, religious affiliation, sex or handicapping conditions. Credit by Examination Students may earn high school credit through the successful completion of a credit by exam. A student in Grades 6–12, who has had sufficient prior formal instruction as determined by the District on the basis of a review of the student’s educational records and who has failed a course, may gain credit for the course by passing a State- approved proficiency examination. Students must score 70% or better on the test. A student in grades 6-12 will be given credit for an academic subject in which he or she has had no prior instruction if the student scores 90% on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course. If a student is given credit in a subject on the basis of an examination, the school district must enter the examination score on the student's transcript. Although it is used in calculating the GPA in eligible courses, it is not used in computing class rank. A student may not use this examination to regain eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities. Students must also take any required STAAR End-of-Course exams. Summer School Certain courses are offered during summer school for credit recovery and/or STAAR/TAKS remediation. Selected students (based upon their performance on their most recent STAAR/TAKS tests) should enroll in summer school. The number of students enrolled determines actual courses offered. Contact the campus principal’s office for more information. Summer school information should be available at campuses in April, prior to the June start date. Courses taken during summer school are counted for credit only and are recorded as a P (Pass) or F (Fail). Gifted and Talented (GT) Services The Georgetown Independent School District is committed to providing an appropriate education for all students. The district believes that highly able students exist at all age levels and in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. The purpose of the GT program is to provide learning experiences that meet the educational needs of students whose academic and/or intellectual abilities and thinking processes are significantly advanced for their ages. These students have opportunities to demonstrate self-directed learning, analytical thinking, and highly developed communication skills as evidenced by advanced and innovative products and presentations. Instruction for gifted students focuses on pacing, depth, and complexity. Although Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses are open to all students desiring a challenge, GT courses are for identified gifted and talented students. Teachers of GT students are trained in methods of differentiating for gifted students and will provide opportunities for identified gifted students to demonstrate their abilities. The GT courses provide GT identified students with enriched TEKS-based curriculum and opportunities. At the high school level, there are independent study courses that meet the requirements for the Gifted/Talented State Performance Standards Research Projects: Independent Study in Mathematics, and Capstone Research in selected disciplines. (See Course Descriptions under Independent Studies: Capstone Research Courses.) Gifted students are highly encouraged to participate in these courses. Other service options appropriate for gifted/talented students include academic competitions, academic clubs, Distinguished Achievement Program, dual/concurrent enrollment with Austin Community College, distance learning, as well as credit for acceleration, early high school graduation, and a high-quality performing arts program. Please contact the campus guidance office for additional information. Services for English Language Learners It is the policy of the State of Texas that every student in the State who has a home language other than English and is identified as limited English proficient (LEP) shall be provided a full opportunity to participate in an English as a second language (ESL) program. The ESL program shall emphasize the mastery of English language skills as well as mathematics, science, and social studies to enable LEP students to participate equitably in school. Both Georgetown High School and East View High School have ESL classes that are part of the English/Language Arts Department. Students receive TEKS-based curriculum utilizing individualized instructional approaches such as sheltered instruction in other content area courses. Courses are offered to students based on the Limited English Proficiency Committee (LPAC) recommendations.
  • 6. 6 Courses designated with GM, M, T, Skills T Based on the TEKS of the general education courses, these courses are modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Students are enrolled in these courses through ARD Committee placement. These courses review and build on basic skills and ideas of core academic subject matter. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). Students in the courses will take the required End-of-Course exams. Courses designated with G, Inclusion, Basic Courses designated with G or Inclusion indicate that the student receives special education support within a general education classroom. Students in G courses will take the End-of-Course STAAR tests. Students in inclusion and Basic will continue to take the required TAKS tests. Special Education Services Each local school has the responsibility for providing educational and related services to eligible students in the least restrictive environment. Students with disabilities have the opportunity to participate in educational programs and activities with students without disabilities. If a student has or is suspected of having a disability and requires specially designed instruction that can only be provided through special education, parents, teacher, administrators, or any other district employee should contact a campus counselor for information concerning the special education referral process. The school district curriculum enables each student with disabilities to acquire knowledge and skills in the basic areas of learning commensurate with the student’s needs and abilities. These skills may be attained in the general program of instruction or through special education modifications, accommodations, or instruction and related services, as determined by the admission, review, and dismissal (ARD) committee. Students with disabilities shall have available an instructional day commensurate with that of students without disabilities. The ARD committee shall determine the appropriate instructional setting for each student, and these shall be specified in the student’s Individual Educational Plan (IEP). The secondary program of a student receiving Special Education services shall terminate either with graduation or when the student no longer meets the age requirement for eligibility. Graduation constitutes a release from services and is a change in placement. Section 504 Services Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination and assures that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to non-disabled students. Eligible students have a record of, or are regarded as having, a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities including functions such as learning, self-care, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, working, and/or performing manual tasks. In order to receive services, even if the student has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity such as learning, communicating, or breathing, the student should be referred to the campus Section 504 team to determine appropriate and reasonable accommodations within the school. If a student has or is suspected of having a disability or requires special services, parents, teachers, administrators or any other district employee should contact the campus counselor for information. Dyslexia Services GISD offers services for students who, after participating in a screening process, are identified as dyslexic. The Dyslexia services are designed to provide comprehensive reading, writing, and spelling instruction for students who have been identified as dyslexic. The program provides a continuum of services that address phonemic awareness, grapho-phonemic knowledge, language structure, and linguistic patterns and processes. The Section 504 committee on each campus determines placement in the dyslexia program. TEC 38.003 Accelerated Learning (ACCELL) Any student who is at risk of failing as evidenced by multiple measures (such as STAAR/TAKS Reading or Mathematics scores, classroom grades, benchmark assessments, etc.) must participate in ACCELL Services. Students who qualify for ACCELL will receive one or more of the following services: tutorials, study skills, supplemental reading/writing, supplemental mathematics, dyslexia services, or other customized instructional support services. The delivery of ACCELL services will be customized based on students’ identified needs. The purpose of the ACCELL program is to assist students in mastery of the TEKS (State-mandated curriculum) through additional instruction on specific learning objectives for which students have not demonstrated mastery.
  • 7. 7 Required STAAR/TAKS /EOC Preparation Courses Any student (9-12) who fails any portion of the State assessment will be required to take a preparation course in lieu of an elective per Chapter 29 of the Texas Education Code. A student who fails any portion of the State assessment tests is considered by State statute as “at-risk” for dropping out of school. GISD must provide each student who does not pass STAAR/TAKS with accelerated instruction that will enable the student to perform at grade level at the conclusion of the next regular school term and a personal graduation plan to graduate on time. TEC 29.081 (a) and (b). Planning for College and Career Readiness National, state, and local attention is focused on raising educational expectations for high school students. Simply stated, all students must graduate from high school well prepared for college and a career. Nationally, the current administration is restructuring the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in order to support both state and local efforts to help ensure student success after high school graduation. States are being asked to ensure that the academic standards in the high school classroom will better prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace. The State of Texas has embraced the national challenge and is often seen as a national leader in its efforts to ensure that its high school students’ graduate from high school prepared for the challenges of postsecondary education and career. State standards for career and college readiness were jointly created by representatives from Texas public education, post-secondary education, and business community stakeholders. Georgetown Independent School District is committing resources to preparing all students for non-remedial coursework when entering a post-secondary program as well as supporting educational experiences through individualized, rigorous Programs of Study that will help prepare all students for college and ensure those who enter the workforce after high school completion will have had relevant postsecondary training and access to industry-recognized certifications. Defining College and Career Readiness College and career readiness means that our students will make a seamless transition between high school and college or the workforce. It also refers to the knowledge and skills students must demonstrate in the four critical areas of English, mathematics, science, and social studies, including reading, writing, critical thinking, and problem solving. College Ready College is typically thought of as a place where a student pursues a four-year bachelor’s degree. College today is a very broad terminology. If a student is college ready, he/she is prepared for any postsecondary education or training, including studying at two- and four-year institutions leading to a terminal degree such as certification, licensure, an Associate’s degree and/or a Bachelor’s degree. Being truly ready for college means that a high school graduate will have the academic, technical, and employability knowledge and skills necessary to enroll in and succeed in college without remediation in credit-bearing first-year postsecondary courses. Career Ready Careers are not just as a means to a paycheck. Students entering a career must have the same skills as a college ready student in order to succeed in postsecondary on-the-job experiences and education necessary to be successful in a chosen career area. Career ready students will have access to a variety of post-secondary opportunities and may choose to enroll in technical programs, community college or experience apprenticeships. Ultimately, the goal is for ALL students to enter a career. Careers provide a family-sustaining salary and provide pathways for career advancement in career areas that are projected to grow in the next five to ten years. Georgetown Independent School District is committed to preparing our students for success in a global economy. Regardless of student race, ethnic or language background, or disability, Georgetown ISD students will graduate from high school ready for college and a career. Further, we are dedicated to allowing our students access to a well- rounded education in order to prepare them to contribute as citizens in our community. A career-ready person effectively navigates pathways that connect education and employment to achieve a fulfilling, financially-secure and successful career. A career is more than just a job. Career readiness has no defined endpoint. To be career ready in our ever-changing global economy requires adaptability and a commitment to
  • 8. 8 lifelong learning, along with mastery of key academic, technical and workplace knowledge, skills and dispositions that vary from one career to another and change over time as a person progresses along a developmental continuum. Knowledge, skills and dispositions that are inter-dependent and mutually reinforcing are required. Defining the 4-Year Planning Process Four-year planning means planning out high school courses to take in order to (a) complete high school graduation requirements (b) gain perspective on post-secondary opportunities. The benefits to four-year-planning are limitless, but include awareness of your progress regarding general requirements and gaining a sense of direction. There are two things your student should keep in mind when considering four-year planning. First, with enough advanced planning, students will be able to fit in all of the requirements they need to graduate in four years. Second, four-year planning should be thought of as an ongoing process. It is normal for a student to change their plan as new opportunities develop or as roadblocks arise. Four-year planning is extremely helpful in putting the high school experience in perspective, looking at the future and realizing the possibilities that exist beyond high school. All Georgetown I.S.D. high school students will have the opportunity to create an individualized four-year Program of Study with counselors. Counselors will then monitor and adjust each student’s Program of Study annually. Students and Parents will have the opportunity to make changes during this annual review process and within the timeframe for schedule/course changes. Please follow your campus’ policy regarding course schedule/course changes.
  • 9. 9 Georgetown Independent School District For Ninth Grade Classes of 2014-15 and Thereafter GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS I. Students in GISD must complete a minimum of 28 credits at East View High School/ Georgetown High School and 26 credits at Richarte High School to receive a high school diploma. All credits must be completed in grades 9-12, except high school courses satisfactorily completed in grades 7 and/or 8. The Texas Education Agency requires 26 credits. All courses used to meet State graduation requirements must be selected from State Board of Education (SBOE)-approved courses, with the exception of some elective credits which may be locally approved. II. All courses in this catalog are State Board-approved unless noted as Local Credit Only. Locally developed electives (Local Credit Only) have been designed to meet an identified GISD need or interest. In grades 9-12, a student must complete all graduation requirements and pass the State required exit level exams before he/she is awarded a diploma. III. It is the student and parent’s responsibility to see that the requirements for graduation from high school are met. If you have any question about courses, registration, State-required exit level exams or other graduation requirements, contact the campus guidance department. IV. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college, students who are college-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate college entrance requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. V. Since employers have varying needs and requirements, students who are career-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and strive to meet future employment requirements by selecting an appropriate graduation plan. See Appendix B, page 101, for Graduation Plans for Ninth Grade Classes of 2013-14 and Prior Foundation High School Program (22 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 3 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, one credit in any advanced math course • 3 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any advanced science course • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 5 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 4.5 elective credits available) Foundation + Endorsements (28 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 4 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, two credits in any advanced math course except STEM • 4 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any two advanced science courses • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 9 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 8.5 elective credits available) Meet curriculum requirements for at least 1 endorsement Distinguished Level of Achievement (28 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 4 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, two credits in any advanced math course (must include credit in Algebra II) • 4 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any two advanced science courses • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 9 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 8.5 elective credits available) Meet curriculum requirements for at least 1 endorsement
  • 10. 10 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS I. High School Graduation Programs GISD offers students the opportunity to choose among State-mandated graduation requirement plans. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college and employers have varying needs and requirements, students should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate post-secondary entrance and entry level employment requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. Foundation High School Program The Foundation High School Program (FHSP) fulfills entrance requirements for most colleges and universities in the State of Texas and provides challenging academic courses. Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program The Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program (FEHSP) offers students the opportunity to earn an endorsement, or major course of study. The endorsement offers a student the ability to earn a total of 28 total credits (a combination of core requirements, local requirements and endorsement electives) in a targeted area of study for high school graduation. The five endorsement options for students are:  Arts and Humanities  Business and Industry  Public Service  STEM (Science and Math)  Multidisciplinary Distinguished Level of Achievement High School Program The Distinguished Level of Achievement High School Program (DLAHSP) recognizes students who complete the Foundation High School Program, complete an endorsement, and take Algebra II. Students must also complete an advanced measure requirement. Any combination of four of the following will meet the advanced measure requirements: Test data:  A score of three or above on The College Board Advanced Placement examination;  A score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination;  A score on the PSAT that qualifies a student for recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC); as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board; or as a part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the NMSC. College Courses:  A grade of B or a GPA of 3.0 or higher on courses that count for college credit, including articulated credit courses, dual credit courses, and co-enrollment courses. Original research/project: (Original research/ projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures.)  Judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of project; or  Conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience;  Related to the required curriculum set forth in TAC 74,1 relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Examples of Advanced Measures: Student completed course requirements and:  Four AP exams with scores of three or higher ;  One AP exam with a grade of three or higher, two college courses with a 3.0 GPA and a one-year mentorship program conducting a school-approved research product; or  A two-year science project reviewed by hospital board, one college science course with a 3.4 GPA and earned designation as a National Merit Scholar.
  • 11. 11 II. Graduation Credits Required Credits Students must earn a minimum of 28 credits at GHS and EVHS and 26 credits at Richarte High School to meet GISD graduation credit requirements. Credits and Records GISD shall accept all credits earned toward State graduation requirements by students in accredited Texas school districts, including credits earned in accredited summer school programs, in Texas Youth Commission education programs, and in juvenile justice alternative education programs. Credits earned in local credit courses may be transferred at the district’s discretion. Transfer students shall not be prohibited from attending school pending receipt of transcripts or academic records from the district the student previously attended. Records and transcripts of students from Texas nonpublic schools, from out of state or out of country schools (including foreign exchange students), private schools, and home schools shall be evaluated, and students shall be placed promptly in appropriate classes. The district may use a variety of methods to verify the content of courses for which a transfer student has earned credit. Upon enrollment in GISD, the academic advisor awards credits based on available student records and documentation. If necessary, the academic advisor may use a variety of methods for validation of credit that include, but are not limited to: released TAKS exams, recommendations from sending schools, credit by examinations, curriculum review, and course equivalency evaluation. III. Physical Education Substitute Credits A student may not earn more than four credits in physical education toward State graduation requirements. Students may substitute certain physical activities for Physical Education. The school district may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; and appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. Outside appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs can be substituted for PE with written approval from the district. Forms for requesting substitution of PE credit may be obtained in the counseling and guidance center at the campus. A school district may award up to four credits for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus which may be substituted for State graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:  Olympic-level participation and/or competition including a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training.  Private or commercially-sponsored and off-campus physical activities certified by the superintendent and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Instructors of such programs must submit the student’s grades in writing to the registrar by the first day of December and/or the first day of May in order for the student to receive credit for that semester. All grades will be recorded as Pass/Fail. IV. TAKS Exit-Level Exam Requirement for Graduation (Not for students entering high school 2011 or later): Texas State law has mandated that all non-exempt students must pass the exit-level test in order to receive a diploma. The exit-level TAKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) that contains tests of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies is administered each spring to all students in Grade 11. If a student does not pass a portion of the test, the failed portion of the test may be retaken each time the TAKS is administered on designated days during the fall, spring, and summer. After a student passes all sections of the test and meets all other graduation requirements, a diploma will be awarded. V. End-of-Course Assessments The Texas Education Agency implemented the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness program beginning with ninth grade students in the 2011-2012 school year. Students entering high school in 2014-2015 must show mastery on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills by achieving specified performance levels on five End-of-Course (EOC) tests before they graduate. Passing Requirements Students not meeting the passing score on any EOC test must retake the EOC assessment. Students not meeting passing requirements may retake the EOC assessments as many times as the tests are offered.
  • 12. 12 ACADEMIC PROGRAM INFORMATION I. Richarte High School Richarte High School is the academic, alternative school of choice for GISD. Richarte is registered as a State-accredited alternative campus with TEA. It is not a disciplinary campus, and students are not placed there by any other agency or school. Richarte offers students the opportunity to choose among State-mandated graduation requirement plans. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college and employers have varying needs and requirements, students should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate post-secondary entrance and entry level employment requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. Richarte HS does not offer a GED program. RHS serves students in grades 10-12 and a minimum age of 16 is required to apply. Teachers teach from the district adopted curriculum and use the same textbooks as other secondary campuses in GISD. The delivery of instruction, course syllabi, goal setting, and high level of student accountability allows students to move through requirements for some courses with flexibility, depending on the learning style and each individual student’s rate of mastering the content and concepts in each course. Students who attend RHS are considered at-risk for a myriad of factors including, but not limited to credit deficiency, difficulty succeeding in a traditional school environment, illness, family issues, or teen parenthood. Richarte seeks to prevent students from dropping out of school as well as to recover those who have already left the school system. A cap and gown graduation ceremony is held at the completion of each year at the Performing Arts Center located at Georgetown High School. Each graduating class has a valedictorian, salutatorian, and class rank. Valedictorian and Salutatorian/Honor Grad Selection The student making the highest four-year scholastic grade point weighted average is declared the valedictorian of the graduating class, provided he/she is enrolled, in regular attendance, and is a graduating senior. The student making the second highest four-year scholastic weighted average is declared the salutatorian of the graduating class provided he/she is enrolled, in regular attendance, and is a graduating senior. Both the salutatorian and valedictorian are declared toward the end of the last grading cycle of the fourth year. Students must complete their last, entire semester at Richarte High School. Any transferred grades not in numerical form and not available in numerical form will be granted mid-point scale. Early graduates are not eligible to be valedictorian or salutatorian. Semester grades of all subjects undertaken in grades 9-12 are used in calculating the four-year scholastic average with the following exceptions: driver education, student aide, athletics, physical education, choir, band, applied music, vocal ensemble, drill team, correspondence courses and co-op work periods. Summer school grades are not used in calculating the scholastic average; students receive credit only. Audited courses and courses repeated for review will not count for credit, but will be included in the scholastic average. II. Early Graduation A student may choose to graduate from high school in fewer than four years. To pursue early graduation, a student must make a written request to the academic advisor. Early graduation requirements include parent approval, principal approval, and a meeting with the counselor to file a written early graduation plan. III. College Preparatory and Credit Programs College preparatory courses are offered to students in subject areas at every grade level. These courses are designed for any and all students who have a desire to pursue a rigorous study in any subject area and want rigorous preparation for college. A. Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement Programs The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program offers high school students an opportunity to take college-level courses at the local high school. Upon successful completion of the course, the student receives high school credit with honors and, if the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced placement, credit, or both may be awarded upon college entrance. Although not required, GISD students enrolled in AP courses are expected to take the AP exam(s) at the completion of the course. Although college credit is a potential benefit of the AP course and exam, the experience alone, regardless of credit awarded, is beneficial to the college-bound student as a pre-college experience. Costs of these exams are borne by the student; however, financial assistance is available. For further information regarding the College Board AP Program at your high school, see a school counselor. It is recommended, but not required that students who elect to take AP courses participate in Pre-AP courses in 9th -11th grades. All Pre-AP and AP courses are listed in the Course Descriptions section of this Course Catalog. A minimum enrollment of 10 students is required for the class to be offered The AP Program also offers the AP International Diploma for students who plan to apply to an overseas university. For further information regarding the College Board AP Program at your high school, see a school counselor.
  • 13. 13 Eligibility Recommendations Pre-AP courses contain the levels of rigor necessary and provide readiness for the increased difficulty of the high school AP classes. Formal identification is not required to participate in Pre-AP and/or Advanced Placement courses. Careful consideration of the time demands of extracurricular activities, employment, community service, homework and other activities should be considered. If you have questions regarding whether or not this is the right course for you/your student, please contact your student’s teacher, counselor/academic advisor or campus administrator. To learn more about the Pre-AP and Advanced Placement programs go to: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com B. Early College Start - ACC Early College Start at Austin Community College allows juniors and seniors the opportunity to earn college credit while in high school. These courses are “dual credit” if used to satisfy the high school graduation requirement, “co- enrollment” if taken for college credit only, or “credit-in-escrow” if part of an approved ACCTech Articulation Agreement. Early College Start a good thing to consider for the following reasons:  Students get a head start on earning college credit.  Tuition and fees will be waived or reduced.  College-level work can enhance self-esteem, education, and career goals.  Most courses are transferable to other public colleges and universities. Students may enroll in college while still enrolled in high school to extend learning or accumulate college hours. To take college courses (co-enrollment or dual enrollment), students must receive counselor and parent approval and complete the college admissions requirements including college entrance exams and are responsible for the application and registration process. This process is time sensitive and may take one to four weeks to complete. Students must be considered full-time high school students. Students may enroll in two courses per college semester beginning the summer following their sophomore year. Students are responsible for any expenses associated with the course, including textbooks. Students should check with universities to ensure acceptance of specific dual or co-enrollment courses. All co-enrollment, dual credit and articulated courses may meet criteria for advanced measures in the Distinguished Achievement Program. Several Austin Community College (ACC) courses are offered during the school day and evenings at the ACC Georgetown Center (GTC) located on the GHS and EVHS campus. Other options are available outside of the school day. ACC classes are free—no tuition or fees are charged to high school students enrolled in the program on a GISD high school campus or on another local-area high school campus. There is a fee for each ACC course taken by distance learning or on an ACC campus. C. Dual Credit Enrollment Credit earned through dual credit enrollment counts for both college and high school credit. To receive credit, the grade in the course must be a D or better and students must submit an official transcript to the high school counseling office. The grade must be a B or better to use as an advanced measure on the Distinguished Achievement Program. If all conditions are met, credit is given for the course. GISD will follow the State requirements for the calculation of each student’s GPA. Listed in the chart found on the following two pages are the courses that are currently approved for dual credit with Austin Community College. This list is subject to change. Any college level course that a student completes can count as at least .5 elective credit for high school graduation requirements. Students should check with the campus guidance office for the most recent list of approved courses. D. Co-Enrollment Credit earned through co-enrollment counts only for college credit. Students who are granted release time for co-enrollment must meet all district requirements for graduation. Co-enrollment courses do not appear on a student’s high school transcript, do not count for high school graduation, and are not included in a student’s GPA, but will count as an advanced measure under the Distinguished Achievement Program if the student earned a B or higher grade for the course. The Texas Legislature has approved 42 core lower- division course credit hours that if completed through dual or co-enrollment will transfer to any Texas public college or university. This list can be found on the Austin Community College website. Students who plan to attend private or out of State schools should check with the schools on their policies of accepting dual or concurrent enrollment courses.
