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Performance based planning in a nut shell (V5)
 

Performance based planning in a nut shell (V5)

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Step by step activtiies to increase the probability of success for all projects, no matter the project domain. These principles and practices can be found in all successful projects.

Step by step activtiies to increase the probability of success for all projects, no matter the project domain. These principles and practices can be found in all successful projects.

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    Performance based planning in a nut shell (V5) Performance based planning in a nut shell (V5) Presentation Transcript

    • V5.0 Performance-Based Project Management® In A Nutshell Principles, Practices, and Processes that Increase Your Probability of Project Success Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012
    • Why Performance-Based Project Management®?  All successful projects must deliver capabilities:  Not the work efforts,  Not the cost expenditures,  Not the documentation, test results, or the processes. Performance-Based Project Management® Principles, Practices, and Processes for Increasing the Probability of Project Success† † Program Success Probability, John Higbee, Defense Acquisition University, 9 May 2005 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012  All successful projects must deliver tangible beneficial outcomes, measured in units meaningful to the decision makers. 2/29
    • 5 Principles of Project Success . . . 1. What Does DONE Look Like? 2. What is the path to DONE? 3. Do We Have Enough Time, Resources, And Money To Get To DONE? 4. What Impediments Will We Encounter Along The Way To DONE? 5. How Do We Know We Are Making Progress Toward DONE? 5 Immutable Principles of Project Management, Copyright ©, Glen B. Alleman, 2012 3/29
    • Identify Needed Capabilities Indentify Baseline Requirements Establish Performance Measurement Baseline Execute Performance Measurement Baseline Perform Continuous Risk Management (CRM)  Define Capabilities  Define ConOps  Assess Needs, Cost, and Risk Impacts  Define Balanced and Feasible Alternatives  Decompose Scope  Assign Accountability  Arrange Work  Develop BCWS  Assign Performance Define the Measurable Capabilities of each Project Outcome 4  Fact Finding  Gather And Classify  Evaluate And Rationalize  Prioritize Requirements  Integrate And Validate Assure All Requirements Provided In Support of Capabilities Define Measures of Performance and Effectiveness Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012  Perform Work  Accumulate Performance Measures  Analyze Performance  Take Corrective Action Ensure Cost, Schedule, and Technical Performance Compliance
    • Define the Work Breakdown Structure(WBS).  Identify the Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS).  Integrate the WBS and OBS.  Schedule the work.  Identify the Products and Milestones.  Set the time phased budget.  Record direct costs. Performance Analysis  Determine variances.  Sum Data and variances.  Manage action plans.   Incorporate Changes. † These 11 processes are a subset of the 32 Criteria of ANSI–748B Earned Value Management. While not all projects can make use ANSI EVM, these process are the basis of all project management success. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 5/29
    • 6 Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science
    • Principles and Practices of Performance-Based Project Management ® 5 Practices 5 Principles Identify Capabilities What does ConOps, SOO, done look like? SOW What is the path to Done? What resource do we need along the way? Integrated Master Plan (IMP) What impediments will we encounter along the way? 4 Levels of Uncertainty Assessment How do we measure progress? Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) Define Requirements Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) Execute the PMB Continuous Risk Management Technical and Operational Based Plan Incremental Maturity Assessment Physical Percent Complete Risk Identification Iterative and Incremental Delivery Risk Analysis Future Performance Forecasting Risk Planning Risk adjusted Performance Measurement Baseline Risk Tracking Earned Value Management Risk Control Work Breakdown Structure Resource Management Plan Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) Technical and Risk adjustments Programmatic to cost and Risks assigned schedule to all WBS measures deliverables Measures of Performance (MoP) Technical Performance Measures
    • Practices and Processes of Performance-Based Project Management ® 5 Processes Organize 5 Practices Identify Capabilities Plan, Schedule, Budget Project mission, Value stream of vision, and increasing deliverables maturity Define Requirements Resource Management Plan Analyze Variances Top level budget for capabilities Measures of Effectiveness Requirements traced to capabilities Performance Measurement Baseline Account for all costs Measures of Performance Work Packages with budget Labor and material costs Technical Performance Measures Baseline change request Budgeted Cost Work Package Physical Percent Technical for Work Performance Complete change requests Scheduled Execute the PMB Continuous Risk Management Manage Change Risk Register Risk impacts on cost and schedule Risk adjustments to PMB
    • Performance-Based Project Management® Addresses The Critical Project Outcomes† The Situation  By their very nature, project are risky.  Successful project management is risk management.  Program management must be about avoiding surprises. The Problem  Traditional program management assumes technical and program processes drive outcomes.  Focusing on process alone has failed in the past. The Need  Program management is about avoiding surprises.  Measures of physical percent complete are mandatory. The Context  Organizations execute projects.  Adapting the organization culture to the project paradigm increases the probability of success. The Solution  Technical Performance of deliverables is a measure of increasing probability of success.  Earned Value Management reveals surprises. † Project Management Case Study, Pierre Bonnal, CNAM IIM MBA Program, June 2004 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 9/29