  • 14. 14 ACC # ACC Title High School Course HS Credit ACCT 2301 Principles of Financial Accounting Accounting I 1 ARTC 1402 Digital Imaging I Digital and Interactive Media 1 ARTS 1301 Introduction to Visual Arts Art I 1 ARTS 1303 Art History I Art History 1 ARTS 1316 Drawing I Art II-Drawing 1 ARTS 1317 Drawing II* Art III-Drawing 1 ARTS 2323 Life Drawing I* Art III-Drawing 1 ARTS 2316 Painting I* Art II-Painting 1 ARTS 2317 Painting II* Art III-Painting 1 ARTS 2326 Sculpture I Art II-Sculpture 1 ARTS 2327 Sculpture II* Art III-Sculpture 1 ARTS 2346 Ceramics I Art II-Ceramics 1 ARTS 2347 Ceramics II* Art III-Ceramics 1 ARTS 2356 Photography I* Art II-Photography 1 ARTS 2357 Photography II* Art II-Photography 1 ASTR 1303 Stellar Astronomy Astronomy 1 ASTR 1304 Solar System Astronomy Astronomy 1 BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications Business Info Management I 1 BIO 1614 Field Biology Environmental Systems 1 BIOL 2304 Human Anatomy* Anatomy and Physiology .5 BIOL 2305 Human Physiology* Anatomy and Physiology .5 BMGT 1303 Principles of Management Business Management (BUSMGMT) .5 BUSI 2301 Business Law Business Law .5 CETT 1403 DC Circuits* DC Circuits .5 CETT 1405 AC Circuits* AC Circuits .5 CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I Chemistry I 1 COMM 1307 Introduction to Mass Communication Journalism .5 COSC 1301 Personal Computing Business Info Management I 1 COSC 1315 Fundamentals of Programming Computer Science I 1 COSC 1320 C++ Programming* Computer Science II-1st sem. (TACS2) .5 COSC 2415 Data Structures* Computer Science II-2nd sem. .5 CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice Tech. Technical Intro. to Criminal Justice .5 CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices Courts and Criminal Procedures .5 CRIJ 1307 Crime In America Crime in America .5 CRIJ 1310 Fundamentals of Criminal Law Fundamentals of Criminal Law 1 CRIJ 2314 Criminal Investigation Criminal Investigation .5 DANC 1141 Ballet I Dance I 1 DANC 1147 Jazz Dance I Dance 1 DANC 1201 Dance composition Dance I 1 DANC 1245 Modern Dance Dance 1 DFTG 1405 Technical Drafting Intro to Engineering Design 1 DFTG 1417 Architectural-Residential* Architectural Graphics 1 DRAM 1330 Stagecraft Technical Theater 1 DRAM 1351 Acting I Theater Arts I 1 DRAM 1352 Acting II* Theater Arts II 1 DRAM 2331 Stagecraft II* Technical Theatre II 1 DRAM 2351 Acting III* Theatre Arts III 1 ECO 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics Economics .5 ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics Adv. Social Studies .5 ENGL 1301 English Composition I English III A .5 ENGL 1302 English Composition II English III B .5 ENGL 2307 Creative writing Creative Writing .5 ENGL 2322 British Literature I* English IV A&B (if yellow book completed) 1 ENGL 2323 British Literature II* English IV .5 ENGL 2327 American Literature I* English III .5 ENGL 2328 American Literature II* English III .5 ENVR 1301 Intro to Environmental Science Environmental Systems 1 FREN 1511 French I French I 1 FREN 1512 French II* French II 1 FREN 2311 French III* French III 1 FREN 2312 French IV* French IV 1 GEOG 1301 Physical Geography World Geography A .5
  • 15. 15 ACC # ACC Title High School Course HS Credit GEOG 1302 Cultural Geography World Geography B .5 GEOL 1403 Physical Geology Geology .5 GEOL 1404 Historical Geology Geology .5 GERM 1511 German I German I 1 GERM 1512 German II* German II 1 GERM 2311 German III* German III 1 GERM 2312 German IV* German IV 1 GOV 2305 U.S. Government Government .5 GOVT 2306 Texas State and Local Government Adv. Social Studies .5 HIST 1301 United States History I (to 1876) Adv. Social Studies .5 HIST 1302 United States History II (from 1877) U.S. History 1 HPRS 1206 Medical Terminology Medical Terminology .5 HUMA 1301 Introduction to Humanities Humanities .5 IBUS 1305 Intro. to International Business & Trade Global Business .5 IMED 1441 2-D Interface Design Digital and Interactive Media 1 ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Apps. Business Info Management I 1 JAPN 1511 Japanese I Japanese I 1 JAPN 1512 Japanese II* Japanese II 1 JAPN 2311 Japanese III* Japanese III 1 JAPN 2312 Japanese IV* Japanese IV 1 KINE 11XX Physical activity courses PE equivalent I-IV .5 each KINE 1305 Community Health Health Ed .5 LATI 1511 Latin I Latin I 1 LATI 1512 Latin II* Latin II 1 LATI 2311 Latin III* Latin III 1 LATI 2312 Latin IV* Latin IV 1 MATH 1316 Trigonometry Pre-calculus A .5 MATH 2412 Pre-calculus Pre-calculus B .5 MATH 1342 Elementary Statistics Statistics 1 MATH 1425 Business Calculus I AP Calculus A .5 MATH 1476 Business Calculus II AP Calculus B .5 MATH 2413 Calculus I AP Calculus A .5 MATH 2414 Calculus II AP Calculus B .5 MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing Principles of Marketing .5 PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy Philosophy .5 PHYS 1311 Stellar Astronomy Astronomy 1 PHYS 1312 Solar System Astronomy Astronomy 1 PHYS 1401 General College Physics Physics I 1 PSYC 2301 Introduction to Psychology Psychology .5 SLNG 1401 American Sign Language: Beginning I Sign Language I 1 SLNG 1402 American Sign Language: Beginning II* Sign Language II 1 SNLG 2301 American Sign Language III Sign Language III 1 SNLG 2302 American Sign Language IV Sign Language IV 1 SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology Sociology .5 SPAN 1511 Spanish I Spanish I 1 SPAN 1512 Spanish II* Spanish II 1 SPAN 2311 Spanish III* Spanish III 1 SPAN 2312 Spanish IV* Spanish IV 1 SPCH 1311 Intro. to Speech Communications Communications Apps. .5 SPCH 1315 Fundamentals of Public Speaking Public Speaking .5 WLDG 1405 Art Metals Jewelry II 1 *ACC course has prerequisite requirements. Only courses listed in the course guide are pre-approved for dual credit. Other ACC courses may be approved for high school credit. Students should check with the campus guidance office for more information.
  • 16. 16 E. ACCTech (Formerly referred to as Tech Prep) ACCTech is a program which allows students the opportunity to earn college credit for approved career and technical education (CTE) high school courses and begin a college technical major in high school. In the ACCTech program, students begin a course of study in high school and continue in a community or technical college. The result is a certificate or associate degree in a career field. ACCTech combines the academic courses needed for success in college AND technical courses that begin to prepare you for a career. Through ACCTech, G.I.S.D. is able to achieve program articulation with Austin Community College. Articulation is a planned process linking high school and college courses to assist students in making a smooth transition from one level of education to another without experiencing delays or duplication in learning. Approved ACCTech programs have articulation agreements, which are signed documents that indicate the specific responsibilities of the high school, college, and student. The agreements also include outlines of a Recommended High School Graduation Plan and a two-year associate degree or technical certificate. Together these are called a 6-Year Plan. ACCTech articulated courses are high school courses that contain the same course content as an equivalent college course, and for which a student is eligible for college credit once requirements are met. In order for students to receive articulated college credit through ACCTech, students must:  Enroll in ACCTech (articulated) courses  While taking the ACCTech course in high school, set up an account on the (CATEMA) www.catema.net/capital website  Earn a 3.0 (80) or better in the course  To claim ACCTech credits, enroll at ACC as an Early College Start or traditional student and complete one class (three semester hours)  After you complete one class (three semester hours) as an ACC student, your credit is uploaded from the (CATEMA) www.catema.net/capital website onto your ACC transcript
  • 17. 17 ACCTech Articulated Course Agreements ACC Course # Austin Community College Title Credit GHS Course Title HS Credit ACNT 1403 Introduction to Accounting I 4 Accounting I 1 ARTC 1402 Digital Imaging I 4 Digital and Interactive Media (DIM) 1 ARTC 1413 Digital Publishing I 4 Web Technologies 1 AUMT 1405 Introduction to Automotive Technology 4 Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems 1 AUMT 1416 AUMT 1407 Suspension & Steering AND Automotive Electrical Systems 4 4 Advanced Automotive Technology 2 AUMT 2417 AUMT 1410 Automotive Engine Performance Analysis I AND Automotive Brake Systems 4 4 Automotive Technology 2 BITC 1411 Introduction to Biotechnology 4 Advanced Biotechnology 1 BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 Business Management 1 BUSG 2309 Small Business Management 3 Entrepreneurship 1 CDEC 1321 CDEC 1311 The Infant and Toddler Educating Young Children 3 3 Child Guidance (Required Prerequisite(s): Child Development) 2 .5 CETT 1425 Digital Fundamentals 4 Digital Electronics (PLTW-DE) 1 CHEF 1205 Sanitation and Safety 2 Culinary Arts 2 CHEF 1301 Basic Food Preparation 3 Culinary Arts with ServSafe Certification 2 CJSA 1348 Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 Law 1 1 CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Principles of Law 1 CRIJ 1310 Law II 3 Fundamentals of Criminal Law 3 CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices 3 Courts and Systems 1 ENGR 1201 Introduction to Engineering 2 Principles of Engineering (PLTW- POE) 1 GRPH 1359 Vector Graphics for Production 4 Graphic Design and Illustration 1 IBUS 1305 International Business & Trade 3 Global Business .5 ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Applications I 3 Business Information Management I (BIM I) OR Business Information Management II (BIM II) 1 1 WLDG 1425 Introduction to Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting 4 Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication 1 WLDG 1428 Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies 1 Current Georgetown ISD Articulation agreements with Austin Community College may be viewed at: http://www.austincc.edu/acctech/documents/GeorgetownISD.php
  • 18. 18 Methods to Earn College Credit in High School Comparison Description Advantages Disadvantages The College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) The College Board Advanced Placement Program is a nationally recognized program for introducing students to college-level work while they are still in high school. Students who enroll in higher-level academic courses identified for Advanced Placement may be eligible to receive college credit based on high school course grades and performance on national AP examinations. Colleges and universities publish policies for award of AP credit or AP advanced placement in their bulletins.  Exposure to college-level coursework  Student AP exam score of 3 or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  Recognized at colleges and universities nationwide  Large selection of academic courses is included in the AP Program  State-sponsored incentive program for participating school districts  Students receive weighted points toward their class rank  Applies to AP designated academic courses only  College Board AP examination fee required  Students must score a 3 or above on AP exam to count as an advanced measure, potentially delaying award of Distinguished Achievement Seal  Award of credit or advanced placement at colleges and universities varies depending on examination scores  Secondary schools may be limited in AP course offerings and course scheduling options.  ACCTech The ACCTech program was created to provide a method for high school students to receive technical training in high school. Students may begin a workforce/technical program and by successfully demonstrating college-level competence in content-enhanced high school courses are eligible to receive banked (in escrow) credit for courses that are part of an associate degree or certificate plan. Some four-year universities may also honor these courses.  Exposure to college-level coursework while completing high school credits  Course grade of 3.0 (80) or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  Recognized at many public two and four-year colleges across the State  Large selection of career and technical education courses and some academic courses  Students begin a college technical major in high school  Designed to meet Austin Community College program requirements  Based on courses offered by both the high school and Austin Community College  No tuition and/or fees  Student must earn a 3.0 (80) or better in the course  Credit in escrow until a student completes three semester hours of additional college- level coursework as an Austin Community College student  Transfer of credit to four-year universities may be limited  Secondary schools may be limited in articulated career and technical education or academic course offerings and course scheduling options  Award of credit may depend upon local agreements Early College Start Students may earn college credit through Early College Start program. The Early College Start program allows a junior or senior student to enroll in college while still in high school and register tuition- free or at a reduced tuition rate for college courses that may count for both high school and college credit. Students who participate in the Early College Start program must meet College Readiness Standards.  Exposure to college courses often taught on college campus  Course grade of 3.0 or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  College credit is awarded on successful completion of course requirements  Early college admission  Enhanced course transferability  Austin Community College waives tuition and fees for courses taken at any high school campus and charges $40 per course for dual credit courses taken at ACC facilities.  Austin Community College offers Junior and Senior level English and Social Studies courses on campus during the school day at Georgetown and Georgetown East View High Schools   Students must meet college admission requirements  Students must meet college basic skills assessment requirements  Students are generally limited to taking two concurrent college courses each semester  Students may be subject to college tuition and fees  Students may need to travel to a college campus Credit by Examination Credit by examination or for experience offers students an opportunity to demonstrate college-level knowledge and earn college credit or advanced placement by examination, or by petitioning a college or university for credit after documentation of appropriate experience. Students demonstrate knowledge by taking College Board CLEP exams (academic courses) or college or university departmental exams (academic and technical courses).  No specific course enrollment required  Students may opt to take an examination for credit at any time  CLEP examination scores accepted at colleges and universities nationwide  Large selection of CLEP examinations for academic courses  High school students can bank CLEP examination scores pending college enrollment  CLEP examinations are offered for academic courses only  CLEP examination fees are required. Colleges may also charge tuition or fees for credit by departmental examination or for experience  Colleges and universities may have different policies regarding award of credit for CLEP examinations  Not all college or university departments offer credit by departmental examination or experience
  • 19. 19 IV. Alternative Methods for High School Credit Correspondence Courses All high school students may take correspondence courses and earn credit toward graduation. Prior to enrollment in correspondence courses, students must make written request to the principal or designee for approval to enroll in the course through their guidance counselor. Credit toward State graduation requirements shall be granted only under the following conditions: 1. The institution offering the course is The University of Texas, Texas Tech University, the Texas Virtual Network, or other public institution of higher education approved by the Commissioner of Education. AND 2. The correspondence course includes the State-required Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for such a course. GISD will follow State requirements for the calculation of each student’s GPA. Seniors who are enrolled in correspondence courses to earn units required for graduation shall complete the course and submit the grade for recording at least 30 days prior to the graduation date in order to be eligible for graduation at the end of the term. A correspondence course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the registrar’s office at the campus. The costs of correspondence courses are the responsibility of the student and/or the parents/guardians. Note: Correspondence courses are not included in determining NCAA eligibility. V. Grade Point Average and Class Rank Grade Point Average (GPA) GPA is calculated at the end of each semester beginning with the end of the first semester of a student’s freshman year. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated for each student using a simple grading system. Grade points are awarded based on the grading system outlined in the GISD Grading Regulations. A = 90-100 B = 80-89 C = 70-79 F = Failing (Below 70) The GPA is a cumulative average of all semester or final grades earned in selected courses in high school. The semester averages of all State-approved courses and elective courses will be included in the calculation of the GPA with the exception of the following courses: driver education, student aide, cheerleading, test preparation (SAT Prep), athletics, physical education, choir, band, orchestra, dance courses, color guard, drill team, and all pass/fail courses. Summer school grades are not used in calculating the GPA. Audited courses and courses repeated for review will not count for credit, but will not be included in the scholastic average. GPA Calculation Example: 1st semester Pre-AP English I 88 1st semester Algebra I 72 1st semester Athletics 94 1st semester Biology 91 GPA (unweighted) 83.66 The sample GPA is the straight average of the semester grades in English I, Algebra I, and Biology divided by 3 (courses). Athletics does not count in the GPA. The sample GPA is 83.66. The GPA is commonly referred to as an “unweighted” GPA and will provide easily usable information to colleges and universities. Academic Class Rank Calculation A Weighted GPA (WGPA) is used to determine a class rank for each student. Class rank indicates the student’s academic standing relative to his/her peers (Valedictorian, Salutatorian, top ten percent, top quarter, second quarter, third quarter and fourth quarter). An exact numerical class rank is reported for each student. The WGPA is determined by the semester or final grades earned in the courses specified in the GISD class rank policies. Course choice has an impact on class ranking. Students earn grade points for each class they take. The number of grade points earned in the class is determined by the numerical grade earned and by the weighted levels of rigor of specific courses.
  • 20. 20 Note: The GPA will not necessarily predict a student’s class rank. A student may have a lower GPA, but a higher Weighted GPA class rank than another student due to the courses included and weighted grades for specified courses used in calculating class rank. Courses Counted in Class Rank The District shall calculate a student's class rank using only credits earned in the following content areas as defined by the TEKS:  English  Mathematics  Science  Social Studies  Foreign Language (Languages Other Than English) For students entering grade 9 during the 2011–12 school year and thereafter, class rank shall be determined by descending order of students’ weighted grade point averages earned in the following curriculum categories: 1. Four courses in English/language arts; 2. Up to four courses in mathematics; 3. Four courses in science; 4. Four courses in social studies; and 5. Up to two courses in Languages other than English (LOTE). If a student completes more than 18 courses within these five categories specified above, the student’s weighted GPA used for class rank shall be calculated using the student’s grades within each category with the highest grade point value. Calculations will be based on semesters with each semester of a course counting as ½ credit. Calculations for GPA will include up to the top eight semesters of the four core areas. Grades earned in the following courses shall be excluded when calculating the weighted GPA and academic class rank:  Correspondence courses  Summer school courses  Credit by examination  Credit for acceleration  Credit recovery courses  Home school  Distance learning  Online learning  Courses taken in foreign countries  Pass/fail courses  Private schools and/or non-accredited schools The weighted GPA is determined by semester grades earned in the core courses (English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Languages Other Than English). Core level courses are calculated based on a 5.0 scale. Advanced academic courses (GT, Pre-AP, AP, dual credit, college courses) are calculated on a 6.0 scale. Elective courses and local credit courses are not included in the calculation of the weighted GPA and academic class rank. Weighted GPA Class Rank Calculation Each course is coded to show its weight based on the following categories: ADVANCED COURSES: These courses include academic courses specifically designated for students identified as Gifted and Talented, College Board Advanced Placement Courses, Pre-Advanced Placement Courses, dual credit, college courses, and other appropriate advanced courses. CORE COURSES: Core courses provide grade-level instruction in 100% of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as outlined in the State Board approved well-balanced curriculum. GISD core courses exceed the minimum expectations through various curricular and instructional strategies. These courses are designed for college-bound as well as career-bound students.
  • 21. 21 MODIFIED COURSES: These courses provide instruction in less than 100% of the TEKS. Modifications are provided through content as well as methodology, pacing, and materials. LOCAL COURSES: No weight is assigned for local courses. For purposes of class rank, a six-point system shall be used to calculate the student’s Weighted GPA. The Weighted GPA determines a student’s rank in class. Students receiving credit for advanced courses will receive an additional grade point. This is reflected in the chart in the column labeled Advanced. Courses that have been modified by the student’s ARD committee as to the required content of the TEKS shall not earn the same number of grade points as core or advanced. This is reflected in the chart below in the column labeled Modified Curriculum. Please see chart below for a calculation example. WGPA for Class Rank Calculation Example: (1) Look at the semester or final average for each course. (2) Determine if the course counts in the WGPA. (3) If so, find that grade on the following chart. (4) Determine whether the course is Modified, Core, or Advanced and use the appropriate grade point for that course. (5) Total the grade points and divide by the number of semester courses counted. This will give you the WGPA that is used in Class Rank. WGPA Calculation Scale for Class Rank Semester Grade Advanced Core Modified Curriculum 100 6.0 5.0 4.0 99 5.9 4.9 3.9 98 5.8 4.8 3.8 97 5.7 4.7 3.7 96 5.6 4.6 3.6 95 5.5 4.5 3.5 94 5.4 4.4 3.4 93 5.3 4.3 3.3 92 5.2 4.2 3.2 91 5.1 4.1 3.1 90 5.0 4.0 3.0 89 4.9 3.9 2.9 88 4.8 3.8 2.8 87 4.7 3.7 2.7 86 4.6 3.6 2.6 85 4.5 3.5 2.5 84 4.4 3.4 2.4 83 4.3 3.3 2.3 82 4.2 3.2 2.2 81 4.1 3.1 2.1 80 4.0 3.0 2.0 79 3.9 2.9 1.9 78 3.8 2.8 1.8 77 3.7 2.7 1.7 76 3.6 2.6 1.6 75 3.5 2.5 1.5 74 3.4 2.4 1.4 73 3.3 2.3 1.3 72 3.2 2.2 1.2 Semester Grade Advanced Core Modified Curriculum 71 3.1 2.1 1.1 70 3.0 2.0 1.0 Below 70 0 0 0 Local courses are not included in weighted GPA and class rank calculations. WGPA for Class Rank Calculation Example: Course Semester Average WGPA Calculation Pre-AP English I Sem. 1 92 5.2 Sem. 2 96 5.6 Pre-AP Biology Sem. 1 86 4.6 Sem. 2 95 5.5 Pre-AP World Geo. Sem. 1 95 5.5 Sem. 2 89 4.9 Geometry Sem. 1 88 3.8 Sem. 2 94 4.4 PE (substitute) Sem. 1 P Art I Sem. 2 95 Dig. & Inter. Media Sem. 1 92 Sem. 2 89 Band Sem. 1 99 Sem. 2 100 Total WGPA Points – 39.5 WGPA .5 Credits - 8 WGPA = Total Points 39.5/8 = 4.9375 GPA = 91.9 GPA is the straight average of semester grades in eligible courses.
  • 22. 22 Advanced Courses Advanced courses receive an additional grade point for calculation of a student’s GPA. See Appendix A for a listing of advanced courses. Academic Achievement Class Ranking Class Rank High school rank for students seeking automatic admission to a general teaching institution on the basis of their class rank is determined and reported as follows: 1.Class rank shall be based on the end of the eleventh grade, middle of the twelfth grade, or at high school graduation, whichever is most recent at the application deadline. 2.The top ten percent of a high school class shall not contain more than ten percent of the total class size. 3.The student's rank shall be reported by the applicant's high school or school district as a specific number out of a specific number total class size. Class rank shall be determined by the Texas school or school district from which the student graduated or is expected to graduate. 19 TAC 5.5(d) A class rank is computed for students each semester beginning in the ninth grade; however, class ranking for college admission purposes, weighted academic class ranking, shall be based on the end of eleventh grade, middle of twelfth grade, or at high school graduation, whichever is most recent at the application deadline. The final calculation for rank in class will be made at the end of the year using final semester grades. Transfer Student Grades All incoming students' GPAs shall be converted to the system used by the District to determine the GPA and rank in class. Early Graduates and Beyond 4-Year Continuers A student's rank in class shall be determined within the graduating class of the school year in which the student completes all requirements for a diploma, regardless of the number of years the student is enrolled in high school. Valedictorian and Salutatorian The valedictorian and salutatorian shall be selected at the end of the second semester of the senior year. The valedictorian and the salutatorian shall be the two graduating seniors with the highest rank in class (weighted grade point average). To be eligible, a student shall have been enrolled in the District for the entire last four semesters prior to graduation and shall have accrued at least 24 units of State-approved or equivalent credit from a public school. Both the failing grade and the passing grade in courses subsequently retaken and passed, including credit by examination, shall be considered. Students suspended from school, assigned to a DAEP, or expelled from school at the time of graduation may be designated the class valedictorian or salutatorian, but shall not be permitted to participate in the graduation activity resulting in forfeiture of the privilege of giving a speech at the graduation ceremony. To qualify for valedictorian or salutatorian, the student must graduate in no more than, or fewer than, four years. Breaking a Tie for Valedictorian/Salutatorian In case of a tie the following method shall be used to determine who shall be recognized as valedictorian or salutatorian: 1. Compute the weighted grade point average to the maximum number of decimal places in the District computer system to break the tie. 2. If a tie still occurs, the student with the most AP courses shall be considered valedictorian or salutatorian. If a tie still occurs, the student with the highest numerical weighted grade averages of all Advanced Placement courses taken shall be valedictorian or salutatorian. Top Ten Percent of a Graduating Class All students whose rank in class make up the top ten percent of the graduating class and qualify for automatic admission under Education Code 51.803 shall be recognized. Eligibility standards required for the local procedure for determining valedictorian and salutatorian shall not apply to the procedure for determining top ten percent. Breaking Ties for Top Ten Percent In case of a tie for the top ten percent, the method for breaking a tie for valedictorian or salutation shall apply. Honors to be Earned The district recognizes the valedictorian, salutatorian, top ten percent, National Honor Society students, Texas scholars and candidates for the Distinguished Achievement Graduation Program.
  • 23. 23 REQUIRED STATE ASSESSMENTS FOR GRADUATION STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2010-2011 OR EARLIER TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills) Exit-Level Exam Requirement for Graduation: Texas state law has mandated that all non-exempt students must pass the exit-level test in order to receive a diploma. The exit-level TAKS contains tests of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies and is administered each spring to all students in Grade 11. If a student does not pass any subject area(s) of the test, that portion of the test may be retaken each time the TAKS is administered on designated days during the fall, spring, and summer. After a student passes all sections of the test and meets all other graduation requirements, a diploma will be awarded STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2011-2012 OR LATER STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) End-of-Course (EOC) Requirements for Graduation: In 2007 Senate Bill 1031 was enacted, which called for development of end-of-course assessment instruments. These EOC assessments became part of the graduation requirements beginning with the freshman class of 2011-2012. The tests a student is required to take and the required scores are determined by the State. Each EOC exam will have a designated satisfactory performance score. If the student does not meet the score requirement, the student will be required to retake the test. Students not passing the EOC may retest during scheduled testing administrations. GENERAL INFORMATION I. Grade Level Classifications For the purpose of classifying students: Freshman: A student promoted/assigned to the 9th grade. Sophomore: A student must have completed 6 credits. Junior: A student must have completed 12 credits. Senior: A student must have completed 18 credits. This classification is based on the number of credits actually completed by the beginning of the school year. Credits earned through summer school, credit-by-exam, or correspondence should be on file in the registrar’s office by the first day of school for classification purposes. A correspondence course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the registrar’s office. Please consult the campus principal for further clarification regarding extracurricular eligibility requirements. Students are not reclassified during the school year except for:  Students who have fallen behind their graduation cohort and who have earned the minimum number of credits required for a higher classification will be reclassified at the end of the first semester.  Students who plan to graduate at the end of their junior year who have submitted an early graduation plan to their counselor will be reclassified as seniors at the end of the first semester if minimum credit requirements have been met. II. Schedule Changes Requests for schedule changes for the upcoming school year can be made from pre-registration through last day of the current school year. Schedule change requests over summer break may be made by phone or email to the student’s counselor/academic advisor or in person during the formal schedule change request period in August prior to the beginning of school. Dates and times for formal schedule changes in August will be posted on the GISD website under the heading Registration Schedule Information. Requests for schedule changes will be considered up to the first ten school days of each semester. Schedule changes requested after the first ten school days of the school semester may constitute a loss in credit for the semester per the 90% attendance laws. Any schedule change requests made after the first ten days of the semester due to an extenuating circumstance must be approved by the
  • 24. 24 student’s grade level principal before any changes can be made. After the first 10 days of school, students who choose to transfer from a Pre-AP or AP course to a regular course can submit a request after the 4th week of the semester. All changes will be completed by the end of the 1st grading period. After this deadline, no schedule changes will be made until the end of the semester. When a student transfers from a Pre-AP, and/or AP course to a core academic course or from a core academic course to an advanced course, the grades earned in the original class will be transferred as earned without alteration. Student schedules will not be changed to select different teachers, lunch periods, or a previously selected elective, or for other preferential reasons. Schedule corrections will be considered only if a student fails to satisfy prerequisites, the school has made an error, a scheduling conflict exists, a student successfully completes summer school, credit-by-exam or correspondence courses, or due to other extenuating circumstances. Since parents are involved in the initial selection of courses, requests for changes in schedules should be signed by the parents. All schedule changes must be approved by the principal or designee. III. Semester System The school year is divided into two semesters with two nine-week reporting periods in each semester. The semester grade average is determined by the two nine-week averages and the semester final exam. For courses that are two semesters in duration, the two semester grades will be averaged to determine total credit for the course. A passing grade for one semester may bring up a failing grade in the other semester if the yearly average is 70 or higher. Students earn .5 credit per period per semester for coursework toward graduation requirements if they: 1) have earned a 70 or higher average and 2) have been in attendance at least 90% of the days the class is offered. The student handbook outlines alternative ways for students to make up work or regain credit lost because of absences. IV. Suspension from Extracurricular Activities A student shall be suspended from participation in any extracurricular activities sponsored or sanctioned by the district or the UIL after a grade eligibility period in which the student received a failing grade (lower than 70) in any class. A student who received a grade lower than 70 in a class identified as advanced by board policy may be eligible to participate in an extracurricular activity. See GISD board policy for eligibility requirements. COLLEGE INFORMATION Automatic Admissions Top Ten Percent HB 3826 requires that students in the top ten percent of their high school graduating class are eligible for automatic admission to public institutions of higher education in Texas only if they have completed the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement Program and complete the college application requirements. (University of Texas at Austin may have a percentage for automatic admission that will change from year to year.) Occasionally, changes occur in course requirements due to action by the Texas Legislature and/or the Texas State Board of Education. The counselors will communicate to students any changes in requirements that could impact graduation requirements. Otherwise, students will graduate with the course requirements in place when entering the ninth grade. College Entrance Exams PSAT, SAT, and ACT In addition to taking rigorous courses in high school, students should prepare themselves for college entrance exams. College entrance exams include the College Board’s SAT and the ACT. The SAT assesses verbal and mathematical reasoning skills students have developed over time and skills they need to be successful in college. Preparation for the SAT begins with the PSAT, or Preliminary SAT. By taking the PSAT in both 10th and 11th grades, students have two opportunities to practice for the SAT. Students may receive information from potential colleges through the Student Search Service. They may also recognize potential in AP courses through analysis of their PSAT scores. In addition, the PSAT score on the test taken during the junior year is used for qualification for the National Merit Scholarship Competition. Both the PSAT and the SAT measure verbal reasoning skills, critical reading skills and math problem-solving skills. Students receive feedback on their PSAT results that can help them identify strengths and weaknesses in preparing for the SAT. Information about the PSAT and the SAT can be found at www.collegeboard.com. Another college entrance exam, the ACT, assesses high school students’ general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. Writing is not a component of the general ACT exam. There is an optional writing test that measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. More information about ACT can be found at www.act.org. GISD provides students with the opportunity to take the PSAT each October. SAT and ACT are offered on various dates and locations throughout the year. GHS and EVHS are not ACT or SAT test sites. For more information on PSAT, SAT and ACT contact the school counselor.
  • 25. 25 College Connection College Connection is a partnership between Austin Community College and GISD that promotes college access and success. College Connection increases the number of GISD graduates entering college by taking seniors through the college application and enrollment process at ACC. The college application process can be intimidating for students. The goal is to remove the “mystery” of how college entrance works. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in events that include assistance with the ACC admission application, financial aid, ASSET/COMPASS placement testing, tours of ACC campuses, orientation and advising. Graduating seniors will receive a lifetime letter of acceptance to ACC as part of their graduation portfolio packet. Students who complete the College Connection program are not required to attend ACC, but will graduate from GHS, EVHS or Richarte High School with acceptance to ACC. CLEP Exams College Board CLEP Exams offered at individual college campuses and/or SAT II subject exams offered to students while they are still in high school provide students an opportunity to demonstrate college-level knowledge and earn college credit or advanced placement by examination. Students demonstrate knowledge by taking College Board CLEP exams (academic courses) or college or university departmental exams (academic and technical courses). Check with the college of your choice for specific information.
  • 26. 26 GRADUATION GRADE LEVEL PLANNING GRADE LEVEL INFORMATION FRESHMAN: Students in the ninth grade will take English I, Algebra I or Geometry (for those students who earned Algebra I credit in middle school), Biology, and World Geography. Other courses include: Health, PE, a fine arts course, a foreign language course or a Career & Technical Education course. SOPHOMORE: Tenth grade requirements include English II, World History, Geometry or Algebra II, and Biology or Chemistry. Other requirements that need to be taken over the next two years include PE, a fine arts course, and a foreign language course if these are not yet completed. Select electives with the goal of completing a Program of Study. Make note of the prerequisites of courses that you may want to take as an eleventh grader to ensure that these are being met. JUNIOR: Eleventh grade students should carefully check required courses for the Recommended High School Graduation Program and make sure the proper courses have been selected. Courses include English III, U. S. History, and the third math and Chemistry or Physics. Numerous Advanced Placement and Dual Credit courses are available. All selections should be made with an ultimate career goal or college major in mind. State Testing Requirements: Students must meet state standards on all EOC-tested subjects. Other Testing: PSAT in October; SAT/ACT in the Spring (recommended); AP Exams if coursework has been completed SENIOR: It is critical that each student, and his or her parent, review very carefully the requirements for graduation to ensure the proper classes are selected to meet graduation requirements (see page 8 of course catalog). Courses include English IV, Government, Economics, and the fourth math and science if not previously completed. The counselor will work diligently with you to select the proper classes, but remember that your graduation is ultimately your responsibility. Opportunities to retake classes previously failed will inhibit your options to take elective courses. By your senior year, you should have plans for after graduation, so be sure your course selections adequately prepare you for your future plans. College: Choose 3-5 schools: one dream school that may seem like a stretch, one sure thing, and several choices in between. Make sure you meet the admissions requirements and are registered for the proper entrance exams. Apply early. Do not wait until just before the deadline or you may be too late. Technical School: Check with several different schools to make sure they have the kind of training you are looking for. Compare their job placement rates and financial aid opportunities to determine which school is your best choice. Military: Talk to recruiters from several branches of the services. See which one offers you the best opportunities. Make an appointment to take the ASVAB, and keep in touch with the recruiter of the branch you select. Work: Make sure you have adequate job skills for a career with a future, not just a temporary job. See if the benefits plan offers incentives for further education within the field. Testing: Exit-Level TAKS - All or any parts if not yet passed at 11th grade; SAT/ACT in the fall (recommended); AP Exams if coursework has been completed; ASSET/COMPASS Exam through ACC College Connection (if desired or needed) Remember… All graduation requirements, including passing all parts of TAKS or meeting minimum and cumulative score requirements on EOC, must be met before you can receive your diploma. If you have earned all required graduation credits, but not passed all sections of TAKS or met cumulative score requirements on EOC, you may receive a certificate of credit completion, but will not receive your high school diploma. 9th 11th 10th 12th
  • 27. 27 GEORGETOWN ISD 4-YEAR GRADUATION PLANNING DOCUMENT Name: Date: Career Programs of Study: ___________________ 9th Grade 10th Grade Summer 11th Grade Summer 12th Grade ENGLISH I ENGLISH II ENGLISH III ENGLISH IV MATH MATH MATH MATH SCIENCE SCIENCE SCIENCE SCIENCE WORLD GEOGRAPHY WORLD HISTORY U.S. HISTORY GOVERNMENT/ ECONOMICS See current plan on Career Cruising: www.careercruising.com Contact the campus counselor/academic advisor for additional assistance. Contact Richarte High School for RHS Intake Requirements.
  • 28. 28 HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CAPSTONE RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE, OR SOCIAL STUDIES (Weighted) Credit: See below Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Identified Gifted and Talented  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGLISH (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DESIGN (1-3 Credits)  SOCIAL STUDIES RESEARCH METHODS (.5-2 Credits)  SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED STUDIES (.5-2 Credits)  ECONOMICS ADVANCED STUDIES (.5-1 Credit) These independent study courses are designed for gifted and talented students in grades 9-12 and will greatly enhance the opportunities for the production of advanced academic products through guided, multidisciplinary research. These courses are based on the TEA performance standards for gifted and talented students that were enacted by Rider 69 in 1999 in the Texas legislature. A project that consists of the long-term development of a question or idea that is significant to professionals in the academic area of interest will be the focal point of these courses. Sophisticated research methods and technology appropriate to the field of study will be used. The project must demonstrate creative mastery of content through a final product of professional quality. The final product, which is scored by judges, may be a written product, public performance and/or presentation. Students who successfully complete a project will earn independent study credit in the chosen discipline. Each course may be repeated with different course content for up to the maximum number of credits specified above. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS (Weighted) Credit: .5-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Identified Gifted/Talented, Algebra II, Geometry, and concurrent enrollment or credit in Pre-Calculus This course is rigorous, fast-paced and designed to challenge the mathematically gifted student. This course will extend mathematical understanding beyond the Algebra II level in a specific area or areas of mathematics, such as theory of equations, number theory, non- Euclidian geometry, discrete mathematics, advanced survey of mathematics, or history of mathematics. This course will provide students opportunities to pursue interest in mathematical topics via independent research, directed learning, preparation for and participation in challenging mathematics competitions, and/or mentoring by a mathematics professional. Students may repeat this course with different course content for up to 3 credits. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 2 high school information technology courses Students gain advanced knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, implementation, maintenance, evaluation, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper use of analytical skills and application of information technology concepts and standards are essential to prepare students for success in a technology-driven society. Critical thinking, information technology experience, and product development may be conducted in a classroom setting with an industry mentor, as an unpaid internship, or as career preparation. INDEPENDENT STUDIES
  • 29. 29 LANGUAGE ARTS ENGLISH I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): None The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English I, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis. PRE-AP ENGLISH I (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): Required Summer Reading, See Pre AP/AP Guidelines Pre-AP English I follows the basic English I curriculum. This course prepares students for the college level Advanced Placement program by emphasizing the higher level critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation and synthesis. The assignments for reading and writing increase in length and complexity; and products that demonstrate learning may include advanced vocabulary study, research projects, in and out of class reading, and challenging classroom discussions REQUIRED SUMMER READING: Pre-AP and AP English classes will assess comprehension during the first three weeks of school through an objective exam and a written essay. ENGLISH II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): English I The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English II, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis. PRE-AP ENGLISH II (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): English I, Required Summer Reading, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines. The Pre-AP English II course is designed to further develop, and refine the strands of English language arts instruction which consists of the development of vocabulary including inferring word meanings; reading comprehension; writing a variety of written texts including expository essays and persuasive papers that mention counter-arguments; research; listening and speaking; and oral and written conventions of the English language. This course prepares students for the college level Advanced Placement program by emphasizing the higher level critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation and synthesis through a focus on literary analysis. REQUIRED SUMMER READING: Pre-AP and AP English classes will assess comprehension during the first three weeks of school through an objective exam and a written essay.
  • 30. 30 ENGLISH III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): English II The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English III, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis. AP ENGLISH III (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): English II, Required Summer Reading See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines. This course will emphasize a study of texts and writing tasks that will train students to become skilled readers of American prose written in a variety of periods. Students will also acquire some knowledge of the evolution of English prose style since the Puritan period in U.S. history. Accelerated vocabulary study is emphasized. This is a college level course with an AP/College Board approved curriculum. The Advanced Placement English Examination in language and composition is offered in May of each year. REQUIRED SUMMER READING: Pre-AP and AP English classes will assess comprehension during the first three weeks of school through an objective exam and a written essay. ENGLISH IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): English III The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English IV, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis. AP ENGLISH IV (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): English III, Required Summer Reading See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course engages the careful reading of literary works so as to sharpen awareness of language and understanding of the writer’s craft. Standards for the independent appreciation of literary works are developed, and these increase the sensitivity to literature as a shared experience. Style, subject, audience, effective use of language, and the organization of ideas are all parts of the writing instruction. This is a college level course with an AP/College Board approved curriculum. The Advanced Placement English Examination in literature and composition is offered in May of each year. REQUIRED SUMMER READING: Pre-AP and AP English classes will assess comprehension during the first three weeks of school through an objective exam and a written essay.
  • 31. 31 BUSINESS ENGLISH Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): English III, Touch Systems Data Entry, and Approved Minimum Graduation Plan Students recognize, evaluate, and prepare for a rapidly evolving global business environment that requires flexibility and adaptability. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts for business reproduction. CREATIVE WRITING Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None The study of creative writing allows high school students to earn one-half to one credit while developing versatility as a writer. Creative Writing, a rigorous composition course, asks high school students to demonstrate their skill in such forms of writing as fictional writing, short stories, poetry, and drama. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the recursive nature of the writing process, effectively applying the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. The students' evaluation of their own writing as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing this course are able to analyze and discuss published and unpublished pieces of writing, develop peer and self-assessments for effective writing, and set their own goals as writers. PRACTICAL WRITING I Credit: .5 - 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Suggested for all 10-12 students who did not pass the ELA writing portion of the STAAR/TAKS This course is designed for 10-12 students who did not pass the writing portion of the STAAR/TAKS test. The recursive nature of the writing process will be developed so that the skills of generating ideas for writing, revising and editing written drafts, and polishing writing for publication are clearly understood. ENGLISH (G, GM) I, II, III, IV (English Inclusion I-IV) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills English courses, these courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Students develop their writing skills by creating compositions through the use of the writing process. Students advance their reading abilities and acquire literary terminology through the study of literary genres. Students expand their vocabularies, learn Standard English grammar, and analyze the components and structure of well – formed sentences and paragraphs, with emphasis placed on the development of skills required for successful performance on standardized tests. ENGLISH I (M) (Basic English I) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) of the general education English I course, is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. It focuses on integrated language arts study in language, writing, oral and written conventions, reading, research, listening and speaking. English I M includes using strategies in critical thinking to increase language skills. ENGLISH II (M) (Basic English II) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of the general education English II course, is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Students will continue to increase and refine their communication skills; plan, draft and
  • 32. 32 complete written compositions with different aims and modes; and read extensively in multiple genres from world literature translated to English from various cultures. ENGLISH III (M) (Basic English III) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of the general education English III course, is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. The course focuses on integrated language arts study in language/writing, oral and written conventions, reading, research, listening and speaking. Students will present and critique oral communications and multimedia products ENGLISH IV (M) (Basic English IV) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course, based on the knowledge and skills of the general education English IV course, is modified in order to meet the needs of each student. The course focuses on integrated language arts study and involves the reading of a wide variety of British and other world literature. English IV M includes the continuing development of study skills, strategies and the use of critical thinking skills. ENGLISH (T); (Skills T) I, II, III, IV Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses will provide opportunities to participate in the English curriculum that has been adapted in scope, complexity, materials, methods of presentation and response styles appropriate to individual student needs. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). These courses meet the state graduation requirements for English ENGLISH (T); (Skills T ) V, VI, VII Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses assist students in developing skills in the areas of expressive, receptive, written, and/or symbolic representations of language. Attention is given to communicate effectively within the range of the student’s abilities (directly or through assistive devices). Communication is examined in regard to social appropriateness, environmental cues and prompts, understanding generalizations in real-life context, and the responsibilities of independent living skills that relate directly to employment. Students will explore job-related language. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP)responsibilities of independent living skills that relate directly to employment. Students will explore job-related language. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). ESOL I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): LPAC Placement. Composite score of Beginner or Intermediate on TELPAS or is in the first year of US schooling This course teaches all the TEKS for English I and ESOL while providing linguistically accommodated instruction to assist students in mastering the objectives. Emphasis is placed on developing the acquisition of English through listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course is designed for students at the beginner or intermediate proficiency levels. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English I.
  • 33. 33 ESOL II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): LPAC Placement. Composite score of Beginner or Intermediate on TELPAS or is in the first year of US schooling This course teaches all the TEKS for English II and ESOL while providing linguistically accommodated instruction to assist students in mastering the objectives. Emphasis is placed on developing the acquisition of English through language/writing, oral and written conventions, reading, research, listening and speaking. This course is designed for students at the beginning or intermediate proficiency levels. This course meets the state graduation requirement for English II. ENGLISH FOR NEWCOMERS Credit: 1-2 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): LPAC Placement. Composite score of Beginner or intermediate on TELPAS or is in the first year of US schooling This course teaches all the TEKS for English I and ESOL while providing linguistically accommodated instruction to assist students in mastering the objectives. Emphasis is placed on the initial acquisition of English through listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course is designed for new immigrants who have little or no English language proficiency. This course meets the state requirement for English I. READING COLLEGE READINESS and STUDY SKILLS Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None High school students that require or request additional honing of the study skills, especially as the students prepare for the demands of college, may enroll in the one semester course College Readiness and Study Skills. In this course, students acquire techniques for learning from texts, including studying word meanings, identifying and relating key ideas, drawing and supporting inferences, and reviewing study strategies. In all cases, interpretations and understandings will be presented through varying forms, including through use of available technology. Students accomplish many of the objectives through wide reading as well as use of content texts in preparation for post-secondary schooling. READING I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): Required for all students who did not pass the first administration of the 8th grade Reading STAAR or students without reading proficiency. Reading I, II, III offers students reading instruction to successfully navigate academic demands as well as attain life-long literacy skills. Specific instruction in word recognition, vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and fluency provides students an opportunity to read with competence, confidence, and understanding. Students learn how traditional and electronic texts are organized and how authors choose language for effect. All of these strategies are applied in instructional-level and independent-level texts that cross the content areas. READING II, III Credit: 1 - 3 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Previous level required for all students who did not pass the 8th -11th grade Reading/ELA STAAR/TAKS and/or for students without reading proficiency. Reading I, II, III offers students reading instruction to successfully navigate academic demands as well as attain life-long literacy skills. Specific instruction in word recognition, vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and fluency provides students an opportunity to read with competence, confidence, and understanding. Students learn how traditional and electronic texts are organized and how authors choose language for effect. All of these strategies are applied in instructional-level and independent-level texts that cross the content areas.
  • 34. 34 BASIC LANGUAGE SKILLS Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Placement by SAIL committee This course is a multi-sensory approach to learning basic language skills of reading, writing, and spelling for students who have been assessed by a GISD Reading specialist and placed in the “Basic Language Skills” program by a SAIL committee. The goal of this course is for the students to acquire the skills necessary to be on grade level in reading, writing, and spelling. READING I, II, III FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL READING) Credit: .5-3 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Identified as ELL /LEP student These courses offer students reading instruction to successfully navigate academic demands as well as attain life-long literacy skills. These courses build on the foundation of English I by developing further reading comprehension strategies that will prepare the learner for mastering the TAKS EXIT Level reading test. Vocabulary and writing skills are further enhanced by using the student’s background first language to access information and to further develop critical reading skills. Using a multi-sensory approach and a strong emphasis on visualization of new concepts, learners in this class will utilize these methods in all their subject areas. Educational technology may be utilized with computer-assisted instruction such as CEI and/or Rosetta Stone.
  • 35. 35 Mathematics Graduation Requirements MATHEMATICS ALGEBRA I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): None This course is the foundation concepts for high school mathematics. As presented in Grades K-8, the basic understandings of number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics are essential foundations for all work in high school mathematics. Students will continue to build on this foundation as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Symbolic reasoning plays a critical role in algebra; symbols provide powerful ways to represent mathematical situations and to express generalizations. Students use symbols in a variety of ways to study relationships among quantities. A function is a fundamental mathematical concept; it expresses a special kind of relationship between two quantities. Students use functions to determine one quantity from another, to represent and model problem situations, and to analyze and interpret relationships. Equations and inequalities arise as a way of asking and answering questions involving functional relationships. Students work in many situations to set up equations and inequalities and use a variety of methods to solve them. Techniques for working with functions and equations are essential in understanding underlying relationships. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to model mathematical situations to solve meaningful problems. Many processes underlie all content areas in mathematics. As they do mathematics, students continually use problem-solving, language and communication, and reasoning (justification and proof) to make connections within and outside mathematics. Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem- solving contexts. ALGEBRA I DOUBLE BLOCKED Credit: 2: (1 State Algebra I credit; 1 Local algebra Lab) Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): Failure of the first administration of the 8th grade Mathematics STAAR or placement on counselor recommendation This course is the foundation concepts for high school mathematics. As presented in Grades K-8, the basic understandings of number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics are essential foundations for all work in high school mathematics. Students will continue to build on this foundation as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Symbolic reasoning plays a critical role in algebra; symbols provide powerful ways to represent mathematical situations and to express generalizations. Students use symbols in a variety of ways to study relationships among quantities. A function is a fundamental mathematical concept; it expresses a special kind of relationship between two quantities. Students use functions to determine one quantity from another, to represent and model problem situations, and to analyze and interpret relationships. Equations and inequalities arise as a way of asking and answering questions involving functional relationships. Students work in many situations to set up equations and inequalities and use a variety of methods to solve them. Techniques for working with functions and equations are essential in understanding underlying relationships. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to model mathematical situations to solve meaningful problems. Many processes underlie all content areas in mathematics. As they do mathematics, students continually use problem-solving, language and communication, and reasoning (justification and proof) to make connections within and outside mathematics. Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem- solving contexts. PRE-AP ALGEBRA I (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a rigorous and fast-paced course designed to prepare students for the challenges of the Advanced Placement program. This course covers the regular Algebra I curriculum in greater depth. Non-graphing scientific calculator recommended for home use.