    • Practices produce Project Outcomes  The Outcome does not need to be the end product.  The Outcome is the result of Work Packages that increase the measureable maturity of the product or service. Outcomes incrementally increase a capability’s maturity  Outcomes are specified and measureable.  Design complete and verifiable.  Development complete and testable.  Testing complete and validated.  Installation and deployment complete and operational. Outcomes result from “units of work” – the Work Package  Work Packages consume time and resources.  Work Packages are owned by a single accountable person.  Work Packages produce outcomes. Project Management Case Study, Pierre Bonnal, CNAM IIM MBA Program, June 2004 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 10/29
    • Five Practices Of Performance-Based Project Management®  What capabilities are needed to fulfill the project goal, mission, or outcome? Identify Needed Capabilities  Establish Requirements Baseline  Establish the Performance Measurement Baseline  Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline  Perform Continuous Risk Management Define the set of capabilities needed to achieve the project objectives or the particular end state for a specific scenario. Using the Concept of Operations (ConOps), define the details of who, where, and how this capability is to be accomplished, employed, and executed. What technical & operational requirements are needed to produce the capabilities? Define the technical and operational requirements for the system capabilities to be fulfilled. First, define these requirements in terms isolated from any implementation details. Only then bind the requirements with technology. What is the schedule to deliver products or services to produce the requirements? Build a time–phased network of work activities describing the work to be performed, the budgeted cost for this work, the organizational elements that produce the outcomes, and the Performance measures showing this work is proceeding according to plan. What are the periodic measures of physical percent complete? Execute work activities, while assuring all Performance assessment represent 100% completion before proceeding. This means – No rework, no forward transfer of activities to the future. Assure all requirements are traceable to work & all work is traceable to requirements. What are the impediments to success and how are they being handled? Apply the processes of Continuous Risk Management for each Performance Based Management(sm) process area to: Identify, Analyze, Plan, Track, Control, and Communicate projectmatic and technical risk. 11/29
    •  Identify Needed Capabilities Define the capabilities needed to achieve the desired objectives or a particular end state for a specific scenario. Define the details of who, where, and how these capabilities are to be accomplished, employed, and executed. What capabilities are needed to fulfill the Business Case or project Mission? 1.1 Define Capabilities as Operational Concepts Define Capabilities through Scenarios or Use Cases  Partition system capabilities into classes of service within operational scenarios.  Connect the capabilities to system requirements using some visual modeling notation.  Define Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) and Measures of Performance (MoP).  Define the delivery schedule for each measure of Performance and effectiveness. 1.2  Define scenarios for each system capability.  Connect these scenarios to a Value Stream Map of the increasing maturity of the project.  Assess value flow through the map for each needed capability.  Identify capability mismatches and make corrections to improve overall value flow. 1.3  Assign costs to each system element using a value flow model.  Assure risk, probabilistic cost and benefit Performance attributes are defined.  Use cost, schedule and technical Performance probabilistic models to forecast potential risks to project performance. Assess Needs, Costs, and Risks of the Capability Simultaneously 1.4 Define Explicit, Balanced, and Feasible Alternatives  Make tradeoffs that connect cost, schedule, and technical Performance in a single location that compares the tradeoffs and their impacts.  Use Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) and Measures of Performance (MoP) for these alternative tradeoffs. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 12/29
    •  What Does A Capability “Sound” Like?  We need the capability to pre‒process insurance claims at $0.07 per transaction rather than the current $0.11 per transaction.  We need the capability to remove 1½ hours from the retail ordering process once the merger is complete.  We need the capability to change the Wide Field Camera and the internal nickel hydride batteries, while doing no harm to the telescope.  We need the capability to fly 4 astronauts to the International Space Station, dock, stay 6 months, and return safely.  We need the capability to control the Hell Fire Missile with a new touch panel while maintaining existing navigation and guidance capabilities in the helicopter.  We need the capability to comply with FAR Part 15 using the current ERP system and its supporting work processes. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 13/29