  • 36. 36 GEOMETRY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra 1 As presented in Grades K-8, the basic understandings of number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics are essential foundations for all work in high school mathematics. Students continue to build on this foundation as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Spatial reasoning plays a critical role in geometry; geometric figures provide powerful ways to represent mathematical situations and to express generalizations about space and spatial relationships. Students use geometric thinking to understand mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. Geometry consists of the study of geometric figures of zero, one, two, and three dimensions and the relationships among them. Students study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction, and orientation of these figures. Geometry can be used to model and represent many mathematical and real-world situations. Students perceive the connection between geometry and the real and mathematical worlds and use geometric ideas, relationships, and properties to solve problems. Techniques for working with spatial figures and their properties are essential in understanding underlying relationships. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to solve meaningful problems by representing and transforming figures and analyzing relationships. Many processes underlie all content areas in mathematics. As they do mathematics, students continually use problem-solving, language and communication, connections within and outside mathematics, and reasoning (justification and proof). Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem solving contexts. PRE-AP GEOMETRY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I or PAP Algebra I, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a rigorous and fast-paced course designed to prepare students for the challenges of the Advanced Placement program. This course covers the regular Geometry curriculum in greater depth. Proficiency in Algebra I is essential. Non-graphing scientific calculator recommended for home use. MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I - Required for students who do not pass the Math portion of the 10th grade TAKS test In Mathematical Models with Applications, students continue to build on the K-8 and Algebra I foundations as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Students use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, to model information, and to solve problems from various disciplines. Students use mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design, and science. Students use mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics and connections among these to solve problems from a wide variety of advanced applications in both mathematical and nonmathematical situations. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to link modeling techniques and purely mathematical concepts and to solve applied problems. As students do mathematics, they continually use problem-solving, language and communication, connections within and outside mathematics, and reasoning (justification and proof). Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem-solving contexts. ALGEBRA II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I As presented in Grades K-8, the basic understandings of number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics are essential foundations for all work in high school mathematics. Students continue to build on this foundation as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Symbolic reasoning plays a critical role in algebra; symbols provide powerful ways to represent mathematical situations and to express generalizations. Students study algebraic concepts and the relationships among them to better understand the structure of algebra. The study of functions, equations, and their relationship is central to all of mathematics. Students perceive functions and equations as means for analyzing and understanding a broad variety of relationships and as a useful tool for expressing generalizations. Equations and functions are algebraic tools that can be used to represent geometric curves and figures; similarly,
  • 37. 37 geometric figures can illustrate algebraic relationships. Students perceive the connections between algebra and geometry and use the tools of one to help solve problems in the other. Techniques for working with functions and equations are essential in understanding underlying relationships. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to model mathematical situations to solve meaningful problems. Many processes underlie all content areas in mathematics. As they do mathematics, students continually use problem-solving, language and communication, and reasoning (justification and proof) to make connections within and outside mathematics. Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem-solving contexts. ALGEBRA II DOUBLE BLOCK Credit: 1 State credit; 1 local credit (lab) Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I, required for students who have not passed the math portion of the STAAR test This course is an extension of Algebra I. Areas of study include concepts and skills associated with the complex number system, rational expressions, solving systems of quadratic equations, the properties of relations and functions, matrices and determinants, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions and higher degree polynomials. Students will use a combined knowledge of Algebra and Geometry to model and solve problems. The class will allow for slower pacing of the Algebra II concepts and allow time for STAAR preparation. Students who are placed in this class or choose to take this class will attend class daily, receiving one math credit and one local credit. PRE-AP ALGEBRA II (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I or PAP Algebra I, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a rigorous and fast-paced course designed to prepare students for the challenges of the Advanced Placement program. This course covers the regular Algebra II curriculum with greater depth and complexity. Areas of study include concepts and skills associated with the complex number system, rational expressions, solving systems of quadratic equations, the properties of relations and functions, matrices and determinants, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions and higher degree polynomials. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE REASONING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry In Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, students continue to build upon the K-8, Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry foundations as they expand their understanding through further mathematical experiences. Advanced Quantitative Reasoning includes the analysis of information using statistical methods and probability, modeling change and mathematical relationships, and spatial and geometric modeling for mathematical reasoning. Students learn to become critical consumers of real-world quantitative data, knowledgeable problem solvers who use logical reasoning and mathematical thinkers who can use their quantitative skills to solve authentic problems. Students develop critical skills for success in college and careers, including investigation, research, collaboration, and both written and oral communication of their work, as they solve problems in many types of applied situations. As students work with these mathematical topics, they continually rely on mathematical processes, including problem-solving techniques, appropriate mathematical language and communication skills, connections within and outside mathematics, and reasoning. Students also use multiple representations, technology, applications and modeling, and numerical fluency in problem-solving contexts. PRECALCULUS Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra II and Geometry In Precalculus, students continue to build on the K-8, Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry foundations as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Students use symbolic reasoning and analytical methods to represent mathematical situations, to express generalizations, and to study mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. Students use functions, equations, and limits as useful tools for expressing generalizations and as means for analyzing and understanding a broad variety of mathematical relationships. Students also use functions as well as symbolic reasoning to represent and connect ideas in geometry, probability, statistics, trigonometry, and calculus and to model physical situations. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal), tools, and technology (including, but not limited to, calculators with graphing capabilities, data collection devices, and computers) to model functions and equations and solve real-life problems.
  • 38. 38 PRE-AP PRECALCULUS (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a rigorous and fast-paced course designed to prepare students for the challenges of the Advanced Placement program. This course covers the regular Precalculus curriculum with greater depth and complexity. This course is designed to prepare the student for AP Calculus. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS: ESSENTIAL STATISTICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Completed Algebra II This is an introductory course in statistics to extend students’ mathematical understanding beyond the Algebra II level. This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include descriptive statistics, surveys and sampling, and inference testing. AP CALCULUS AB (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Precalculus, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a full-year course designed to cover one semester of college level calculus. Content includes limits, derivatives, integration and applications to special functions and other topics covered by the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Test. The intent of this course is to prepare those interested in taking the AP Calculus AB exam. AP CALCULUS BC (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Precalculus, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a full-year course designed to cover two semesters of college level calculus. In addition to the topics covered by Calculus AB, it will include parametric functions, vector functions, slope fields, Euler’s method, L’Hopital’s Rule, polynomial approximations and series. The intent of this course is to prepare those interested in taking the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Test. Calculus BC is fast-paced. There will be limited class time for reinforcement and it is recommended only for those identified by the precalculus teachers. AP STATISTICS (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra II, Geometry, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a college level first course in probabilities and statistics designed to teach the student the fundamentals of determining and interpreting probabilities and statistics. Topics include methods of counting, computing probabilities, probability distributions, frequency distributions, sampling, data gathering, various methods of statistical analysis, z-scores, hypothesis testing, experiment design, and regression models. The intent of this course is to prepare those interested in taking the AP Statistics exam. AP COMPUTER SCIENCE II (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Computer Science I and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science is designed to prepare students for the AP Computer Science A exam. The programming language used in this course is Java. Topics covered in this course include object-oriented programming, algorithmic analysis, and advanced data structures. Students will develop programs individually and in teams. Note: This course satisfies the requirement for a fourth credit of Mathematics for students graduating on the Recommended Plan who have already completed Algebra I, II, and Geometry.
  • 39. 39 ALGEBRA 1 G, GM (Algebra I Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): None This course is the foundation of high school math, providing a transition from arithmetic to higher math. It is the study of the interrelationship between variables and the methods for manipulating them. Topics of study include foundations for functions, linear functions, and quadratic and non-linear functions. Students will use tools, technology and a variety of representations to model and solve problems. ALGEBRA I G, GM DOUBLE BLOCKED (Algebra I Inclusion Double Block) Credit: 1 State; 1 Local Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Mathematics courses, Algebra I courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Algebra 1 is the foundation of high school math providing a transition from arithmetic to higher math Topics of study include foundations for functions, linear functions and quadratic and non-linear functions. Students will use tools, technology, and a variety of representations to model and solve problems. Students will meet for this class every day. GEOMETRY G, GM (Geometry Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills Mathematics courses, Geometry courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Geometry consists of the study of geometric figures of zero, one, two and three dimensions. Students study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction and orientation of these figures. The connection between algebra and geometry is made and the tools of both courses will be used to solve application problems. MATH MODELS G, GM (Math Models Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement 10-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills Mathematics courses, Math Models courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Mathematical Models with Applications may serve as a bridge between the sequence of Algebra I/Geometry and Algebra II. In Mathematical Models with Applications, students build on the K-8 and Algebra I foundations. Students will use mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics and connections among these to solve applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design and science. Class will also incorporate additional TAKS/STAAR remediation. ALGEBRA II (G, GM) DOUBLE BLOCK (ALGEBRA II INCLUSION DOUBLE BLOCK) Credit: 1 State; 1 Local Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills Mathematics courses, Algebra II Double Block courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Areas of study include concepts and skills associated with the complex number system, rational expressions, solving systems of quadratic equations, the properties of relations and functions, matrices and determinants, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, and higher degree polynomials. Students will use a combined knowledge of Algebra and Geometry to model and solve problems. ALGEBRA 1 (M) (Basic Math I) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses provide a concrete foundation in basic algebraic concepts by reinforcing operations in the real number system. Students learn algebraic and symbolic reasoning to study relationships among quantities, define relationships between functions and equations, and to set up and solve problems. The language of mathematics is translated into basic equations and operations. Students will be
  • 40. 40 introduced to basic linear functions, quadratic, and other non-linear functions through use of concrete models, graphs, and tables. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan. GEOMETRY (M) (Basic Math II) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra 1, ARD Committee Placement This course consists of the study of geometric figures of zero, one, two, and three dimensions. Students study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction, and orientation of these figures. Compass and straight edge constructions are used to explore attributes of geometric figures and make conjectures about geometric relationships. The scope of this course and TEKS are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). MATH MODELS (M) (Basic Math III) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra 1, ARD Committee Placement In Mathematical Models students build on the K-8 and Algebra I foundations. Students will use mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics and connections among these to solve applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design and science. Class will also incorporate additional TAKS/STAAR remediation. The scope of this course and TEKS are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). ALGEBRA 1(T, Skills T); Geometry (T, Skills T); Math Modeling (T, Skills T) Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 9-11 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses will provide opportunities to participate in instructional activities linked to the Math curriculum that has been adapted in scope, complexity, materials, methods of presentation and response styles appropriate to individual student needs. Students will receive instruction in the TEKS curriculum through prerequisite skills linked to the grade-level student expectations. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). These courses meet the state graduation requirements for Math. MATH (T, Skills T) IV, V, VI, VII Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 12, 12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Approval Only These courses are designed to reinforce math operations using a variety of practical, real-life situations in mathematics in daily living exercises. Emphasis is on applying math in the use of money, personal financial situations and solving home and work problems. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP).
  • 41. 41 Science Graduation Requirements SCIENCES BIOLOGY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-11 Prerequisite(s): None In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues, and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment. PRE-AP BIOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-11 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is highly recommended as a prerequisite for those students who plan on taking AP Biology and the AP exam as Juniors or Seniors. It includes a more in-depth study of certain selected topics to prepare students for AP Biology. It differs from the core Biology course in that the topics covered will explore topics with greater depth and complexity. Laboratory work will be used to promote student inquiry and independent thought. Additional time, effort and higher level thinking skills are required. There is additional supplemental reading as well as textbook reading required for this course. Laboratory work, including dissections, collections, and student-designed experiments is required. AP BIOLOGY, AP BIOLOGY LAB (Weighted) Credit: 1 State (course) + .5 Local (lab) Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology, Chemistry, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course. Using a college textbook, students will explore a wider range of topics at a greater depth than the students in Biology. The laboratory section of the class requires the completion of 12 complex labs that explore the topics covered in the lecture portion. The course is organized according to College Board standards and upon completion; students will take the AP Biology exam. Emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Major areas of study will be molecular biology, cells, evolution, heredity, organisms and populations. Due to the challenging nature and amount of information covered in this course, the class meets daily. Students will attend a regularly scheduled class. Students will attend a separate lab class to be taken either in the fall or spring semester. A pass-fail grade will be awarded for local labs. Each student must purchase a lab notebook in order to document the lab experience. INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY (IPC) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): Student must not currently have credit for either chemistry or physics. This course enables students to conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical-thinking and scientific problem-solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: motion, waves, energy transformations, properties of matter, changes in matter and solution chemistry. CHEMISTRY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): One unit of high school science and Algebra I In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of the Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.
  • 42. 42 PRE-AP CHEMISTRY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Presently enrolled or credit in Algebra II See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines. This course is highly recommended as a prerequisite for those students who plan on taking Advanced Placement Chemistry and the AP exam as Juniors or Seniors. It includes a more in-depth study of certain selected topics to prepare students for Advanced Placement Chemistry. Examples of topics that are more in-depth include quantum mechanics, predicting products, limiting reagents and reaction mechanisms. Students will be expected to have fundamental knowledge in science that includes scientific method, scientific notation, differences in physical and chemical properties and classification of matter. This course requires a strong mathematical background. AP CHEMISTRY, AP CHEMISTRY LAB (Weighted) Credit: 1 State (course) + .5 Local (lab) Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra II, Chemistry This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course. Topics covered will include those topics regularly covered in a chemistry course for science majors. The course will differ from the usual high school science course with the level of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the types of labs. Laboratory work will be highly emphasized and students will be required to keep a thoroughly detailed lab notebook. Laboratory work also involves the analysis of unknown mixtures by qualitative analysis. Due to the challenging nature and amount of information covered in this course, the class meets daily. Students will attend a regularly scheduled class. Students will attend a separate lab class to be taken either in the fall or spring semester. A pass-fail grade will be awarded for local lab. Upon completion students will be offered the opportunity to take the AP Chemistry exam. Graphing calculator (TI 83+) extremely useful. PHYSICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): One unit of high school science, Algebra I, and completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II In Physics, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Students who successfully complete Physics will acquire factual knowledge within a conceptual framework, practice experimental design and interpretation, work collaboratively with colleagues, and develop critical thinking skills. PRE-AP PHYSICS (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Algebra II, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines Pre-AP Physics is highly recommended as a prerequisite for those students who plan on taking Advanced Placement Physics B or C and AP Physics exam(s) as seniors. It includes all aspects of Physics. Topics include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; force; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and quantum physics. It also includes a more in-depth study of certain selected topics to prepare students for Advanced Placement Physics B or C. Students will be expected to have fundamental knowledge in science that includes scientific method, scientific notation and integration of mathematics in science. This course requires a strong mathematical background. AP PHYSICS B (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus and credit in Physics, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course includes the study of Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required for the course. The basic ideas of calculus may be introduced in connection with physical concepts, such as acceleration and work. Understanding of the basic principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems are major goals of the course. The course is intended for students who want to study physics as a basis for more advanced work in the life sciences, medicine, geology and related areas, or as a
  • 43. 43 component in a non-science college program that has a science requirement. Upon completion, students will be offered the opportunity to take the AP Physics B exam. AP PHYSICS C (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in Calculus and earned credit in Physics, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a college level Calculus-based physics course that includes two major areas of study. The first semester is devoted to mechanics. Use of Calculus in problem solving and derivations is expected to increase as the course progresses. In the second semester, the primary emphasis is on classical electricity and magnetism. Calculus is used freely in formulating principles and in solving problems. This is a very challenging course covering a breadth of information requiring strong mathematical skills. Emphasis is on content, critical thinking, as well as problem solving techniques. The course is intended for students who intend to study engineering or the physical sciences in college. Upon completion, students will be offered the opportunity to take the AP Physics C: Mechanics and the AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism exams. EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry; Chemistry may be concurrent ESS is a capstone course designed to build on students' prior scientific and academic knowledge and skills to develop understanding of Earth's system in space and time. AQUATIC SCIENCE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology, Chemistry and IPC or Physics In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize fresh water or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school. Students who successfully complete Aquatic Science will acquire knowledge about a variety of aquatic systems, conduct investigations and observations of aquatic environments, work collaboratively with peers, and develop critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology, Chemistry and IPC or Physics Environmental Systems is intended as both a STAAR/TAKS Science review and to provide additional science course options for those who may require an additional science credit. Students in this course will be required to thoroughly study the entire Chemistry core curriculum and prepare for the Science portion of the STAAR/TAKS test. In Environmental Systems, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats; ecosystems and biomes; interrelationships among resources and an environmental system; sources and flow of energy though an environmental system; relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems; and changes in environments. AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry AP Environmental Science is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course. Using a college textbook, the goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary and embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. These areas include environmental problems, matter and energy, ecosystems, biodiversity, populations, water resources and pollution, air pollution, climate geology, and waste. Basic knowledge of biology, chemistry and basic algebra are required. AP Environmental Science offers students an excellent chance to prepare for the national AP exam and earn college credit.
  • 44. 44 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science Students in Medical Microbiology explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases. Note: Students must also complete Pathophysiology – a successful completion of both of these courses will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirements under both the Recommended and Distinguished High School Plans. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science In Pathophysiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology. Note: Students must also complete Medical Microbiology – a successful completion of both of these courses will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirements under both the Recommended and Distinguished High School Plans. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science In Anatomy and Physiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis. ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry Students enrolled in this course will apply advanced academic knowledge and skills to the emerging fields of biotechnology such as agricultural, medical, regulatory, and forensics and also have the opportunity to use sophisticated laboratory equipment, perform statistical analysis, and practice quality-control techniques. Students will conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Advanced Biotechnology study a variety of topics that include structures and functions of cells, nucleic acids, proteins, and genetics. Scientific inquiry, science and social ethics and scientific systems will also be covered. Successful completion of this course will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirements under both the Recommended and Distinguished High School plans. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. FORENSIC SCIENCE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Law, Public Safety Corrections, and Security; and Law Enforcement I Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science. To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b)(2)(C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).
  • 45. 45 ADVANCED ANIMAL SCIENCE: 1 Credit; Grade Placement: 12 (See p. 77 for more information.) INTEGRATED PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY (IPC) (G, GM) (IPC Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): Student must not currently have credit for either chemistry or physics, ARD Committee Placement Based on the TEKS of the Integrated Physics and Chemistry course, IPC courses are designed to meet the individual learning needs of students. Integrated Physics and Chemistry students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical-thinking and scientific problem–solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: motion, waves, energy transformations, properties of matter, changes in matter, and solution chemistry. BIOLOGY (G, GM) (Biology Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Science courses, Biology courses are modified to meet the individual needs of students within this general education environment. Biology students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical-thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues, and organs; taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; ecosystems; and plants and the environment. CHEMISTRY (G, GM), (Chemistry Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): One Unit of H.S. Science and Algebra I, ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Science Courses, Chemistry courses are designed to meet the individual needs of students. In this course, students conduct field and laboratory investigations and make informed decision using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: characteristics of matter, energy transformations during physical and chemical changes, atomic structure, periodic table of elements, behavior of gases, bonding, nuclear fusion and nuclear fission, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical equations, solutes, properties of solutions, acids and bases, and chemical reactions. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives. Mathematics is highly integrated into this course. Time spent in the laboratory utilizes a lab notebook, which documents the lab experience and is integral part of the course and the grade. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (G, GM), (Environmental Systems Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology, IPC or Chemistry, ARD Committee Placement In Environmental Systems, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats, ecosystems and biomes, interrelationships among resources and an environmental system, sources and flow of energy through an environmental system, relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems, and changes in environments. PHYSICS (G, GM), (Physics Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): One Unit of H.S. Science and Algebra I, ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Science Courses, the Physics course is designed to meet the individual needs of students. In this course, students conduct field and laboratory investigations and make informed decision using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion, changes within physical systems and of waves, and quantum physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. A strong math background is a MUST for successful completion.
  • 46. 46 INTEGRATED PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY (IPC) (M) (Basic IPC) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): Student must not currently have credit for either chemistry or physics, ARD Committee Placement Based on the TEKS of the Integrated Physics and Chemistry course, IPC courses are modified to meet the individual learning needs of students. Integrated Physics and Chemistry students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical-thinking and scientific problem–solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: motion, waves, energy transformations, properties of matter, changes in matter, and solution chemistry. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). BIOLOGY (M) (Basic Biology) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This Biology course is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) of the general education Biology course is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. This activity based course covers cell structure and function of systems in organisms, scientific processes and basic concepts of biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, taxonomy, botany, physiology and zoology. Emphasis is on the understanding of biology as seen in current science events and real-world application. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). IPC (T, Skills T); BIOLOGY (T, Skills T) Credit: 1-2 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses will provide opportunities to participate in instructional activities linked to the Science curriculum that has been adapted in scope, complexity, materials, methods of presentation and response styles appropriate to individual student needs. Students will receive instruction in the TEKS curriculum through prerequisite skills linked to the grade-level student expectations. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). These courses meet the state graduation requirements for Science. SCIENCE (T) III, IV, V Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 11-12, 12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These Science courses study science-based concepts related specifically to independent daily living and employment. Attention is given to relating science to home and job practices. Activities will foster student understanding of their roles and responsibilities in adult life. Experiences are “hands-on” with an emphasis on cooperative learning strategies. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP).
  • 47. 47 SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD GEOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-10 Prerequisite(s): None In World Geography Studies, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. Students describe the influence of geography on events of the past and present with emphasis on contemporary issues. A significant portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems and their interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of the world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region. Students analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems. Students identify the processes that influence political divisions of the planet and analyze how different points of view affect the development of public policies. Students compare how components of culture shape the characteristics of regions and analyze the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. Students use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions. PRE-AP WORLD GEOGRAPHY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is intended to prepare the student for the college level AP social studies courses in high school and will address topics covering all of the on-level World Geography class. It will delve into greater depth and complexity on issues such as environmental studies, economic development, comparison of governmental systems, demographics, and international politics. A spring semester novel will also be required (to be announced). REQUIRED SUMMER READING: Outside reading is required and will be announced to students. WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None World History Studies is a survey of the history of humankind. Due to the expanse of world history and the time limitations of the school year, the scope of this course should focus on "essential" concepts and skills that can be applied to various eras, events, and people within the standards in subsection (c) of this section. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world. Students evaluate the causes and effects of political and economic imperialism and of major political revolutions since the 17th century. Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and identify the historic origins of contemporary economic systems. Students analyze the process by which constitutional governments evolved as well as the ideas from historic documents that influenced that process. Students trace the historical development of important legal and political concepts. Students examine the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions. Students analyze the connections between major developments in science and technology and the growth of industrial economies, and they use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence. AP WORLD HISTORY STUDIES (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): PAP World Geography Recommended, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a college level course that will develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course offers a truly balanced global coverage of Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Students practice writing analytical essays and research papers, analyzing and interpreting primary sources, and analyzing statistical data. Advanced Placement History offers students an excellent chance to prepare for the national Advanced Placement Exam and earn college credit. Reading requirements include text written on the college level, as well as research of historical journal articles.
  • 48. 48 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES – SOCIAL ISSUES Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students will learn how to make a difference in their school and community and create a safe inclusive environment at school. Students will participate in a variety of service learning experiences as they work to combat bullying and harassment. Activities will include the No Place for Hate program, Challenge Day curriculum, and Aisle One Campus Food Bank. UNITED STATES HISTORY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): None This course is taught as a survey of U.S. history since the Civil War. It begins with a review of U.S. History through the Civil War. It then encompasses an in-depth study of major movements and events in U.S. history from 1877 to present, including geographic influences, political, economic, social, and cultural developments, and the emergence of the U.S. as a world power. Evaluation will be objective exams and limited critical essay work. This course is designed to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past and to focus on historical change over time. AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a college level course. It involves a comprehensive study of American history from 1600 to present. Emphasis will be on the development of analytical skills. Extensive outside reading, independent study, and critical writing will be required. Reading material will be the college level text and selected essays. Students will be expected to write extensively in essay form, arriving at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and presenting reasons and evidence in a clear and persuasive manner. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Co-Teacher Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): U.S. History In United States Government, the focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. This course is the culmination of the civic and governmental content and concepts studied from Kindergarten through required secondary courses. Students learn major political ideas and forms of government in history. A significant focus of the course is on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems. Students identify the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system and examine the strategic importance of places to the United States. Students analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media on the American political system, evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a constitutional republic, and analyze the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. Students examine the relationship between governmental policies and the culture of the United States. Students identify examples of government policies that encourage scientific research and use critical-thinking skills to create a product on a contemporary government issue. AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (Weighted) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): U.S. History, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines The AP United States Government and Politics course is designed to examine the institutions, participants and processes which characterize political activity in the United States. The course has three objectives: 1) To introduce students to the “nuts and bolts” of American national government; 2) To help students develop an analytical perspective toward the conduct of politics in the United States; and 3) To introduce students to the manner in which political scientists conduct research on the political process. It is strongly recommended that a student has been successful in a least one Pre-AP or AP social studies class before undertaking this class.
  • 49. 49 ECONOMICS Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): U.S. History The course will be a basic study of economics to include the origin of capitalism, socialism, and communism. Students will discuss causes and possible solutions to current economic problems such as inflation, unemployment, and recession. Students will study the banking system and the role of banks in the nation’s economy. Extensive instruction in personal financial literacy is included. AP MACROECONOMICS (Weighted) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): U.S. History, classified grade 12, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a college level course that fulfills the requirements for senior level economics. The course includes a survey of economic theory, and compares the free enterprise system to other models. Basic microeconomic concepts are examined, including markets, supply and demand, labor, and the firm. Special emphasis will be given to macro issues, including fiscal and monetary policy, measures of production and income. The course is designed to prepare the student to pass the Advanced Placement Exam and receive college credit. Therefore, the student will be challenged with college level material, and rigorous outside readings and research. It is strongly recommended that a student have been successful in a least one Pre-AP or AP social studies class before undertaking this class. AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines Advanced Placement European History is a college level course. It is a comprehensive study in European history from 1450-1995. Emphasis will be on developing an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, developing an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to express that understanding and analysis in writing. Reading material will be a college level text and selected essays and documents. It is strongly recommended that a student have been successful in a least one Pre-AP or AP social studies class before undertaking this class. PSYCHOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11 or 12 Prerequisite(s): None In Psychology, an elective course, students study the science of behavior and mental processes. Students examine the full scope of the science of psychology such as the historical framework, methodologies, human development, motivation, emotion, sensation, perception, personality development, cognition, learning, intelligence, biological foundations, mental health, and social psychology AP PSYCHOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course traces the emergence of scientific psychology in the nineteenth century from its roots in philosophy and physiology. It covers the development of the major “schools” of psychology, showing how these schools differed in what they viewed as the proper subject matter of psychology and the methods used to study it. This historical introduction helps students gain an understanding of the principal approaches to psychology: behavioral, biological, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, evolutionary/sociobiological and sociocultural. Students learn how these approaches differentially guide research and practice. Students will be offered the opportunity to take the AP test at the end of the semester for college credit. SOCIOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None Sociology, an elective course, is an introductory study in social behavior and organization of human society. This course will describe the development of the field as a social science by identifying methods and strategies of research leading to an understanding of how
  • 50. 50 the individual relates to society and the ever changing world. Students will also learn the importance and role of culture, social structure, socialization, and social change in today's society. HUMANITIES Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): World History This course is an interdisciplinary course in which students will recognize writing as an art form. This course studies the major historical and cultural movements and their relationship to literature and other fine art. The students will interpret and analyze art forms, literature and political, social and philosophical movements. WORLD GEOGRAPHY (G, GM) (World Geography Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills social studies courses, World Geography courses are modified to meet the individual learning needs of students within the general education environment. This course encompasses the general study of the physical geography of the world and the elements that affect the physical setting and environment. WORLD HISTORY (G, GM) (World History Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills social studies, world history courses are modified to meet the individual needs of students within this general education environment. This course emphasizes the foundation of world civilizations and gives the student an understanding of our modern world based on historical study. UNITED STATES HISTORY (G, GM) (United States History Inclusion) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Social Studies, United States History courses are modified to meet the individual needs of students within this general education environment. This encompasses an in-depth study of major movements and events in U.S. History from 1877 to present, including geographic influences, political, economic, social and cultural developments, and the emergence of the U.S. as a world power. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (G, GM) (United States Government Inclusion) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement United States Government is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills Social Studies courses and is modified to meet the individual needs of students within the general education environment. This course focuses on American government, covering the United States and the Texas constitution. ECONOMICS (G, GM) (Economics Inclusion) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Economics is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and are modified to meet the individual needs of students within the general education environment. This course will be a basic study of economics to include the origin of capitalism, socialism and communism. Students will discuss causes of possible solutions to current economic problems such as inflation, unemployment, and recession. Students will study the banking system and the role of banks in the nation’s economy. Extensive instruction in personal financial literacy is included. WORLD GEOGRAPHY (M) (Basic World Geography) Credit: 1
  • 51. 51 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement World Geography is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of the general education World Geography course and is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. World Geography is the study of the interaction of people and cultures with their physical environment in the world’s major areas over time. Particular attention is given to the locations of natural resources, geographic boundaries, landforms, economic development, language, patterns of settlement, and the interaction of cultures and nations within the context of global development. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). WORLD HISTORY (M) (Basic World History) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement World History, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) of the general education World History course, is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. World History utilizes cause and effect strategies to focus on the historic development of human society from past to present times. Emphasis is placed on major events, world leaders, economic and political institutions, technological innovations, and the philosophical and religious beliefs that have shaped the modern world. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan(IEP). UNITED STATES HISTORY (M) (Basic United States History) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement United States History, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) of the general education United States History course, is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. This course focuses on U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present. Students analyze and evaluate major themes and events in U.S. history, leaders, economic and political institutions, technological innovations, and the philosophies that affect the United States today. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (M) (Basic United States Government) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement United States Government is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. The course examines the structure and function of the political and governmental systems of the United States and the citizens’ roles and responsibilities in each. Students understand, analyze, and evaluate the roles and responsibilities including voting, obeying laws and rules. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). ECONOMICS (M) (Basic Economics) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Economics is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of the general education Economics course and is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. The course investigates the structure and function of the United States economic/free enterprise system as it relates to consumers and world economics. Students will understand, analyze, explain the monetary system, free enterprise roles and responsibilities, types and roles of financial and business institutions, international relationships, taxation procedures and processes, and consumer responsibilities. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP).
  • 52. 52 WORLD GEOGRAPHY (T, Skills T); World History (T, Skills T); U.S. History (T, Skills T); U.S. Government (T, Skills T); Economics (T, Skills T) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses will provide opportunities to participate in instructional activities linked to the Social Studies curriculum that has been adapted in scope, complexity, materials, methods of presentation and response styles appropriate to individual student needs. Students will receive instruction in the TEKS curriculum through prerequisite skills linked to the grade-level student expectations. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). These courses meet the state graduation requirements for Social Studies. OCCUPATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS OCCUPATIONAL INVESTIGATION (M) Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course is designed to be taken with VOC Experience. The class facilitates the individualized entry-level employment to prepare the student for the world of work. These courses places emphasis on: career information/ transition, work habits, employer expectations, employment information, job-seeking skills, work simulations, the completion of work-related forms and the study of specific companies. This course will enable students to learn about work-related behavior, such as attendance, punctuality, and cooperation with co-workers. They also help students to develop the basic skills and attitudes, such as work-related vocabulary, manual dexterity, and gross and fine motor skills, they will need for success in life. The student’s Individual Education Plan will determine the exact TEKS to be mastered. VOCATIONAL EXPERIENCE (M) Credit: 1-8 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Currently employed, Instructor approval and ARD Committee Placement This course is an entry-level employment program. The program offers a supervised work-study experience with a focus on good work habits and sustained employment. Students are required to maintain a minimum number of work hours per week and to comply with instructor and supervisor requirements. This course enables students to experience a comprehensive and dynamic vocational atmosphere which prepares each student to capably handle present and future work assignment. The student’s Individual Education Plan will determine the exact TEKS to be mastered. OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION (T) Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Students will learn pre-employment and employment skills including career awareness, work behavior, job procurement and maintenance as well as job-specific skills. This course will enable students to learn what their needs, skills, and interests are and how these relate to the work force. They learn about worker classifications, self-awareness, career types, job maintenance skills, occupations, and employment trends. The student’s Individual Education Plan will determine the exact TEKS to be mastered COMMUNITY BASED VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTION, CBVI (T) Credit: 1-8 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement Students will learn employment skills within a variety of community vocational settings. demonstrate work ethic by observing workplace rules, exhibit social skills/behaviors appropriate for the work environment, and performing assigned duties as directed by the employer. Students are expected to dress accordance to the rules set by the employers work site. A job coach will provide direct support and supervision. The student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP) will determine the TEKS to be mastered.
  • 53. 53 BRIDGES (T) Credit: N/A Grade Placement: 12+ Prerequisite(s): Completion of Graduation Requirements, ARD Committee Placement This specially designed program is based on independence and preparation of young adults for life after high school by providing vocational transition skills training. BRIDGES currently has two tiers of operation. These young adults are able to access the BRIDGES program until their IEP goals and objectives are met, and/or they age out. ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES TEEN LEADERSHIP Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): None Teen Leadership is a semester course that teaches key concepts and skills essential for attaining maximum success. Students learn how to achieve personal goals, and develop a positive attitude and self-concept, along with peer pressure resistance and positive work ethic. Effective communication skills needed in professional and personal settings are taught and practiced throughout the course. Students learn social skills that are necessary to develop healthy personal and professional relationships and friendships which incorporate support and trust. Teen Leadership students will understand the value of integrity, the need for positive leadership, and will learn how to be pro-active leaders. PEER TUTORING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Credit: .5 State + .5 local (.5-1 total) Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Application Process The Peer Buddy Program is a one-semester course designed to allow selected students to serve as tutors and advocates for students with disabilities. Peer Buddies will receive training on how to instruct peers with special challenges in various activities. Tutors will be required to keep a daily log, which summarizes their daily work with students. Tutors will be required to complete readings and short reports designed to increase awareness of the nature and problems associated with various disabling conditions. As advocates, tutors will be expected to set the example for others that people with disabilities need the same consideration and respect as their non- disabled peers. Periodic meetings, before and/or after school, will be necessary to facilitate the success of the Peer Buddy program. A semester long commitment from all parties will provide a productive and enriching experience for all involved. The experience and growth will not only be valuable for a semester long term, but for a lifetime. PEER ASSISTANCE AND LEADERSHIP I & II Credit: 1-2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): A formal application to the program; recommendation of applicants from school personnel; a structured interview Peer Assistance and Leadership is a course in which selected high school students will be trained to work as peer facilitators with students of all ages, and/or from feeder middle and elementary schools. Participants will be trained in a variety of helping skills, which will enable them to assist other students in having a more positive and productive school experience. Elements of the course include: providing practical knowledge and skills, as well as actual field experience, for students potentially interested in careers in education or other helping professions; utilizing positive peer influence as a central strategy for addressing dropouts, substance abuse prevention, teen pregnancy and suicide, absenteeism, and other areas of concern in our district; and students are required to do a 10 hour outside of the classroom community service project. They are also required to purchase a t-shirt and supplies for class. SAT/ACT PREPARATION Credit: .5 local Grades: 12 - Fall, 11 - Spring Prerequisite(s): None This course gives you the opportunity to brush up on your study skills and learn great tools to help you prepare for the SAT and ACT. This class will mainly focus on the verbal/written portion of the SAT exam. It is a fast-paced class with 4-5 reading assignments and weekly SAT vocabulary quizzes/tests. Students are responsible for purchasing the SAT reading material.
  • 54. 54 OFFICE/LIBRARY AIDE Credit: .5-1 local Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Principal Approval This course allows students to provide clerical assistance in the school office or library. Basic clerical duties will be performed The duties as an aide are specified in writing and agreed upon in contract by the student, office personnel or librarian, and the principal. DAILY LIVING SKILLS I – VII (Skills T) Credit: 1-7 Grade Placement: 9-12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses assist students with the development of skills and behaviors appropriate for independent living. Activities and training are provided in the areas of food preparation, home care, personal care, money management and the use of community resources. The scope of these courses is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). COMMUNITY SKILLS I-VIII (Skills T) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement These courses introduce students to the interactive relationship between the student and the community through public service, voluntary organizations, and a variety of community activities. The ability to communicate and access community businesses, services, and resources including emergency services is developed through practical experiences and the development of individual interpersonal communication skills. Community-based instruction focuses on transportation, directionality, local landmarks, and other information related to accessing the community. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living. Includes: I-II Introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities; III-IV Project-based instruction/learning; V-VI “Real-life” simulations/job sampling; and VII-VIII Community and “real-life” applications. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). SOCIAL SKILLS (M) Credit: 1 (local credit only) Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course is designed to develop life-long social skills to improve individual and group interactions. It will address personal development, relationships, communication skills and cultural awareness. This class is taught based on individual goals and objectives. RECREATION AND LEISURE SKILLS I-IV (T, Skills T) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD committee placement This course will introduce students to functional social skills necessary for successful and enjoyable participation in recreational and leisure activities. Activities and training are centered around equipping students for home, community and school social settings. The scope of this course is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). COMPUTER SKILLS I-IV (T, Skills T) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12+ Prerequisite(s): ARD committee placement This course will provide students with the opportunity to access technology through the use of various computer applications as well as learn to use the internet to collect data and/or gather information for specific class projects. The scope of this course is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP).
  • 55. 55 PERSONAL and FAMILY DEVELOPMENT I-IV (T, Skills T) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement This course allows students to develop skills necessary for caring for personal and family needs. Content includes interpersonal skills, decision making promotion of family strengths and wellbeing and developing positive relationships with peers. Students will use information to make informed choices related to personal hygiene, nutrition, home maintenance, safety and money management. The course will enable students to practice budgeting, develop consumer buying practices and manage family housing needs. This course will provide community learning opportunities. The scope of this course is determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH Students who already have experience in a Language Other Than English (LOTE) should consult the district website for information on placement tests at http://www.georgetownisd.org/ccorner/other/lote.asp or see the counselor. FRENCH I, GERMAN I, LATIN I, SPANISH I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-11 Prerequisite(s): None This course provides an introduction to the five Cs: communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development). SPANISH II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion in Spanish of a diagnostic questionnaire or credit in Spanish I. Students will further explore the five C’s, completing the novice level of proficiency: communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development). After successful completion of this course, a first year Spanish student will be awarded additional credit for Spanish I. PRE-AP SPANISH II FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion in Spanish of a diagnostic questionnaire This course will enable Heritage speakers to Address their special linguistic and cultural needs in studying their mother language, This course will explore the five C’s: communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development).This course will provide opportunities to practice strategies for AP and other college placement exams. After successful completion of this course, a first year Spanish student will be awarded additional credit for Spanish I. FRENCH II, GERMAN II, LATIN II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Credit in Level I This course will enable students to further explore the five C’s, completing the novice level of proficiency: communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development).
  • 56. 56 PRE-AP FRENCH II, PRE-AP GERMAN II, PRE-AP LATIN II, PRE-AP SPANISH II (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Level I, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course will further explore the five Cs, pushing into the intermediate level of proficiency. Students will begin to practice strategies for AP and other college placement exams. It is strongly recommended that students planning to take a level III language select level II PAP in order to be better prepared. PRE-AP FRENCH III, PRE-AP GERMAN III, PRE-AP LATIN III, PRE-AP SPANISH III (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Credit in Levels I and II, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course will further explore the five C’s at the intermediate level of proficiency. The five C’s include: communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development). In addition, grammar and literature will be stressed as students prepare for the AP or other college placement exams. It is strongly recommended that students planning to take a level III language elect level II PAP in order to be better prepared. SPANISH III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Spanish I and II Students will further explore the five Cs: communication (speaking, listening, reading writing); culture (understanding the people, practices, products and perspectives); connections (with other subject areas); comparisons (one’s own culture and language with another); and communities (using language beyond the school setting for personal and career development). This class will not prepare a student for AP IV. This is not a Pre-AP course and students will not receive the weighted grade of a Pre-AP class. AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IV (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Levels I, II, and III, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary with special emphasis on speaking and writing, skills necessary for success on the French Language Exam. The objectives of these courses include developing a strong command of vocabulary and structure, understanding the spoken language in various conversational situations, reading newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary fiction and non-technical writings without the use of a dictionary, and fluently and accurately expressing ideas orally and in writing. The course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. AP GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IV (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Levels I, II, and III, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary with special emphasis on the speaking and writing, skills necessary for success on the AP German Language Exams. The objectives of these courses include developing a strong command of vocabulary and structure, understanding the spoken language in various conversational situations, reading newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary fiction and non-technical writings without the use of a dictionary, and fluently and accurately expressing ideas orally and in writing. The course is designed to promote proficiency in German and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts.
  • 57. 57 AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IV (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Levels I, II, and III, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary with special emphasis on speaking and writing, skills necessary for success on the AP Spanish Language Exam. While students are encouraged to take the AP exam, the skills stressed will be useful in other college placement exams. AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IV FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS (Weighted) Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Pre-AP Spanish II for Heritage Speakers This course is a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary with special emphasis on speaking and writing, skills necessary for success on the AP Spanish Language Exam. While students are encouraged to take the AP exam, the skills stressed will be useful in other college placement exams. The course will enable Heritage Speakers to address their special linguistic and cultural needs in studying their mother language. AP LATIN IV (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Levels I, II, and III, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course will cover the entire required reading list as set by the most current AP Latin IV course description. Students will practice writing translation, analysis, and critical interpretation of the required passages as well as extensive sight reading. Students will become familiar with historical, political, cultural, and social contexts of the Aeneid through extensive ancillary readings and are expected to have read the entire Aeneid in translation over the summer. AP SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE V (Weighted) Credit 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of AP Spanish Language and Culture IV or permission to take concurrently, See Pre-AP/AP Guidelines This course is designed to help the student take the AP Literature test which covers the literature survey courses at most universities. Students will be guided through the readings which may be included on the test. They will receive practice in reading strategies in Spanish. They will learn the literary terms used to discuss various genres of literature. Students will practice writing essays in the forms of the test. Students will be expected to read and write at home and during class time. HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION All students must complete 1 credit of PE or the equivalent for State graduation requirements. The following PE equivalents may be substituted upon completion for the required credits in physical education (including the Foundations of Personal Fitness): drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semesters; NJROTC; and athletics. Students may also request to substitute appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus which meet the criteria in TAC Chapter 74 and are approved by the principal or designee for up to four PE credits toward graduation requirements. A student may not earn more than four credits in physical education toward State graduation requirements. HEALTH Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None In health education, students acquire the health information and skills necessary to become healthy adults and learn about behaviors in which they should and should not participate. To achieve that goal, students will understand the following: students should first seek guidance in the area of health from their parents; personal behaviors can increase or reduce health risks throughout the lifespan; health is influenced by a variety of factors; students can recognize and utilize health information and products; and personal/interpersonal skills are needed to promote individual, family, and community health.
  • 58. 58 FOUNDATIONS OF PERSONAL FITNESS Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): None The Foundations of Personal Fitness represents a new approach in physical education and the concept of personal fitness. The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for lifetime personal fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the corner stone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives-students designing their own personal fitness program PE: INDIVIDUAL TEAM SPORTS Credit: .5 - 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Foundations of Personal Fitness Students in individual sports are expected to participate in a wide range of individual sports and group games that can be pursued for a lifetime. The continued development of health-related fitness and the selection of individual sports activities that are enjoyable is a major objective of this course. Course assessment will be determined by skills participation, team work, a positive attitude and written exams. PE: AEROBIC ACTIVITY (FORMERLY INDIVIDUAL SPORTS II, III WALKING/ JOGGING) Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Foundations of Personal Fitness Students will acquire knowledge and skills for the sport of walking / jogging. They will be introduced to proper technique, training principles, and lifetime wellness concepts that will promote a physically active lifestyle. The continued development of health-related fitness will be a major objective of this course. Course assessment will be determined by skills, participation, and written exams. PE: ADVENTURE OUTDOOR EDUCATION Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Foundations of Personal Fitness This course will enable students to acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity and access to a physically-active lifestyle. Adventure outdoor education will enable students to develop competency in outdoor education activities that provide opportunities for enjoyment and challenge. ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Approval Only Adaptive Physical Education involves adapting, modifying, and changing a physical activity so it is appropriate for the person with a disability. The motor activities focus on the development of fundamental motor skills, which lead to the acquisition of physical fitness, enabling each child to participate to the maximum extent possible in dance, body management, group games, and sports. The physical education staff strives to develop realistic and age-appropriate goals for each child, which challenges each individual to do their best and not give up. The goal is to have an activity where all students can be successful. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered are determined by the student’s individual education plan (IEP). PERSONAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE (T, Skills T) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD Committee Placement The Personal Health and Hygiene courses relate individual health and hygiene behaviors to issues of wellness, disease prevention, interpersonal skill enhancement, and basic employability standards. Students will examine the concepts of human growth and development, emergency and first aid, diet, exercise, and daily hygiene practices as each relates to a healthy lifestyle, job performance, and/or age appropriate environment. Students will define the possible consequences of failing to adhere to these health and hygiene practices. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living.
  • 59. 59 BASEBALL Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements, be placed in the program by written approval of the head baseball coach, and have above average skills This is not a course for players with little baseball ability. Students who are approved for this course are expected to try out for the junior varsity or varsity baseball teams in the spring. An aggressive approach is taken in all phases of team play through advanced conditioning, hitting techniques, and defensive situations. BASKETBALL (BOYS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach Basketball is taught in two parts with the first part taking place before and after the basketball season. First, the basic fundamentals of basketball are taught - shooting, passing, dribbling, rebounding, and defense. Special individual skill attainment is emphasized at this time. A secondary program of conditioning, consisting of weightlifting, running and other exercises that will benefit and strengthen the individual is implemented. The second phase (during the basketball season) places emphasis on competitive team play. Team offense and defense, as well as strategy and specific situation work, are emphasized. BASKETBALL (GIRLS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course prepares girls for competitive basketball. Participants work to develop fundamentals of dribbling, passing, shooting, and defense. The first semester covers fundamentals, strategy and competitive play. The competitive season begins in November and lasts through February. Games and/or practices are also held on Saturday and during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. During the spring off-season students participate in weight training and speed development. FRESHMEN CHEERLEADING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 Prerequisite(s): Mandatory tryouts required Cheerleaders are selected based upon judging during tryouts. Each member of the cheer squad will be scheduled in a class period for the fall and spring semester. The course will provide opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and conditioning necessary to be a successful cheerleader. Various team building strategies will be implemented J.V. AND VARSITY CHEERLEADING COMPETITION SQUAD AND MASCOT Credit: 1-3 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Mandatory tryouts required Cheerleaders are selected based upon judging. The Cheerleading squads will be divided into varsity and J.V. Varsity squad will be double blocked in the fall semester. CROSS-COUNTRY (BOYS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course prepares students for competitive running. Participants work on endurance, speed, and strength. Participants also learn the importance of monitoring the heart rate and good nutrition. The competitive season begins in August and lasts through November. The off-season focuses on weights, agility, and long distance running. CROSS COUNTRY (GIRLS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach
  • 60. 60 This course prepares girls for competitive running. Participants work on endurance, speed, and strength. Participants also learn the importance of monitoring the heart rate and good nutrition. The competitive season begins in August and lasts through November. The off-season focuses on weights, agility, and long distance running. FOOTBALL Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach Participants prepare for one of the five teams competing in scheduled UIL competition, which lasts from August through the end of November or December. During the off-season, students participate in weight training and movement activities that prepare them for all athletic activities. The off-season program and spring football practices are prerequisite for participation in the fall season for students who are enrolled in GISD, unless a student is enrolled in a different athletic period. GOLF (BOYS AND GIRLS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at the recommendation of the coach Golf students receive intermediate or advanced instruction. The intermediate instruction includes a review of basic techniques and strategies. The advanced training stresses team play, as well as advanced strategies and specific situation play. Golf will be offered both fall and spring semesters. SOCCER (BOYS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course will develop all participants to reach the physical fitness needed to participate in competitive soccer. The first semester covers physical training, fundamentals, as well as tactical and competitive play. The second semester will continue as the first semester until the competitive season is over. Soccer season begins in January and ends in March. Off-season will consist of strength training as well as a series of soccer competitions. SOCCER (GIRLS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course prepares girls for competitive soccer. Participants work to develop the fundamental skills and physical fitness needed to compete in this sport. The first semester covers fundamentals, tactics, competitive play, and conditioning. The competitive season begins in January and lasts until mid-March. During the off-season students participate in a variety of strength and cardiovascular conditioning activities, including off-season track, weight training and plyometrics. SOFTBALL Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course prepares girls for competitive fast pitch softball. Participants work to develop all phases of the game including advanced conditioning, hitting, defensive fundamentals and technique. The fall focuses on conditioning, fundamentals, technique, and strategy. Softball season begins in February and lasts through May. SPORTS MEDICINE I Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Athletic Trainer Approval Only This course provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components of sports medicine including but not limited to: sports medicine related careers, organizational and administrative considerations, prevention of athletic injuries, recognition, evaluation, and immediate care of athletic injuries, rehabilitation and management skills, taping and wrapping techniques, first
  • 61. 61 aid/CPR/AED, emergency procedures, nutrition, sports psychology, human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise. This course will require outside-of-class time and involve working with athletes and athletic teams. SPORTS MEDICINE II Credit: .5-1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion of Sports Medicine I and Athletic Trainer Approval Only This course provides an opportunity for the study and application of the components of sports medicine including but not limited to: sports medicine related careers, organizational and administrative considerations, prevention of athletic injuries, recognition, evaluation, and immediate care of athletic injuries, rehabilitation and management skills, taping and wrapping techniques, first aid/CPR/AED, emergency procedures, nutrition, sports psychology, human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise. This course will require outside-of-class time and involve working with athletes and athletic teams. SWIMMING Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach Students who participate in swimming must be able to compete at a varsity level and be able to perform all four competitive strokes. Practices will begin after the first week of school. Tryouts for the team will be two weeks after the school year begins. The top 19 swimmers (both girls and boys) will remain on the team. The first three weeks concentration will be stroke mechanics and turns. As the season continues the team will begin conditioning and swim 5,000-7,000 yards per day. The competitive season begins in October and ends in February. During the off-season we will continue to swim and cross train and participate in meets in March and in April. Practices will be during 4th and 8th periods and continue after school. Students must provide their own transportation home. TENNIS Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach Students enrolled for competitive tennis already have a basic understanding of the rules and at least average skill development. These levels of tennis instruction are designed to enhance a student’s current skill level, with emphasis on technique and strategy, through complex drills. Team members are expected to display their expertise as they participate in tournaments. TRACK (GIRLS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course develops girls for competitive running, jumping, hurdling, and throwing. The first semester off-season track program includes plyometrics, strength training, flexibility, form, speed, and endurance training. Track season officially begins in the spring semester with after-school practices beginning in February. During the spring semester we continue to work on strength and speed, however workouts are more event-specific. Track meets are held February through May. TRACK (BOYS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach Students receive extensive training in the development of track and field techniques. During the first semester work is concentrated on the development of long distance running. Cross-Country meets are held on Saturday and all students are expected to attend these meets. Cross Country and Track and Field will field three teams: Varsity, Junior Varsity, and Freshmen. Training continues in the second semester in preparation for spring track and field competition. Students may participate on one of three teams: Varsity, Junior Varsity, or Freshmen. VOLLEYBALL (GIRLS) Credit: .5-2 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach
  • 62. 62 Tryouts will be held in August. Participants who are selected for one of four competitive teams will be placed in the class. Participants work to develop fundamentals in passing, serving, spiking, blocking, team chemistry, digging, and offensive/defensive techniques. Participants will also learn the rules, regulations and terminology associated with the sport. The competitive season runs from August through November. In the spring, the off-season will focus on conditioning, weight training, plyometrics, and individual and team fundamentals. WRESTLING (BOYS) Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9–12 Prerequisite(s): Must meet all UIL requirements and be placed in the program at recommendation of the coach This course prepares individuals for the physical and technical skills required for competitive collegiate wrestling. Participants work on fundamental technique, strength, agility and endurance daily. Participants will develop grappling skills, as well as learn the rules, regulations, and terminology associated with the sport. The first semester focuses on preparing individuals for the competitive season which runs from November to February. The second semester focuses on strength and conditioning. FINE ARTS ART I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Art I is a beginning art class covering perception, creative expression, art history, and aesthetic judgment. All art work will illustrate, compare, and contrast the elements of art. Students will demonstrate proper use of various art media, compare and contrast different art styles and trends throughout history and apply aesthetic judgment in evaluating artwork. Students must provide some supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART II DRAWING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Art I Drawing II is a second year art class focusing on creative expression while exploring different drawing media and techniques. Continuing use of the Elements and the Principles of Art will make students more aware of individual strengths and interests. Students will be introduced to art criticism and analysis. Students must provide some supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART II PAINTING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Art I Painting II is a second year art class focusing on creative expression while exploring different painting media and techniques, illustrating color theory, and color schemes. Also included are more advanced work with perception, creative expression, art history, and aesthetic judgment of various painted artworks. Art criticism and analysis will also take place through the study of leading painters and their artworks. Students must provide some supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART II SCULPTURE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Art I This class is designed for the visual art student who wants to focus in the 3D aspects of the Visual Arts. Students will study various 3D artworks from past to present, plus sketch, design, and build their own sculptures. Students will use conventional and unconventional materials, methods, and tools to create artworks. Students are expected to help provide basic supplies, tools, including an art fee of up to $30.