    •  Establish Technical and Operational Requirements Baseline 2.1 Perform Fact Finding 2.2 Gather and Classify Requirements 2.3 Evaluate and Rationalize Requirements 2.4 Prioritize Requirements 2.5 Integrate and Validate Requirements Define the technical and operational requirements that must be present for the system capabilities to be delivered. Define these requirements in terms isolated from any technology or implementation. Assure each requirement is connected to a need system capability. What Technical and Operational Requirements are Needed to Produce the Capabilities?  Produce an overall statement of the customer need in the operational context.  Develop the overall operational and technical objectives of the system that meets the need.  Defined the boundaries and interfaces of the system.  Gather required system capabilities, functional, nonfunctional and environmental requirements, and design constraints.  Build the Top Down capabilities and functional decomposition of the requirements in a Requirements Management System.  Answer the question “why do I need this?” in terms of operational capabilities.  Build a cost / benefit model using probabilistic assessment of all variables, their dependencies, and impacts.  For all requirements, perform a risk assessment to cost and schedule.  Determine criticality for the functions of the system.  Determine trade off relationships for all requirements to be used when option decisions must be made.  For all technical items, prioritize their cost and dependency.  Address the completeness of requirements by removing all “TBD” items.  Validate that the requirements are traceable to system capabilities, goals, and mission.  Resolve any requirements inconsistencies and conflicts. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 14/29
    •  What Is a Requirement? A Requirement is …”A statement identifying a capability, a physical characteristic, or a quality factor that bounds a product or process need for which a solution will be pursued.” — IEEE Standard 1220–2005 The hardest single part of building a system is deciding what to build … ... No other part of the work so cripples the resulting system if done wrong. No other part is more difficult to rectify later. – Fred Brooks “No Silver Bullet,” 1987 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 15/29
    •  Establish Performance Measurement Baseline 3.1 Decompose Scope into Work Packages Build a time–phased network of activities describing the work to be performed, the budgeted cost for this work, the organizational elements that produce the outcomes from this work, and the Performance measures showing this work is proceeding according to plan. A Baselined Schedule that Produces the Products or Services that Meet The Requirements Decompose the outcomes into a product based Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), then further into Work Packages that produce these outcomes all traceable to the requirements, and to the needed capabilities. 3.2 Assign responsibility to Work Packages (the groupings of outcomes) to a named owner, accountable for the management of the resource allocations, cost and schedule baseline, and technical delivery of all element in the Work Breakdown Structure. 3.3 Arrange the Work Packages in a logical network with defined outcomes, milestones, internal and external dependencies, with credible schedule, cost, and technical Performance margins. 3.4 Develop the Time–Phased Budgeted Cost for Work Scheduled (BCWS) for the labor and material costs in each Work Package and the Project as a whole. Assure proper resource allocations can be met and budget profiles match expectations of the project sponsor Assign Responsibility for outcomes Arrange Work Packages in Logical Order Develop BCWS for Work Packages 3.5 Assign WP Measures of Performance Assign objective Measures of Performance (MoP) and Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) for each Work Package and summarize these for the Project as a whole. 3.6 Set Performance Measurement Baseline Establish a Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) used to forecast the Work Package and Project ongoing and completion cost and schedule Performance metrics. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 16/29
    •  What Does a Credible Plan and Schedule Look Like?  The Plan is the strategy to successfully complete the project, described through Significant Accomplishments and their Accomplishment Criteria.  The Schedule is the sequence of the work activities measured by the Accomplishment Criteria, that follow the Plan of the Significant Accomplishments.  A credible Plan and Schedule means there is a statistical model of cost, schedule, and technical Performance of outcomes as the foundation of the credibility of the project’s probability of success. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 17/29
    •  Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline Execute the planned work, assuring all work is 100% complete before proceeding to the next planned work package. No rework, no forward transfer of activities or features. Assure every requirement is traceable to work and all work is traceable to requirements. How long are you willing to wait before you find out you’re late? 4.1  Using the Work Package sequencing, release work to be performed as planned.  With the responsibility assignments, identify the accountable delivery manager to guide the development of the products or services for each Work Package. 4.2 Accumulate  Using Physical Percent Complete or Apportioned Milestones, capture measures of progress to plan for each Work Package.  Report this Physical Percent Complete in a centralized database for each Work Package and the project as a whole. Perform the Authorized Work and Report Work Package Performance 4.3 Analyze Work Package Performance 4.4 Take Corrective Management Action 4.5 Maintain the Performance Baseline  Compare the Physical Percent Complete against the Planned Percent Complete for each period of performance.  Construct cost and schedule Performance indices from this information and the Physical Percent complete measures.  With Cost and Schedule Performance indices, construct a forecast of future Performance of cost, schedule, and technical Performance compliance.  Take management actions for any Work Packages not performing as planned.  Record past Performance based on Work Package completion criteria.  Record past future forecast Performance estimates in a historical database.  Forecast next future Performance estimate against the Performance Measurement Baseline.  Report this next future Performance estimate to the project stakeholders. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 18/29