  • 63. 63 ART II CERAMICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Art I Ceramics II is an advanced studio class designed to enhance the Art I components of form and texture. Students will be encouraged to discover their own three-dimensional artistic voice in this exciting art form. Students will use a wide range of hand-building and wheel throwing techniques with earthen clay while gaining insight into the history of various world cultures through the study of this ancient art form. Functional, sculptural and decorative artwork will be produced. Students will be expected to keep and use a sketchbook for documenting, problem solving and critiquing art works and techniques. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART II PHOTOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Art I Students will understand and execute the Elements of Art and Principles of Design through the lens of a camera. Students will study the work of photographers and videographers in the world of art dating back to the beginning of the processes. Students will analyze work and apply newly developed concepts to works that are individually produced. This course is designed to give students the photographic fundamentals needed to begin an area of concentration in the visual arts. Students may be expected to provide some equipment. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART III CERAMICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Art II Ceramics Ceramics III is a more highly advanced, continuation of Ceramics II and is designed for the serious art student. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art curriculum. Students will experience various earthen clay, glazes, stains and mixed media techniques while using a higher level of problem solving skills. Students will become more involved in the production of glazes, operating the kiln and producing more thought provoking art works. Students will be expected to keep and use a sketchbook for documenting, problem solving and critiquing art works and techniques. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART III DRAWING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Art II Drawing Drawing III is a more highly advanced, continuation of Drawing II and is designed for the serious art student. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art curriculum. Students will problem-solve while experiencing new drawing media techniques. The course will assist students with the beginning construction of a portfolio for AP Art courses or university-level studies Students must provide some supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course.
  • 64. 64 ART III PAINTING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Art II Painting Painting III is a more highly advanced, continuation of Painting II and is designed for the serious art student wishing to pursue a career in the visual arts through design while preparing a strong portfolio. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art curriculum. Art criticism and analysis will also take place through the study of leading painters and their artworks. Students will be expected to keep and use a sketchbook and may be expected to provide additional supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART III PHOTOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Art II Photography Students will explore photography and video from an alternative viewpoint. Students will work with sculpture and installation projects incorporating photography and video that is student produced. Students will explore many conceptual ideas while solving visual through the use of various mediums. Students will learn to work as a group building large scale works along with smaller independent projects creating a cohesive group installation. The course will assist students with the beginning construction of a portfolio for AP Art courses or university-level studies Students may be expected to provide some equipment. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART III SCULPTURE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Art II Sculpture This class is designed for the visual art student who wants to continue to focus in the 3-D aspects of the Visual Arts. Students will study various 3-D artworks from past to present, plus sketch, design, and build their own sculptures. Students will use conventional and unconventional materials, methods, and tools to create artworks. Students are expected to have prior knowledge of various 3-D techniques. Students are expected to help provide basic supplies, tools, including an art fee of up to $30. ART IV CERAMICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Art III Ceramics Ceramics IV is a more highly advanced, continuation of Ceramics III and is designed for the serious art student. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art curriculum. Students will experience various earthen clay, glazes, stains and mixed media techniques while using a higher level of problem solving skills. Students will become more involved in the production of glazes, operating the kiln and producing more thought provoking art works. Students will be expected to keep and use a sketchbook for documenting, problem solving and critiquing art works and techniques. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART IV DRAWING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Art III Drawing Drawing IV is a more highly advanced, continuation of Drawing III and is designed for the serious art student. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art curriculum. Students will problem-solve while experiencing new drawing media techniques. The course will assist students with the beginning construction of a portfolio for AP Art courses or university-level studies Students must provide some supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART IV PAINTING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Art III Painting Painting IV is a more highly advanced, continuation of Painting III and is designed for the serious art student wishing to pursue a career in the visual arts through design while preparing a strong portfolio. The course continues the upward spiral of the visual art
  • 65. 65 curriculum. Art criticism and analysis will also take place through the study of leading painters and their artworks. Students will be expected to keep and use a sketchbook and may be expected to provide additional supplies. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART IV PHOTOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Art III Photography Students will continue to explore photography and video from even more alternative viewpoints. Students focus on building a strong portfolio for AP Art courses and college applications. Students’ work will involve more conceptual ideas and continued use of alternative processes with an emphasis on independent study. Students may be expected to provide some equipment. There may be an art lab fee of up to $30 for this course. ART IV SCULPTURE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Art III Sculpture This class is designed for the visual art student who wants to continue to focus in the 3-D aspects of the Visual Arts. Students will study various 3-D artworks from past to present, plus sketch, design, and build their own sculptures. Students will use conventional and unconventional materials, methods, and tools to create artworks. Students are expected to have prior knowledge of various 3-D techniques. Students are expected to help provide basic supplies, tools, including an art fee of up to $30. . AP STUDIO ART: 2-D DESIGN Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): 2 Art credits and teacher recommendation This class is designed for the advanced visual art student to compile a quality portfolio of original 2-D artworks. Students will meet the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Program in an independent study environment. Students will work collaboratively with faculty to select appropriate media and will demonstrate mastery of various 2-D design techniques including, but not limited to: graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting and printmaking. Students are expected to provide basic supplies for this course and pay all fees associated with obtaining design materials. Student is responsible for photographing the submitted artworks. There will likely be extensive supply costs for this course. AP STUDIO ART: 3-D DESIGN Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): 2 Art credits and teacher recommendation This class is designed for the advanced visual art student to compile a quality portfolio of original 3-D sculptures and/or ceramic artworks. Students will meet the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Program in an independent study environment. Students will work collaboratively with faculty to select appropriate media and will demonstrate mastery of various 3-D design techniques. Students are expected to provide basic supplies for this course and pay all fees associated with obtaining design materials. Student is responsible for photographing the submitted artworks. There will likely be extensive supply costs for this course. DANCE I Credit: 1 (Fine Arts and/or PE Credit is available) Grade Placement: 9-12 Co-Ed Prerequisite(s): None Dance I is a course designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of dance. This class will include basic dance technique and history in genres such as ballet, modern, jazz, social, folk and choreography. Students receive Fine Arts and/or P.E. credit for this course. Fall and/or spring after school rehearsals and recital participation is required. Course expectations include specific skills acquired in “Foundations of Personal Fitness”. Students are required to provide some supplies and pay a materials fee of up to $30.
  • 66. 66 DANCE II Credit: 1 (Fine Arts and/or PE Credit is available) Grade Placement: 10-12 Co-Ed Prerequisite(s): Dance I or Teacher Approval Dance II is a course designed to allow students a more in-depth study of the fundamentals of dance. This class will include more in- depth dance techniques in ballet, modern, jazz, improvisation, and choreography as well as an overview of dance history. Students receive Fine Arts and/or P.E. credit for this course. Fall and/or spring after school rehearsals and recital participation is required. Course expectations include specific skills acquired in “Foundations of Personal Fitness”. Students are required to provide some supplies and pay a materials fee of up to $30. DANCE III Credit: 1 (Fine Arts and/or PE Credit is available) Grade Placement: 11-12 Co-Ed Prerequisite(s): Dance II or Teacher Approval Dance III is a course designed to allow students a more in-depth study of dance technique in ballet, modern, jazz, improvisation, and choreography as well as an overview of dance history. The course continues the upward spiral of the dance curriculum. Students receive Fine Arts and/or P.E. credit for this course. Fall and/or spring after school rehearsals and recital participation is required as well as attendance at outside-of-school dance events. Course expectations include specific skills acquired in “Foundations of Personal Fitness”. Students are required to provide some supplies and pay a materials fee of up to $30. DANCE IV Credit: 1 (Fine Arts and/or PE Credit is available) Grade Placement: 12 Co-Ed Prerequisite(s): Dance III or Teacher Approval Dance IV is a course designed to allow students a more in-depth study of dance technique in ballet, modern, jazz, improvisation, and choreography as well as an overview of dance history. The course continues the upward spiral of the dance curriculum. Students receive Fine Arts and/or P.E. credit for this course. Fall and/or spring after school rehearsals and recital participation is required as well as attendance at outside-of-school dance events. Course expectations include specific skills acquired in “Foundations of Personal Fitness”. Students are required to provide some supplies and pay a materials fee of up to $30. DANCE I - CHOREOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher Approval Choreography I is an advanced dance class focusing on the choreography for one of the extra-curricular dance organizations – Dance Team or Color Guard. This class is highly focused on independent study with individualized training in specific areas of specialization. This year-long course may include additional performances outside of the dance organization. Students receive a local credit for this course. DANCE II - CHOREOGRAPHY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher Approval A continuation of Choreography I, Choreography II is an even more advanced dance class focusing on the choreography for one of the extra-curricular dance organizations – Dance Team or Color Guard. This class is highly focused on independent study with individualized training in specific areas of specialization. This year-long course may include additional performances outside of the dance organization. Students receive a local credit for this course.
  • 67. 67 DANCE I, II, III, IV - COLOR GUARD Credit: 1(.5 P.E., .5 Fine Arts) Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Audition Only Color guard is a year-round class in which students learn dance and body principals and apply them to the art of color guard and it’s components of flag, rifle, saber, and various props. The year includes performances and participation at summer camps, football games and contests with the Marching Band, public and community performances, recitals, as well as Winterguard competitions in the Spring semester. Before and after school practice is required as well as one class period for each semester. Students may receive a PE or Fine Arts Credit for this course. There are required fees for this course. DANCE I, II, III, IV - DANCE TEAM Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Audition Only Dance Team is an extra-curricular activity based upon the dance curriculum. Dance Team members are selected only by audition near the end of the spring semester. The dance team participates in many outside-of-the-school-day performances including, but not limited to, events with the marching band, football games, pep rallies, parades, basketball games, dance competitions, various spring performances and summer camps/training. Before and/or after school practice is required as well as one class period for each semester. There are required fees for this course. BAND 1 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 - or first year of high school band Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in a band class the previous year or instructor approval This full year course continues the development of performance techniques, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure developed in previous band classes. Students enrolled in Band 1 will develop self-discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular band class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Band 1 – regardless of the particular band class – are required to participate in marching band during the first semester. Because of this marching band requirement, students enrolled in Band 1 receive Physical Education (P.E.) credit during the fall semester and fine arts credit in the spring semester. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. BAND 2 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 - or second year of high school band Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in a band class the previous year or instructor approval This full year course continues the development of performance techniques, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure developed in previous band classes. Students enrolled in Band 2 will develop self-discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular band class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Band 2 – regardless of the particular band class – are required to participate in marching band during the first semester. Because of this marching band requirement, students enrolled in Band 2 receive Physical Education (P.E.) credit during the fall semester and fine arts credit in the spring semester. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. BAND 3 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 - or third year of high school band Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in a band class the previous year or instructor approval This full year course continues the development of performance techniques, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in previous band classes. The course continues the upward spiral of the band curriculum. Students enrolled in Band 3 will develop self-discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular band class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Band 3 – regardless of the particular band class – are required to participate in marching band during the first semester. Because of this marching band requirement, students enrolled in
  • 68. 68 Band 3 receive Physical Education (P.E.) credit during the fall semester and fine arts credit in the spring semester. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. BAND 4 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 - or fourth year of high school band Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in a band class the previous year or instructor approval This full year course continues the development of performance techniques, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in previous band classes. The course continues the upward spiral of the band curriculum. Students enrolled in Band 4 will develop self-discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular band class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Band 4 – regardless of the particular band class – are required to participate in marching band during the first semester. Because of this marching band requirement, students enrolled in Band 4 receive Physical Education (P.E.) credit during the fall semester and fine arts credit in the spring semester. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV - BAND ONLY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval and concurrent enrollment in Band I, II, III or IV Students develop greater technique in producing characteristic tone while enhancing skills in music reading, performance and ensemble methods. NOTE: There is no PE waiver for Instrumental Ensemble. JAZZ ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Instructor Approval, concurrent enrollment in Band I - IV or Orchestra I – IV, and audition Jazz Ensemble is a course for advanced, experienced musicians showing an interest and understanding of the jazz idiom. Students will study and perform a wide variety of jazz styles. Students not concurrently enrolled in band or orchestra may audition for membership under special circumstances with permission of the instructor. Students may be placed into differing sections of Jazz Ensemble based upon skill level exhibited in audition. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. CHOIR I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 - or first year of high school choir Prerequisite(s): None This full-year course continues the development of singing – performance technique, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in middle school choir. Students enrolled in Choir 1 will develop greater self-discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular choir class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Choir 1 – regardless of the particular choir class – are required to participate in curricular events and will be asked to participate in some outside-of-the-school-day extra-curricular events. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. CHOIR 2 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 - or second year of high school choir Prerequisite(s): Choir 1 This full-year course continues the development of singing – performance technique, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in Choir 1. Students enrolled in Choir 2 will develop greater self- discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular choir class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Choir 2 – regardless of the particular choir class – are required to participate in curricular events and will be asked to participate in some outside-of-the-school-day extra-curricular events. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course.
  • 69. 69 CHOIR 3 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 – or third year of high school choir Prerequisite(s): Choir 2 This full-year course continues the development of singing – performance technique, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in Choir 2. Students enrolled in Choir 3 will develop greater self- discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular choir class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Choir 3 – regardless of the particular choir class – are required to participate in curricular events and will be asked to participate in some outside-of-the-school-day extra-curricular events. Students will be expected to provide supplies and these are certain fees connected to the course. CHOIR 4 Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 - or fourth year of high school choir Prerequisite(s): Choir 3 This full-year course continues the development of singing – performance technique, music reading skills, listening skills, music theory knowledge and music history exposure previously developed in Choir 3. Students enrolled in Choir 4 will develop greater self- discipline, problem-solving skills, leadership skills, time-management skills and continually work with peers as part of a musical performance team. Students will be placed into a particular choir class or section based upon ability demonstrated by audition. All students enrolled in Choir 4 – regardless of the particular choir class – are required to participate in curricular events and will be asked to participate in some outside-of-the-school-day extra-curricular events. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. VOCAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV - CHOIR ONLY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval and concurrent enrollment in Choir I, II, III or IV Students develop greater technique in producing characteristic vocal tone while enhancing skills in music reading, performance and ensemble methods. This course will cover the State adopted vocal ensemble curriculum which includes the study of various choral and solo literature. ORCHESTRA I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9 – or first year of high school orchestra Prerequisite(s): Middle School Orchestra, Instructor Approval or private instruction required Orchestra is for experienced musicians desiring to improve musical performance skills on string instruments while performing orchestral repertoire. Students will audition and be placed into a particular orchestra class based on skill level and instrumentation needs. Students in Orchestra are provided with multiple opportunities for individual achievement through extra-curricular auditions and competitions. Attendance at rehearsals and performances outside of normal school hours is required. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. ORCHESTRA II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10 - or second year of high school orchestra Prerequisite(s): Orchestra I, Instructor approval or private instruction required Orchestra is for experienced musicians desiring to improve musical performance skills on string instruments while performing orchestral repertoire. Students will audition and be placed into a particular orchestra class based on skill level and instrumentation needs. Students in Orchestra are provided with multiple opportunities for individual achievement through extra-curricular auditions and competitions. Attendance at rehearsals and performances outside of normal school hours is required. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course.
  • 70. 70 ORCHESTRA III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11 - or third year of high school orchestra Prerequisite(s): Orchestra II, Instructor approval or private instruction required Orchestra is for experienced musicians desiring to improve musical performance skills on string instruments while performing orchestral repertoire. The course continues the upward spiral of the orchestra curriculum. Students will audition and be placed into a particular orchestra class based on skill level and instrumentation needs. Students in Orchestra are provided with multiple opportunities for individual achievement through extra-curricular auditions and competitions. Attendance at rehearsals and performances outside of normal school hours is required. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. ORCHESTRA IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 - or fourth year of high school orchestra Prerequisite(s): Orchestra III, Instructor approval, or private instruction required Orchestra is for experienced musicians desiring to improve musical performance skills on string instruments while performing orchestral repertoire. The course continues the upward spiral of the orchestra curriculum. Students will audition and be placed into a particular orchestra class based on skill level and instrumentation needs. Students in Orchestra are provided with multiple opportunities for individual achievement through extra-curricular auditions and competitions. Attendance at rehearsals and performances outside of normal school hours is required. Students will be expected to provide supplies and there are certain fees connected to the course. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV - ORCHESTRA ONLY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval and concurrent enrollment in Orchestra I, II, III or IV Instrumental Ensemble – Orchestra serves students already enrolled in the orchestra in two ways. The course provides time to develop technique in a small group environment during school hours. The course can also provide the opportunity for a student to begin study on an alternate string instrument. For instance, a student already enrolled in orchestra as a violinist could have the opportunity to learn to play viola, cello, or bass. MUSIC AND MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None (Students should not be enrolled in Band, Choir or Orchestra) Music and Media Communications is designed to provide access to rigorous and relevant instruction in music and media-based skills for those students who may not have an extensive background in formal music training. The course is based on an integrated set of skills and knowledge standards in music and technology applications as well as College and Career Readiness and 21st Century Preparedness Skills. Students will explore and discover their own connections to music and their musicality using technology and media-based resources for listening, recording, sharing, composing and making music. Students will also analyze the presence of music in contemporary contexts and media, review fundamental musical concepts, and be introduced to skills and knowledge required for some music-related technical professions. The course is used to provide access to music instruction for students who have not or were not able to enter traditional music performance pathways such as band, choir or orchestra. Throughout the course, students will compile a digital portfolio of work that demonstrates skill and understanding. This course is available for state elective credit only. MUSIC THEORY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Concurrent or previous enrollment in high school band, choir or orchestra Students enrolled in music theory will receive comprehensive instruction in the musical areas of counterpoint, harmony, chords, scales, and musical forms and part-writing. Students will also acquire and advance individual skills in sight-reading, sight-singing and ear training.
  • 71. 71 AP MUSIC THEORY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Music Theory or teacher approval AP Music Theory should be considered a college level music theory course. This course includes advanced study in the musical areas of counterpoint, harmony, chords, scales, musical forms and part-writing. Advanced harmony and part-writing will be covered as well as advanced ear training. Students are expected to take the AP Music Theory Exam near the end of this course. Thus, the primary focus for the course is preparing for the exam. THEATRE I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Theater I is a full year course designed to introduce the student to theater. The class will include theater terminology, mime, improvisation, characterization, movement, voice and diction, scene study, performance, and some elements of technical theater. Students are required to attend and analyze live theatrical events held outside of regular school hours. THEATRE II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Theatre I Theatre II is a full year course designed to continue student growth in the study of theater. Students will experience theatrical literature of greater complexity, continue in-depth scene study and characterization, and demonstrate advanced acting techniques. Students are required to attend and analyze live theatrical events held outside of regular school hours. THEATRE III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Theatre II Theatre III is a full year course designed to extend and continue the advanced experiences in Theatre II. The course continues the upward spiral of the theater curriculum. Scene study, theatre history, performance, auditioning, directing, and playwriting are studied in greater depth. Students will have “hands-on” experience in directing, playwriting, auditioning, and will work with problems of production and performance. Students are required to attend and analyze live theatrical events held outside of regular school hours. THEATRE IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Theatre III Theatre IV is a full year course designed to extend and continue the advanced experiences in Theatre III. The course continues the upward spiral of the theater curriculum. Scene study, theatre history, performance, auditioning, directing, and playwriting are studied at the most advanced level. Students will have even more “hands-on” experience in directing, playwriting, auditioning, and will also work with problems of production and performance. Students are required to attend and analyze live theatrical events held outside of regular school hours. THEATRE PRODUCTION Credit: .5 to 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Concurrent or previous enrollment in an approved Theater course and be a member of a production cast or crew Theatre Production is scheduled after school as rehearsals and performances. Theatre Production is a curricular theater lab class. The course comes into existence when auditions are held for a production and is designed to give students credit for work in play production activities scheduled outside of regular school hours. Thus, students do not enroll in this course, but may receive ½ unit of credit when 80 hours of work are completed on a theater production outside of regular school hours. The hours are cumulative and a student may need to participate in more than one production before earning ½ to 1 credit.
  • 72. 72 TECHNICAL THEATRE I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Theatre I (previous or concurrent) or teacher recommendation This is a full year course in which students are introduced to the practice and design of theatrical sets, scenery, lighting, sound, costumes, properties and makeup. Students will gain training in stage management and stage crew work. Students will begin a professional portfolio with items in each of the aforementioned areas. All students are required to fulfill minimum work hours outside of the school day and write a review of a live theatrical performance seen during each grading cycle. Additionally, students may work as crew members for the annual musical and the UIL One-Act Play Festival. Students will be expected to paint, move heavy/dirty equipment, work with power tools, and work with hot electrical equipment. Students must exhibit a healthy respect for the safety of themselves and those near them. TECHNICAL THEATRE II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Technical Theatre I or teacher recommendation This is a full year course in which students research and design theatrical sets, scenery, lighting, sound, costumes, properties and makeup. Students will gain training and experience in stage management and stage crew work. Students will begin a professional portfolio with items in each of the aforementioned areas. All students are required to fulfill minimum work hours outside of the school day during each grading cycle. Additionally, students will work as crew members for the annual musical and the UIL One-Act Play Festival. Crews for performances and events at the Klett PAC and/or the EVHS Theater are also chosen from members of this class. Students can earn additional theater production credit by serving in this capacity. Students will be expected to paint, move heavy/dirty equipment, work with power tools, and work with hot electrical equipment. Students must exhibit a healthy respect for the safety of themselves and those near them. TECHNICAL THEATRE III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Technical Theatre II or teacher recommendation This is a full year course in which students research and design theatrical sets, scenery, lighting, sound, costumes, properties and makeup. Students will gain training and experience in stage management and stage crew work. Students will begin a professional portfolio with items in each of the aforementioned areas. All students are required to fulfill minimum work hours outside of the school day during each grading cycle. Additionally, students will work as crew members for the annual musical and the UIL One-Act Play Festival. Crews for performances and events at the Klett PAC and/or the EVHS Theater are also chosen from members of this class. Students can earn additional theater production credit by serving in this capacity. Students will be expected to paint, move heavy/dirty equipment, work with power tools, and work with hot electrical equipment. Students must exhibit a healthy respect for the safety of themselves and those near them. TECHNICAL THEATRE IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Technical Theatre III or teacher recommendation This is a full year course in which students research and design theatrical sets, scenery, lighting, sound, costumes, properties and makeup. Students will gain training and experience in stage management and stage crew work. Students will begin a professional portfolio with items in each of the aforementioned areas. All students are required to fulfill minimum work hours outside of the school day during each grading cycle. Additionally, students will work as crew members for the annual musical and the UIL One-Act Play Festival. Crews for performances and events at the Klett PAC and/or the EVHS Theater are also chosen from members of this class. Students can earn additional theater production credit by serving in this capacity. Students will be expected to paint, move heavy/dirty equipment, work with power tools, and work with hot electrical equipment. Students must exhibit a healthy respect for the safety of themselves and those near them.
  • 73. 73 PERFORMING ARTS FACILITY MANAGEMENT Credit: 1 (local credit only) Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Technical Theater I, Band I, Choir I or Orchestra I Students learn facility and event management while working with the GISD Technical Director to maintain the performing facility; prepare it for events and working at those events. Skills include rigging, audio engineering and reinforcement, theatrical lighting, drafting and information management. COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS (T, Skills T) Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): ARD committee placement In order to participate in vocational, community, and social settings, students must develop effective communication modified to their individual learning.. Instruction will focus on developing verbal skills, effective non-verbal behaviors, listening for desired results to increase communication. The scope of this course and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). This class meets the state requirement for graduation. DEBATE I, II Credit: 1-2 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher recommendation Developing research and critical thinking skills while increasing the student’s ability to persuade are the goals of this course. Students analyze contemporary issues and controversial issues as a means to find solutions and examine truths. The definition of debate is “organized argument,” and this course is excellent preparation for college and professional careers. Preparation and presentation of debates are required in class and at speech tournaments. Students must attend at least one after school practice per week. DEBATE III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher recommendation Developing advanced research and critical thinking skills while increasing the student’s ability to persuade are the goals of this course. Students analyze contemporary issues and controversial issues as a means to find solutions and examine truths. The definition of debate is “organized argument,” and this course is excellent preparation for college and professional careers. Preparation and presentation of debates are required in class and at speech tournaments. Students must attend at least one after school practice per week. DEBATE IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher recommendation Developing advanced research and critical thinking skills while increasing the student’s ability to persuade are the goals of this course. Students analyze contemporary issues and controversial issues as a means to find solutions and examine truths. The definition of debate is “organized argument,” and this course is excellent preparation for college and professional careers. Preparation and presentation of debates are required in class and at speech tournaments. Students must attend at least one after school practice per week.
  • 74. 74 ORAL INTERPRETATION I, Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher recommendation This course is a study of performance of literature. Students research various authors, literary mediums, and genres. Students analyze and conduct oral performances of literature. Students will study and gain appreciation for the intellectual and aesthetic dimensions of literary texts. Significant blocks of time are provided for reading, preparing and presenting oral performances. Performance choices include humorous, dramatic, and duet acting, poetry, prose, and group improvisation. Self-motivation and participation in speech tournaments are required. ORAL INTERPRETATION II, III Credit: 1-4 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Teacher recommendation This course is an advanced study of performance of literature. Students research various authors, literary mediums, and genres. Students analyze and conduct oral performances of literature. Students will study and gain appreciation for the intellectual and aesthetic dimensions of literary texts. Significant blocks of time are provided for reading, preparing and presenting oral performances. Performance choices include humorous, dramatic, and duet acting, poetry, prose, and group improvisation. Self-motivation and participation in speech tournaments are required. ANALYSIS OF VISUAL MEDIA Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Principle areas of analysis will be film, television and advertising. The student will learn critical viewing techniques and the media’s influence on, as well as the representation of, society. Topics will include film and television editing and production, cameral shots and angles, and propaganda techniques and stereotypes. The intent of this course is to help the student become a more savvy and discerning consumer. CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION Career and Technical Education in Georgetown I.S.D. is focused on meeting the individual needs of all students by providing curricula to meet the demands of our 21st Century global economy. It is the goal of Georgetown’s Career and Technical Education Program to provide for relevant, career-related experiences and rigorous high-quality academic instruction to ensure that each and every student attains mastery of the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve a lifetime of success. Additionally, Georgetown ISD is committed to our partnerships. We recognize our role and responsibility in preparing students to meet the future employment needs of these entities to maintain the health and well-being of our local, area, and state-wide economy and our society at-large. NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT All students have the opportunity to enroll in Career and Technical Education courses along with the more traditional academic courses. Enrollment in Career and Technical Education courses is open to all qualified students without regard to race, color, creed, religious affiliation, sex or handicapping conditions. Safety is an important part of elective course work and must be demonstrated before students are allowed to work. PROGRAMS OF STUDY Georgetown ISD uses the Achieve Texas initiative to provide students with a rigorous and relevant high school experience. The Achieve Texas initiative organizes occupations and broad industry into career clusters based upon commonalities. Therefore, each student, working collaboratively with his/her parents and school counselor, will have
  • 75. 75 the opportunity to develop an individualized four, six, or eight-year Program of Study tied to future interest and career goal. A Program of Study is a comprehensive plan designed to support college/career readiness through the strategic alignment of foundational academic, career-related technical, and enrichment courses which fosters multiple postsecondary options as related to each individual student’s interest(s). Students completing any of the GISD Programs of Study will graduate prepared for post- secondary education, technical training, and/or entry-level career placement. CTE MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Georgetown Independent School District’s Career and Technical Education department is to better prepare students for postsecondary education, or entry into the workforce by providing state of the art instruction and practical, hands-on lab experience from highly qualified staff and to assist students in becoming successful, critical thinking, competent and caring individuals through real world experience, guidance and leadership. Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge in agriculture. This course allows students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, personal development, globalization, industry standards, details, practices, and expectations. To prepare for success, students need to have opportunities to learn, reinforce, experience, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. EQUINE SCIENCE Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, horses, donkeys, and mules. LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Animal species to be addressed in this course may include, but are not limited to, beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and poultry. ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in the field of energy and natural resource systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to energy and natural resources and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need to have opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to explore the interdependency of the public and natural resource systems related to energy production. In addition, renewable, sustainable, and environmentally friendly practices will be explored.
  • 76. 76 WILDLIFE, FISHERIES AND ECOLOGY MANAGEMENT Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in natural resource systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to natural resources, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the management of game and non-game wildlife species, fish, and aqua crops and their ecological needs as related to current agricultural practices, PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS OF FLORAL DESIGN Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in floral design, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge as well as technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop students' ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral enterprises. A student may earn industry-recognized certification in this course. This course counts as a Fine Arts graduation credit. HORTICULTURE SCIENCE Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in horticultural systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticulture and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of common horticultural management practices as they relate to food and ornamental plant production. AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS AND METAL TECHNOLOGIES Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge; acquire technical knowledge and skills related to power, structural, and technical agricultural systems and the industry; and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of agricultural mechanics as it relates to safety and skills in tool operation, electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, fencing, concrete, and metal working techniques. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES DESIGN AND FABRICATION Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Ag Mechanics and Metal Technologies To be prepared for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to agricultural power, structural and technical systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and technical skills in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of agricultural power sytems, metal fabrications techniques, agricultural structures, electrical controls, and land and water management systems. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course.
  • 77. 77 LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND TURF GRASS MANAGEMENT Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in horticultural systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of landscape and turf grass management techniques and practices. VETERINARY MEDICAL APPLICATIONS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, veterinary practices as they relate to both large and small animal species. ADVANCED ANIMAL SCIENCE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Minimum of one credit from the courses in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Cluster To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. Successful completion of this course will count as a fourth year of science graduation requirement. PRACTICUM IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Minimum of one credit from the courses in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Cluster The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 78. 78 Architecture & Construction PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Principles of Architecture and Construction provides an overview to the various fields of architecture, interior design, construction science, and construction technology. Achieving proficiency in decision making and problem solving is an essential skill for career planning and lifelong learning. Students use self-knowledge, educational, and career information to set and achieve realistic career and educational goals. Job-specific, skilled training can be provided through the use of training modules to identify career goals in trade and industry areas. Safety and career opportunities are included, in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom such as communications; problem solving and critical thinking; Information Technology Applications; systems; safety, health, and environmental; leadership and teamwork; ethics and legal responsibilities; employability and career development; technical skills; introduction to hand tools; introduction to power tools; basic rigging; and reading technical drawings. A student may earn industry- recognized certification in this course. INTERIOR DESIGN Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Architecture and Construction Interior Design is a technical course that addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Individuals use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and compete in industry. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Architecture and Construction In Construction Technology, students gain knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the workforce as carpenters or building maintenance supervisors or prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students acquire knowledge and skills in safety, tool usage, building materials, codes, and framing. ADVANCED DESIGN/PRE-CONSTRUCTION Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion/concurrent enrollment in appropriate college preparatory mathematics and science courses Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3-D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects as related to students’ career/postsecondary interest(s). A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of course. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 79. 79 Arts, A/V Technology & Communications PRINCIPLES OF ART, AV TECH, AND COMMUNICATION Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Careers in the Arts, Audio Video Technology and Communications career cluster require, in addition to creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and education requirements for those opportunities. The goal of this course is to create a culture of high expectation and continuous improvement that provides students with a foundation for success in high school, future studies, and careers. Students explore college and career planning within specific career cluster(s). The students research labor market information, learn job seeking skills, and create documents required for employment. Students use self- knowledge to explore and set realistic goals. Districts have the flexibility of offering career exploration knowledge and skills in a variety of instructional arrangements. JOURNALISM I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Journalism students learn to write for a variety of audiences using different styles of journalistic writing. Students will become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. Students will learn about the history of U. S. media, press law, and media ethics and responsibility. An emphasis will be placed on journalistic writing. Students should have access to a digital camera throughout the year. Students will be required to cover some after school events for the yearbook. PHOTOJOURNALISM I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students take photographs, develop negatives, and print photos in a darkroom setting. Students also learn to take photos and download from digital cameras and manipulate them on a computer. This class also has a journalism component for nine weeks during which students learn to write news stories, feature articles, captions and headlines. Students produce photos and articles appropriate for use in the school newspaper and yearbook. Note: Students must have access to a 35mm and a digital camera. There is a $20.00 lab fee for this course. ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Journalism or Photojournalism I This is the class that produces the school newspaper. Students apply techniques of layout by designing pages and by writing copy, cut lines, and headlines, as well as by cropping pictures using desktop publishing software. They also sell advertisements to local merchants, gaining knowledge of the business community. Students will be required to cover events and work outside of regular school hours. ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Journalism I or Photojournalism I Students apply techniques of graphic design by designing pages and by writing copy, cut lines and head-lines, as well as by cropping pictures using desktop publishing software. They also sell advertisements to local merchants, gaining knowledge of the business community. Students will be required to cover events and work outside of regular school hours. Note: Summer hours may be necessary.
  • 80. 80 GRAPHIC DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Art, A/V Technology and Communication Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. PRINTING AND IMAGING TECHNOLOGY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Art, A/V Technology and Communication Careers in printing span all aspects of the industry, including prepress, press, and finishing and bindery operations. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the printing industry with a focus on prepress and desktop publishing. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research. This course counts as a Speech graduation credit. PHOTOJOURNALISM – INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Photojournalism Students will continue to take photographs and apply what they learned in Photojournalism I. Students enrolled in this class will take photographs of school events including but not limited to sports, school events, and new events that concern the school and its students. Students will take photos for school related publications. Students will be required to attend events scheduled outside of the normal classroom day. Note: Digital camera is required for this course. ADVANCED BROADCAST JOURNALISM/ VIDEO PRODUCTION I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Journalism, Photojournalism, Advanced Speech, Advanced Technical Theater or Advanced Computer Course Students will learn the basics of video production including story types, writing in broadcast style, digital video camera techniques, basic shooting of video and basic editing. A basic understanding of audio techniques, set lighting, electronic editing, script writing, direction and special effects will be acquired. On and off camera techniques will be explored. Individual projects such as music videos, documentaries and special school and district projects will be produced. ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Advanced Journalism and Newspaper I Students write stories and plan, edit, and makeup/layout the school newspaper. These students are editors of the school newspaper.
  • 81. 81 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I Students apply techniques of layout by designing pages and by writing copy, cut lines and headlines, as well as by cropping pictures. They also sell advertisements to local merchants, gaining knowledge of the business community. Students learn to typeset copy on computers. These students are editors of the school yearbook and are responsible for cover design, theme and theme development, and the pictorial choices in the yearbook. Note: Summer hours may be necessary. ADVANCED BROADCAST JOURNALISM/ VIDEO PRODUCTION II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Advanced Broadcast Journalism/ Video Production I Students will learn the advanced methods of video production including story types, writing in broadcast style, digital video camera techniques, basic shooting of video and basic editing. A use of audio techniques, set lighting, electronic editing, script writing, direction and special effects will be acquired. On and off camera techniques will be explored. Individual projects such as music videos, documentaries and special school and district projects will be produced. Each second year student will be responsible for creating, writing, producing and editing a five minute video production. ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Advanced Journalism: Newspaper I and II These are the editors and the most experienced staff members of the school newspaper. They will plan, write, edit, and take photographs for the school newspaper. Students enrolled in this class have been a part of the staff for two years and are responsible for setting deadlines and assuring that the publication adheres to journalistic style and standards. ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I and II These are the editors and the most experienced staff members of the school yearbook. They will plan, write, edit, and take photographs for the campus yearbook. Students enrolled in this class have been a part of the staff for two years and are responsible for setting deadlines and assuring that the publication adheres to journalistic style and standards. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 82. 82 Business, Management & Administration PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None In Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance, students gain knowledge and skills in economies and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems and settings in business, marketing, and finance. BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Touch System Data Entry Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): BIM I Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create complex word-processing documents, develop sophisticated spreadsheets using charts and graphs, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate multimedia software. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. MONEY MATTERS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance Students will investigate global economics with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its impact on consumers and businesses. Students apply critical-thinking skills to analyze financial options based on current and projected economic factors. Students will gain knowledge and skills necessary to set long-term financial goals based on those options. Students will determine methods of achieving long-term financial goals through investment, tax planning, asset allocation, risk management, retirement planning, and estate planning. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students recognize, evaluate, and prepare for a rapidly evolving global business environment that requires flexibility and adaptability. Students analyze the primary functions of management and leadership, which are planning, organizing, staffing, directing or leading, and controlling. Topics will incorporate social responsibility of business and industry. Students develop a foundation in the economical, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of business to become competent managers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate management decisions. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course.
  • 83. 83 ENTREPRENEURSHIP Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. GLOBAL BUSINESS Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address global business applications of emerging technologies. Students develop a foundation in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of business to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance Students develop knowledge and skills in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of banking to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the operations, sales, and management of banking institutions to gain a complete understanding of how banks function within society. ACCOUNTING I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance Students investigate the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in the process of recording, classifying, summarizing, analyzing, and communicating accounting information. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. ACCOUNTING II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Accounting I Students continue the investigation of the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in various managerial and cost accounting activities. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. BUSINESS LAW Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students analyze the social responsibility of business and industry regarding the significant issues relating to the legal environment, business ethics, torts, contracts, negotiable financial instruments, personal property, sales, warranties, business organizations, concept of agency and employment, and real property. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of contemporary legal
  • 84. 84 issues. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions. BUSINESS ENGLISH Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): English III and Touch Systems Data Entry Students recognize, evaluate, and prepare for a rapidly evolving global business environment that requires flexibility and adaptability. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts for business reproduction. PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Touch System Data Entry and Business Management Practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Experiences occur in a paid or unpaid arrangement and a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students develop a foundation in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of business to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Education & Training INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services and Child Development Instructional Practices in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students with background knowledge of child and adolescent development as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators or trainers in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, develop materials for educational environments, assist with record keeping, and complete other responsibilities of teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel.
  • 85. 85 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services, Child Development, & Instructional Practices in Education & Training Practicum in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of child and adolescent development principles as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students in the course work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Health Science PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None The Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the health care industry. Students can earn .5 health credit for this course. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None This course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, and singular and plural forms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. HEALTH SCIENCE Credit 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Health Science and Biology The Health Science course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will have hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. The course may be taught by different methodologies such as clinical rotation and career preparation learning.
  • 86. 86 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science Students in Medical Microbiology explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases. Note: Students must also complete Pathophysiology – a successful completion of both of these courses will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirement. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science In Pathophysiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology. Note: Students must also complete Medical Microbiology – a successful completion of both of these courses will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirement. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): 3 Credits of Science In Anatomy and Physiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis. PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE I Credit 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Health Science and Biology The practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. A student may earn industry-recognized certification in this course. Fees may be required for this course. PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE II Credit 2 Grade Placement: 12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Health Science and Biology The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. A student may earn industry-recognized certification in this course. Fees may be required for this course. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities,
  • 87. 87 human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Hospitality & Tourism CULINARY ARTS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services or Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Culinary Arts begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of cooking and the science of baking and includes management and production skills and techniques. This course is offered as an internship course. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. A student may earn industry-recognized certification in this course. PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Culinary Arts The course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Practicum in Culinary Arts integrates academic and career and technical education; provides more interdisciplinary instruction; and supports strong partnerships among schools, businesses, and community institutions with the goal of preparing students with a variety of skills in a fast-changing workplace. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training plan, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio development. Practicum in Culinary Arts is relevant and rigorous, supports student application of academic standards, and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring and job shadowing. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 88. 88 Human Services PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES Credit: .5 or 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers. DOLLARS AND SENSE Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services Dollars and Sense focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the money management process, decision-making skills, impact of technology, and preparation for human services careers. Students are encouraged to participate in career and technical student organizations and other leadership organizations. CHILD DEVELOPMENT Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services This course addresses knowledge and skills related to child growth and development from prenatal through school-age children, equipping students with child development skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children and investigate careers related to the care and education of children. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. LIFETIME NUTRITION AND WELLNESS Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services or Principles of Health Science This laboratory course allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, education and training, human services, and health sciences. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services Students model the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a counseling and mental health career through simulated environments. Students are expected to apply knowledge of ethical and legal responsibilities, limitations, and the implications of their actions. Professional integrity in counseling and mental health care is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. CHILD GUIDANCE Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Human Services and Child Development This technical laboratory course addresses the knowledge and skills related to child growth and guidance equipping students to develop positive relationships with children and effective caregiver skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care, guidance, and education of children, including those with special needs. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course.
  • 89. 89 PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None Provides occupationally specific training and focuses on the development of consumer services, early childhood development and services, counseling and mental health services, and family and community services careers. Content for Practicum in Human Services is designed to meet the occupational preparation needs and interests of students and should be based upon knowledge and skills selected from two or more courses in a coherent sequence in the human services cluster as well as the essential knowledge and skills including communication, critical thinking, problem solving, information technology, ethical and legal responsibilities, leadership, teamwork, and entrepreneurship. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or though work- based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring and job shadowing. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Information Technology PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Credit: .5 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Students develop computer literacy skills to adapt to emerging technologies used in the global marketplace. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the information technology environment. DIGITAL AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Information Technology Students study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology and analyze/assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students use personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. Knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and resoning skills as applied to the information technology environment. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course.
  • 90. 90 COMPUTER SCIENCE I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Information Technology Students acquire knowledge of structured programming techniques and concepts appropriate to developing executable programs and creating appropriate documentation. Students analyze the social responsibility of business and industry regarding the significant issues relating to the environment, ethics, health, safety, and diversity in society and in the workplace as it relates to computer programming. Students should, by course’s end, be able to apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. WEB TECHNOLOGIES Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Principles of Information Technology Through the study of web technologies and design, students learn to make informed decisions and apply the decisions to the field of information technology. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. AP COMPUTER SCIENCE II (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Computer Science I and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science is designed to prepare students for the AP Computer Science A exam. The programming language used in this course is Java. Topics covered in this course include object-oriented programming, algorithmic analysis, and advanced data structures. Students will develop programs individually and in teams. Note: This course satisfies the requirement for a fourth credit of Mathematics for students graduating on the Recommended Plan who have already completed Algebra I, II, and Geometry. RESEARCH IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 2 high school information technology courses Students gain advanced knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, implementation, maintenance, evaluation, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper use of analytical skills and application of information technology concepts and standards are essential to prepare students for success in a technology-driven society. Critical thinking, information technology experience, and product development may be conducted in a classroom setting with an industry mentor, as an unpaid internship, or as career preparation. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 91. 91 Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security PRINCIPLES OF LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security introduces students to professions in law enforcement, security, corrections, and fire and emergency management services. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of police, courts, corrections, private security, and protective agencies of fire and emergency services. The course provides students with an overview of the skills necessary for careers in law enforcement, fire service, security, and corrections. Students may be awarded articulated credit upon completion of this course. LAW ENFORCEMENT I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. This course includes the role of constitutional law, the United States legal system, criminal law, law enforcement terminology, and the classification and elements of crime. Students may be awarded articulated credit upon completion of this course. LAW ENFORCEMENT II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Law Enforcement I Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. This course includes the ethical and legal responsibilities, operation of police and emergency telecommunication equipment, and courtroom testimony. Students may be awarded articulated credit upon completion of this course. COURT SYSTEMS AND PRACTICES Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Law Enforcement I Court Systems and Practices is an overview of the federal and state court systems. The course identifies the roles of judicial officers and the trial processes from pretrial to sentencing and examines the types and rules of evidence. Emphasis is placed on constitutional laws for criminal procedures such as search and seizure, stop and frisk, and interrogation. Students may be awarded articulated credit upon completion of this course. FORENSIC SCIENCE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry Recommended Prerequisite(s): Principles of Law, Public Safety Corrections, and Security; and Law Enforcement I Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science. To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in §74.3(b)(2)(C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum).
  • 92. 92 CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. NJROTC The Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) is a leadership program designed to instill in students the value of citizenship, service to the United States, personal responsibility and a sense of accomplishment. The program consists of formal classroom training, drill instruction and physical fitness training supplemented by training events, orientation visits and field trips to various facilities to enhance classroom training. NJROTC develops the self-discipline, self-confidence and leadership skills that are necessary for students to successfully meet life’s challenges. NJROTC curriculum and instructional activities are designed to develop and nurture these skills and values regardless of a student’s career path to give students a head start. NJROTC is programmed as a four year program where courses are taken sequentially with the exception of Naval Science II and Naval Science III which are offered on alternating years. Students enrolled in classes beyond Naval Science I are expected to take on leadership roles in the cadet unit. Accordingly, they must be able to set a good example for others in upholding the Navy and the Georgetown I.S.D. student code of conduct. There is no military commitment incurred or associated with participation in the program. However, students who successfully complete two or three course years of NJROTC are eligible for entry into the armed forces at up to two pay grades higher than their fellow enlistees without junior ROTC experience. Students who successfully complete the program may also compete for appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy under the NJROTC/NROTC quota. The Senior Naval Science Instructor (SNSI) is authorized to nominate a maximum of three eligible cadets each year to compete for these appointments. NJROTC Unit enrollment is open to students who: a. Are U.S. citizens or nationals, or aliens lawfully admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence. b. Are physically qualified to participate fully in the physical education program. c. Maintain acceptable standards of academic achievement and an academic standing that warrants at least normal progression leading to graduation. d. Maintain acceptable standards of conduct. e. Comply with the personal grooming standards as set forth in the NJROTC Cadet Field Manual. Standards will not be relaxed so as to reflect discredit on the naval services. Note: The NJROTC program is open to students at Georgetown High School and Georgetown East View High School. Students taking part in the program are bused to the host campus for class and, at the end of the school day, to voluntary extracurricular activities dependent on interest. Wearing of the uniform is required once a week on whichever day the student’s academic day falls. In a typical week, Monday is designated as drill days, Wednesday and Thursday are academic and uniform inspection days and Tuesday and Friday are physical fitness training days. There is no cost to the student for the uniform. However, students are expected to wear the uniform with pride and maintain it in a clean and serviceable condition. NJROTC I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): None The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the precepts of citizenship, the elements of leadership and the value of scholarship in attaining life’s goals. This course is also designed to engender a sound appreciation for the heritage and traditions of America, with recognition that the role of sea power will be important in America’s future. The course also provides instruction on military drill and ceremonies, uniform regulations, physical fitness, orienteering, principles of health, first aid and survival. All concepts are covered at a fundamental level.
  • 93. 93 NJROTC II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): NJROTC I This course builds on the general introduction provided in NJROTC I to further develop the traits of citizenship and leadership in cadets and introduce cadets to technical areas of naval science. The curriculum covers Maritime History, Nautical Sciences, Maritime Geography, Oceanography, Meteorology, Astronomy and the Physical Sciences at a fundamental level. In addition, students will have opportunities to continue to learn organizational skills, conduct physical fitness training and as appropriate lead military drill and ceremony exercises. NJROTC III Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): NJROTC I This course seeks to expand student understanding of naval science and leadership academic subjects and to broaden student understanding in the operative principles of military leadership, the concept and significance of teamwork, the intrinsic value of good order and discipline in the accomplishment of objectives. The curriculum provides ongoing instruction in Leadership, Military Justice, International Law and the Sea, National Strategy, Sea Power, Naval Operations, Naval History, Naval Intelligence, National Security, and Challenges of Future Navy Research. In addition, students will continue to learn organizational skills, conduct physical fitness training and as appropriate lead or participate in military drill and ceremony exercises. Note: NJROTC III is not available for the 2014-15 school year. Advancing NJROTC I students will take NJROTC II. Advancing NJROTC III students will take NJROTC II or NJROTC IV depending on prerequisites completed and service in leadership roles. NJROTC IV Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): NJROTC I, II, and III. Leadership: successful completion of Basic Leadership Training, Leadership Academy or satisfactory performance in a NJROTC leadership position or as a member of a NJROTC team This course is focused solely on practical leadership. The intent is to assist the senior in understanding leadership and improving their leadership skills by putting them in positions of leadership, under supervision, then helping them analyze the reasons for their varying degrees of success through the year. Classroom activities include seminars, reading assignments, classroom presentations, and practical work with younger cadets. NJROTC IV students serve as Platoon Advisors or Platoon Aides. An NJROTC IV’s foremost responsibility is to serve as a model for other cadets in everything that he or she does. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion/concurrent enrollment in college preparatory mathematics and science courses The major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3-D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion/concurrent enrollment in appropriate college preparatory mathematics and science courses This survey course exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course.
  • 94. 94 ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY (Weighted) Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Biology and Chemistry Students enrolled in this course will apply advanced academic knowledge and skills to the emerging fields of biotechnology such as agricultural, medical, regulatory, and forensics and also have the opportunity to use sophisticated laboratory equipment, perform statistical analysis, and practice quality-control techniques. Students will conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Advanced Biotechnology study a variety of topics that include structures and functions of cells, nucleic acids, proteins, and genetics. Scientific inquiry, science and social ethics and scientific systems will also be covered. Successful completion of this course will count as the fourth year of science graduation requirements. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion /concurrent enrollment in appropriate college preparatory mathematics and science courses Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as mobile phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and high-definition televisions. Students are introduced to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, engineering standards and technical documentation. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Completion/concurrent enrollment in appropriate college preparatory mathematics and science courses Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3-d design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. This course is designed for 11th or 12th grade students A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 12 Prerequisite(s): Completion/concurrent enrollment in appropriate college preparatory mathematics and science courses In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel. This course is appropriate for 12th grade students. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS I Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None Problems and Solutions I is a project-based research course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career interests, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. To attain academic success, students must have opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge, skills, and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to earn one advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program.
  • 95. 95 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS II Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Problems and Solutions I This is a continuation of the Problems and Solutions I course. Problems and Solutions II is a project-based research course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career interests, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. To attain academic success, students must have opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge, skills, and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to earn one advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics ENERGY, POWER, AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 9-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): None Energy, Power, and Transportation will allow students the opportunity to learn the knowledge and build their comprehensive skills related to the business and industry of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics, which is rapidly expanding to provide new career opportunities. Employees in this field need to understand the interaction between various vehicle systems, the logistics used to move goods and services to consumers, and the components of transportation infrastructure. Job requirements will include academic and technical skills. Students prepared to meet the expectations of employers in this industry must be able to interact and relate to others and understand the technologies used in order to provide products and services in a timely manner. The increasing demand for employees will provide growth potential. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 10-12 Prerequisite(s): None This course is designed to teach the theory of operation of aircraft airframes, power plants, and avionics systems and associated maintenance and repair practices. Aircraft services include knowledge of the function, diagnosis, and service of the electrical, electronic, hydraulic, pneumatic, airframe, mechanical, and power plant components of aircraft. Students will receive both theoretical and hands-on training in this course which will provide them a basis for completion of the ground school portion of the requirements for obtaining a Private Pilot Certificate.
  • 96. 96 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 10-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems Automotive services include knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach the theory of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. ADVANCED AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Aircraft Technology This course is designed to apply the theory of operation, repair, and maintenance of aircraft airframe, power plant, and avionics systems. Aircraft services include knowledge of the function, diagnosis, and service of the electrical, electronic, hydraulic, pneumatic, airframe, mechanical, and power plant components of aircraft. Students will be afforded the opportunity to pursue in-depth individualized studies and participate in coordinated programs and activities with outside agencies. ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Automotive Technology Automotive services include advanced knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Advanced Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach the theory of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices. A student may be awarded articulated college credit upon successful completion of this course. PRACTICUM IN TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION AND LOGISTICS Credit: 2 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): None A paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of courses in the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics cluster. Designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience such as internships, mentorships, independent study, or laboratories. CAREER PREPARATION Credit: 2-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Recommended Prerequisite(s): Students must be 16 years of age and have reliable transportation to enroll in this program. Students must maintain employment throughout the entire school year at an approved jobsite to continue in this work-based learning program. The student’s approved worksite should relate to his/her Program of Study. Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student’s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success. techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant, rigorous and supports student attainment of academic standards and effectively prepares students for college and career success.
  • 97. 97 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSES ADVANCED DESIGN/PRE-CONSTRUCTION................................78 ACCOUNTING I ................................................................................83 ACCOUNTING II................................................................................83 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION..............................................58 ADVANCED AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY .......................................96 ADVANCED ANIMAL SCIENCE .....................................................77 ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY ................................96 ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY...............................................44, 94 ADVANCED BROADCAST JOURNALISM/ VIDEO PRODUCTION I ..........................................................................80 ADVANCED BROADCAST JOURNALISM/ VIDEO PRODUCTION II.........................................................................81 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER I .................................79 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER II ................................80 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER III ...............................81 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK I ...................................79 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK II..................................81 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK III.................................81 ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE REASONING (Advanced Mathematical Decision Making)...................................................37 AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES DESIGN AND FABRICATION ....76 AGRICUTLTURAL MECHANICS AND METAL TECHNOLOGIES ......................................................................................................76 AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY ..............................................................95 ALGEBRA I.........................................................................................35 ALGEBRA I (G), (GM) (Algebra I Inclusion).....................................39 ALGEBRA I (G), (GM) DOUBLE BLOCKED (Algebra I Inclusion Double Blocked............................................................................39 ALGEBRA I DOUBLE BLOCKED ....................................................35 ALGEBRA I (M) (Basic Math I)..........................................................39 ALGEBRA I (T), (SKILLS T) ; GEOMETRY (T), (SKILLS T) ; MATH MODELS (T), (SKILLS T)..............................................40 ALGEBRA II ......................................................................................36 ALGEBRA II DOUBLE BLOCK ........................................................37 ALGEBRA II (G), (GM) DOUBLE BLOCKED (Algebra II Double Block Inclusion) ...........................................................................39 ANALYSIS OF VISUAL MEDIA.......................................................74 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY................................................44, 86 AP BIOLOGY - AP BIOLOGY LAB..................................................41 AP CALCULUS AB ............................................................................38 AP CALCULUS BC.............................................................................38 AP CHEMISTRY - AP CHEMISTRY LAB........................................42 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE.................................................................90 AP ENGLISH III .................................................................................30 AP ENGLISH IV..................................................................................30 AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE....................................................43 AP EUROPEAN HISTORY.................................................................49 AP FRENCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE IV.....................................56 AP GERMAN LANGUAGE & CULTURE IV ...................................56 AP LATIN IV ......................................................................................57 AP MACROECONOMICS .................................................................49 AP MUSIC THEORY .........................................................................71 AP PHYSICS B....................................................................................42 AP PHYSICS C....................................................................................43 AP PSYCHOLOGY .............................................................................49 AP SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE IV....................................57 AP SPANISH LITERATURE & CULTURE V...................................57 AP STATISTICS..................................................................................38 AP STUDIO ART: 2-D DESIGN.........................................................65 AP STUDIO ART: 3-DESIGN.............................................................65 AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS .................48 AP UNITED STATES HISTORY .......................................................48 AP WORLD HISTORY STUDIES...................................................... 47 AQUATIC SCIENCE .......................................................................... 43 ART I ................................................................................................... 62 ART II CERAMICS ............................................................................ 63 ART II DRAWING.............................................................................. 67 ART II PAINTING .............................................................................. 67 ART II PHOTOGRAPHY ................................................................... 63 ART II SCULPTURE .......................................................................... 67 ART III CERAMICS ........................................................................... 63 ART III DRAWING............................................................................. 63 ART III PAINTING............................................................................. 64 ART III PHOTOGRAPHY .................................................................. 64 ART III SCUPLTURE......................................................................... 64 ART IV CERAMICS ........................................................................... 64 ART IV DRAWING ............................................................................ 64 ART IV PAINTING............................................................................. 64 ART IV PHOTOGRAPHY.................................................................. 65 ART IV SCULPTURE......................................................................... 65 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY ....................................................... 96 BAND I ............................................................................................... 67 BAND II............................................................................................... 67 BAND III ............................................................................................. 67 BAND IV ............................................................................................. 68 BANKING AND FINANCE................................................................ 83 BASEBALL......................................................................................... 59 BASIC LANGUAGE SKILLS............................................................. 34 BASKETBALL (BOYS)...................................................................... 59 BASKETBALL (GIRLS)..................................................................... 59 BIOLOGY............................................................................................ 41 BIOLOGY (G), (GM) (Biology Inclusion) .......................................... 45 BIOLOGY (M) (Basic Biology) .......................................................... 46 BRIDGES (T) ...................................................................................... 53 BUSINESS ENGLISH................................................................... 31, 84 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT I .............................. 82 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT II............................. 82 BUSINESS LAW................................................................................. 83 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ........................................................... 82 CAPSTONE RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE, OR SOCIAL STUDIES ..................................................................................... 28 CAREER PREPARATION ...............................................77, 78, 81, 84, 85, 86, 87, 89, 90, 92, 95 CHEERLEADING, FRESHMEN........................................................ 59 CHEERLEADING, J.V. AND VARSITY CHEERLEADING COMPETITION SQUAD AND MASCOT ................................. 59 CHEMISTRY ...................................................................................... 41 CHEMISTRY (G, GM) (CHEMISTRY INCLUSION) ....................... 45 CHILD DEVELOPMENT ................................................................... 88 CHILD GUIDANCE............................................................................ 88 CHOIR I............................................................................................... 68 CHOIR II.............................................................................................. 68 CHOIR III ............................................................................................ 69 CHOIR IV............................................................................................ 69 CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE .................................... 94 COLLEGE READINESS AND STUDY SKILLS .............................. 33 COMMUNICATIONS (T), (SKILLS T) ............................................. 73 COMMUNITY BASED VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTION (T) .......... 52 COMPUTER SCIENCE ...................................................................... 90 COMMUNITY SKILLS (SKILLS T) I – VIII..................................... 54 COMPUTER SKILLS (T), (SKILLS T) I – IV.................................... 54 CONSTRUCTION TECH.................................................................... 78 COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH ........................................ 88 COURT SYSTEMS AND PRACTICES ............................................. 91
  • 98. 98 CREATIVE WRITING ........................................................................31 CROSS COUNTRY-FALL ONLY (GIRLS) ......................................59 CROSS COUNTRY-FALL ONLY (BOYS)........................................59 CULINARY ARTS ..............................................................................87 DAILY LIVING SKILLS (SKILLS T) I - VII.....................................54 DANCE I ............................................................................................65 DANCE II ............................................................................................66 DANCE III ...........................................................................................66 DANCE IV...........................................................................................66 DANCE I CHOREOGRAPHY ............................................................66 DANCE II CHOREOGRAPHY...........................................................66 DANCE I, II, III, IV - COLOR GUARD/ ..........................................67 DANCE I, II, III, IV - DANCE TEAM ................................................67 DEBATE I, II ......................................................................................73 DEBATE III ........................................................................................73 DEBATE IV ........................................................................................73 DIGITAL AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA ...........................................89 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS..................................................................94 DOLLARS AND SENSE.....................................................................88 EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE ........................................................43 ECONOMICS ......................................................................................49 ECONOMICS (G), (GM) (Economics Inclusion) ................................50 ECONOMICS (M) (Basic Economics) ................................................51 ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY.............75 ENERGY, POWER, AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ............95 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT............................94 ENGLISH FOR NEWCOMERS..........................................................33 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES I (ESOL) ..32 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES II (ESOL).33 ENGLISH (G); (GM) I, II, III, IV ........................................................31 ENGLISH I ..........................................................................................29 ENGLISH I (M) (Basic English I)........................................................31 ENGLISH II .........................................................................................29 ENGLISH II (M) (Basic English II).....................................................31 ENGLISH III........................................................................................30 ENGLISH III (M) (Basic English III) ..................................................32 ENGLISH IV........................................................................................30 ENGLISH IV (M) (Basic English IV)..................................................32 ENGLISH (T); (SKILLS T) I, II, III, IV ..............................................32 ENGLISH (T); (SKILLS T) V, VI, VII................................................32 ENTREPRENEURSHIP ......................................................................83 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ........................................................43 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (M) (Basic Environmental EQUINE SCIENCE..............................................................................75 FOOTBALL .........................................................................................60 FORENSIC SCIENCE ...................................................................44, 91 FOUNDATIONS OF PERSONAL FITNESS......................................55 FRENCH I............................................................................................55 FRENCH II...........................................................................................36 GEOMETRY........................................................................................37 GEOMETRY (M) (Basic Math II) .......................................................40 GEOMETRY (G), (GM) (GEOMETRY INCLUSION).......................39 GERMAN I ..........................................................................................55 GERMAN II.........................................................................................55 GLOBAL BUSINESS ..........................................................................83 GOLF (BOYS AND GIRLS) ...............................................................60 GRAPHIC DESIGN & ILLUSTRATION ..........................................80 HEALTH..............................................................................................57 HEALTH SCIENCE.............................................................................85 HORTICULTURE SCIENCE..............................................................76 HUMANITIES .....................................................................................50 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATH – ESSENTIAL STATS ............38 INSTRUCTIONAL PRAC. IN ED. AND TRG...................................84 INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV BAND ONLY ..............68 INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV ORCHESTRA ONLY..70 INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY (IPC) .............................41 INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY (G), (GM) (Integrated Physics and Chemistry Inclusion).................................................45 INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY (M) (Basic Integrated Physics and Chemistry)................................................................ 46 INTERIOR DESIGN............................................................................ 78 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN .............................. 93 IPC (T), (SKILLS T); BIOLOGY (T), (SKILLS T)............................. 46 JAZZ ENSEMBLE .............................................................................. 68 JOURNALISM .................................................................................... 79 LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND TURF GRASS MANAGEMENT....... 77 LATIN I .............................................................................................. 55 LATIN II.............................................................................................. 55 LAW ENFORCEMENT I.................................................................... 91 LAW ENFORCEMENT II................................................................... 91 LIFETIME NUTRITION AND WELLNESS ..................................... 88 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION............................................................. 75 MATH MODELS (G), (GM) (Math Models Inclusion)....................... 39 MATH MODELS (M) (Basic Math III)............................................... 40 MATH (T), (SKILLS T) IV, V, VI, VII............................................... 40 MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS.................... 36 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY...................................................... 44, 86 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY.............................................................. 85 MONEY MATTERS............................................................................ 82 MUSIC AND MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS I.................................. 70 MUSIC THEORY................................................................................ 70 NJROTC I ........................................................................................... 92 NJROTC II .......................................................................................... 93 NJROTC III.......................................................................................... 93 NJROTC IV ......................................................................................... 93 OCCUPATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS (M)...................................... 52 OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION (T) ............................................ 52 OFFICE/LIBRARY AIDE................................................................... 54 ORAL INTERPRETATION I.............................................................. 74 ORAL INTERPRETATION II, III....................................................... 74 ORCHESTRA I.................................................................................... 69 ORCHESTRA II .................................................................................. 69 ORCHESTRA III................................................................................. 70 ORCHESTRA IV................................................................................. 70 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY ................................................................. 44, 86 PE: ADVENTURE OUTDOOR ED ................................................... 58 PE: INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM SPORTS ........................................ 58 PE: INDIVIDUAL SPORTS II, III WALKING/ JOGGING .............. 58 PEER ASSISTANCE AND LEADERSHIP I & II .............................. 53 PEER TUTORING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ........... 53 PERFORMING ARTS FACILITY MGMT......................................... 73 PERSONAL & FAMILY DEV. (T), (SKILLS T) I – IV..................... 55 PERSONAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE (T), (SKILLS T)................. 58 PHOTOJOURNALISM I..................................................................... 79 PHOTOJOURNALISM INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM............................................................................. 80 PHYSICS ............................................................................................. 42 PHYSICS (G, GM) (Physics Inclusion)............................................... 45 PRACTICAL WRITING I ................................................................... 31 PRACTICUM IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES................................................................................... 77 PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ................................ 84 PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS................................................. 87 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING............................ 85 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE I............................................. 86 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE II ........................................... 86 PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES.............................................. 89 PRACTICUM IN TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION AND LOGISTICS ................................................................................. 96 PRE-AP ALGEBRA I.......................................................................... 35 PRE-AP ALGEBRA II......................................................................... 37 PRE-AP BIOLOGY............................................................................. 41 PRE-AP CHEMISTRY........................................................................ 42 PRE-AP ENGLISH I............................................................................ 29 PRE-AP ENGLISH II .......................................................................... 29 PRE-AP FRENCH II............................................................................ 56
  • 99. 99 PRE-AP FRENCH III...........................................................................56 PRE-AP GEOMETRY .........................................................................36 PRE-AP GERMAN II ..........................................................................56 PRE-AP GERMAN III .........................................................................56 PRE-AP LATIN II................................................................................56 PRE-AP LATIN III ..............................................................................56 PRE-AP PHYSICS...............................................................................42 PRE-AP PRECALCULUS ..................................................................38 PRE-AP SPANISH II...........................................................................56 PRE-AP SPANISH II FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS.........................55 PRE-AP SPANISH III..........................................................................56 PRE-AP WORLD GEOGRAPHY .......................................................47 PRECALCULUS..................................................................................37 PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS OF FLORAL DESIGN...................76 PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES...............................................................................75 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION..........78 PRINCIPLES OF ART, AV TECH, & COMM. ..................................78 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE........82 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING......................................................93 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE ...............................................85 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES..............................................88 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.........................89 PRINCIPLES OF LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY...................................................................................91 PRINTING AND IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES (Desktop Publishing)....................................................................................80 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS I ......................................................94 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS II.....................................................95 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS (CommunicatioApplications) .......................................................80 PSYCHOLOGY ...................................................................................49 READING I..........................................................................................33 READING II, III ..................................................................................33 READING I, II, III FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL READING).......................................................................34 RECREATION & LEISURE SKILLS (T), (SKILLS T) I – V.............54 RESEARCH IN IT SOLUTIONS .......................................................90 90 SAT/ACT PREPARATION ................................................................53 SCIENCE (T) III, IV, V .......................................................................46 SOCCER (BOYS) ................................................................................60 SOCCER (GIRLS) ..............................................................................60 SOCIAL SKILLS (M)..........................................................................54 50 SOCIOLOGY ......................................................................................49 SOFTBALL..........................................................................................60 SPANISH I ..........................................................................................55 SPANISH II ......................................................................................55 SPANISH III ......................................................................................56 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES – SOCIAL ISSUES .........48 SPORTS MEDICINE I.........................................................................60 SPORTS MEDICINE II .......................................................................61 SWIMMING ........................................................................................61 TECHNICAL THEATRE I..................................................................72 TECHNICAL THEATRE II.................................................................72 TECHNICAL THEATRE III ...............................................................72 TECHNICAL THEATRE IV ...............................................................72 TEEN LEADERSHIP...........................................................................53 TENNIS................................................................................................61
  • 100. 100 THEATRE I .........................................................................................71 THEATRE II .......................................................................................71 THEATRE III ......................................................................................71 THEATRE IV ......................................................................................71 THEATRE PRODUCTION .................................................................71 TRACK – (GIRLS) ..............................................................................61 TRACK- (BOYS).................................................................................61 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT...................................................48 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (G), (GM) (United States Government Inclusion).................................................................50 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (M) (Basic United States Government ..................................................................................51 UNITED STATES HISTORY .............................................................48 UNITED STATES HISTORY (G), (GM) United States History Inclusion)......................................................................................50 UNITED STATES HISTORY (M) (Basic United States History).......51 VETERINARY MEDICAL APPLICATIONS .................................... 77 VOCAL ENSEMBLE I, II, III, IV CHOIR ONLY.............................. 69 VOCATIONAL EXPERIENCE (M) ................................................... 52 VOLLEYBALL (GIRLS) ................................................................... 61 WEB TECHNOLOGIES .................................................................... 90 WILDLIFE, FISHERIES AND ECOLOGY MANAGEMENT .......... 76 WORLD GEOGRAPHY...................................................................... 47 WORLD GEOGRAPHY (G), (GM) (World Geography Inclusion) .... 50 WORLD GEOGRAPHY (M) (Basic World Geography) .................... 51 WORLD GEOGRAPHY (T), (SKILLS T); WORLD HISTORY (T), (SKILLS T); U.S. HISTORY (T), (SKILLS T); U.S. GOVT (T) (SKILLS T); ECONOMICS (T); (SKILLS T) ............................. 52 WORLD HISTORY ............................................................................ 47 WORLD HISTORY (G), (GM) (World History Inclusion) ................. 50 WORLD HISTORY (M) (Basic World History) ................................. 51 WRESTLING (BOYS) ........................................................................ 61 Appendix A: Advanced Courses That Receive Weighted Grade Points The following courses receive weighted grade points as described in Section V: Grade Point Average and Class Rank of the course guide. English  Pre-AP English I  Pre-AP English II  AP English III  AP English IV  ACC Composition I  ACC Composition II  ACC American Literature  ACC British Literature  GT Capstone Research in English (Independent Study in English, Journalism, or Speech)  Other college English courses* Mathematics  Pre-AP Algebra I  Pre-AP Geometry  Pre-AP Algebra II  Pre-AP Precalculus  AP Calculus AB  AP Calculus BC  AP Statistics  AP Computer Science  GT Independent Study in Mathematics  College mathematics courses* Science  Pre-AP Biology  Pre-AP Chemistry  Pre-AP Physics I  AP Biology  AP Chemistry  AP Physics B  AP Physics C  AP Environmental Science  Anatomy & Physiology  Advanced Biotechnology  GT Capstone Research in Science (Scientific Research & Design)  College science courses* Social Studies  Pre-AP World Geography  Pre-AP World History Studies  AP World History Studies  AP U.S. History  AP U.S. Government & Politics  AP Economics  AP Macroeconomics  AP European History  AP Psychology  ACC U.S. History  ACC Government  ACC Economics  GT Capstone Research in Social Studies (Social Studies Advanced Studies)  Other college social studies courses* Languages Other Than English (LOTE)  Pre-AP Spanish II  Pre-AP Spanish III  AP Spanish IV, Language  AP Spanish V, Literature  Pre-AP French II  Pre-AP French III  AP French IV  Pre-AP German II  Pre-AP German III  AP German IV  Pre-AP Latin II  Pre-AP Latin III  AP Latin IV  College LOTE courses* Explanations: ACC = Austin Community College *Equivalent college courses to those listed are allowed as well as courses that count as the 4th or higher credit in English, mathematics, science, social studies, or languages other than English.
  • 101. 101 Appendix B Georgetown Independent School District Planning for the Future… High School Graduate Requirements for Texas and GISD Graduation Programs For Ninth Grade Classes of 2013-14 and Prior Recommended High School Program English ...........................................................................4 Credits English I, II, III, IV Mathematics ..................................................................4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, & one additional math course (See math course sequence flowchart.) Science ...........................................................................4 Credits (See science flowchart.) Social Studies .................................................................4 Credits World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government/ Economics Foreign Language..........................................................2 Credits Must consist of two credits of the same language. Physical Education.........................................................1 Credit Limit 4 Credits. Can substitute: Marching Band (Fall), Cheerleading (Fall), Drill Team (Fall), JROTC, Athletics or District-approved appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus Comm App..................................................................... .5 Credit Professional Communications is a course that satisfies this requirement. Fine Arts.........................................................................1 Credit Electives..........................................................................7.5 Credits (.5 Health is a locally required State credit*) *.5 Principles of Health Science may be substituted for the required .5 Health locally required State credit Advanced Measures.......................................................NONE Recommended High School Program (28 Credits) Distinguished Achievement Program English ....................................................................... 4 Credits English I, II, III, IV Mathematics ............................................................. 4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, & one additional math course (See math course sequence flowchart.) Science........................................................................ 4 Credits Biology, Chemistry, Physics & one additional science course (See science course sequence flowchart.) Social Studies............................................................. 4 Credits World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government/ Economics Foreign Language...................................................... 3 Credits Must consist of three credits of the same language. Physical Education.................................................... 1 Credit Limit 4 Credits. Can substitute: Marching Band (Fall), Cheerleading (Fall), Drill Team (Fall), JROTC, Athletics or District-approved appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus Comm App................................................................. .5 Credit Professional Communications is a course that satisfies this requirement. Fine Arts .................................................................... 1 Credit Electives ..................................................................... 6.5 Credits (.5 Health is a locally requiredState credit*) *.5 Principles of Health Science may be substituted for the required .5 Health locally required State credit Advanced Measures .................................................. FOUR See Additional Requirements in Counseling Office or this course catalog. Distinguished Achievement Program (28 Credits) GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS I. Students in GISD must complete a minimum of 28 credits at East View High School/ Georgetown High School and 26 credits at Richarte High School to receive a high school diploma. All credits must be completed in grades 9-12, except high school courses satisfactorily completed in grades 7 and/or 8. The Texas Education Agency requires 26 credits. All courses used to meet State graduation requirements must be selected from State Board of Education (SBOE)-approved courses, with the exception of some elective credits which may be locally approved. II. All courses in this catalog are State Board-approved unless noted as Local Credit Only. Locally developed electives (Local Credit Only) have been designed to meet an identified GISD need or interest. In grades 9-12, a student must complete all graduation requirements and pass the State required exit level exams before he/she is awarded a diploma. III. It is the student and parent’s responsibility to see that the requirements for graduation from high school are met. If you have any question about courses, registration, State-required exit level exams or other graduation requirements, contact the campus guidance department. IV. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college, students who are college-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate college entrance requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. V. Since employers have varying needs and requirements, students who are career-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and strive to meet future employment requirements by selecting an appropriate graduation plan.