    •  How Do We Know We Are Achieving Our Planned Progress?  The Only measure of progress is the assessment of physical percent complete.  This measurement Must be in units meaningful to the customer.  These units can be:     Planned capabilities, Planned capacities, Planned features and functions, Planned quantities.  Done is evidenced by the production of outcomes, on the planned date, for the planned cost, with the planned technical performance. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 19/29
    •  Apply Continuous Risk Management at Every Step 5.1 Identify Risks 5.2 Analyze Risks 5.3 Plan Risk Response 5.4 Track the Risk Management Activities 5.5 Control or Accept the Risks Continuous Risk Management starts the underlying principles, concepts, and functions of risk management and provides guidance on how to implement risk management as a continuous practice in projects and the organizations that management projects. What are the impediments to success and what are their mitigations?  Identify and classify risks in a Risk Register.  Manage this Risk Register through a Risk Management Board.  Connect these risks and their handling in the Master Schedule.  Convert risk data into risk decision‒making information.  Use this analysis information as the decision basis for the project manager to work on the “right” risks.  Turn risk information into decisions and actions (both present and future).  Develop actions to address individual risks, prioritize risk actions, and create an integrated risk management plan.  Monitor the status of risks and actions taken to ameliorate risks.  Identify and monitor risks to enable the evaluation of the status of risks themselves and of risk mitigation plans.  Risk communication lies at the center of the model to emphasize both its pervasiveness and its criticality.  Without effective communication, no risk management approach can be viable. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 20/29
    •  Continuous Risk Management† For Each Risk… Subproject and partner data/constraints, hazard analysis, FMEA, FTA, etc. Risk data: test data, expert opinion, hazard analysis, FMEA, FTA, lessons learned, technical analysis Resources Replan Mitigation Identify Identify Risks, Issues, and Concerns Analyze Risk classification, Likelihood Consequence, Timeframe Risk prioritization Evaluate, classify, and prioritize risks Plan Decide what should be done about each risk Program/project data (metrics information) Statement of risk Tr a c k Research, Watch (tracking requirements) Acceptance Rationale, Mitigation Plans Risk status reports on: Risks Risk Mitigation Plans Monitor risk metrics and verify/validate mitigations Control Close or Accept Risks Invoke contingency plans Continue to track Make risk decisions † Continuous Risk Management, Audrey J. Dorofee, Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 1996 21/29
    • How is Performance-Based Project Management® different from traditional approaches to project management?  All work activities are traceable to and from the needed business or mission capabilities†.  All activities are focused on Outcomes rather than Output.  Performance is measured as Physical Percent Complete, not the consumption of resources and the passage of time.  All planning and measurement is risk adjusted.  Performance-Based Project Management ® never confuses effort with results – the customer only bought results. † A Metric Framework for Capability Definition, Engineering and Management, Seventeenth Annual International Symposium of the International Council On Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 24 - 28 July 2007 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 22/29
    • How is Performance-Based Project Management® the same as traditional approaches to project management?  Founding principles based on US DoD program management processes, PMBOK®, and Agile project management methods.  Planning assures incremental progress measured in units meaningful to the buyer.  All project participants integrated with each activity providing full visibility into progress to plan.  Continuous risk management embedded in each detailed process step. Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012 23/29
    • 1. Identify Needed Systems Capabilities – Define the Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) for each Capability D E F I N E O P E R A T IONA L C O N C E P TS T H R O U GH S C EN ARIOS O R U S E C A S E S Partition system capabilities into classes of service within operational scenarios Connect capabilities to system requirements using sysML Define Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) for these capabilities in units meaningful to the customer Define in the master schedule the achievement of measure of Technical Performance D E F I N E C A PA B I L I TIES N E EDED T O I M PL EMENT T H E O PE RATION AL C O N C E PTS Define scenarios for each system capability Connect these scenarios to the Value Stream map Assess value flow through the map for each needed capability Identify capability mismatches and make corrections to improve overall value flow A S S E SS N E EDS , C O S T , A N D R I S K S I M U L TANEOUSLY Assign costs to each system element using a value process model Assure risk, probabilistic cost and benefit performance attributes are defined Use cost, schedule, and technical performance probabilistic models to forecast potential risks to project performance D E F I N E E X P L I C I T , B A L A N CED , A N D F E A S IBLE A L T E RN ATIVES Make tradeoffs that connect cost, schedule, and technical performance in a single “trade space” model Measures of Effectiveness and Measures of Performance are the raw materials for these tradeoffs 2. Establish Requirements Baseline – Define Measures Of Performance (MoP) for each requirement delivering a Capability P E R FORM F A C T F I N D I N G Produce an overall statement of the problem in the operational context Develop the overall operational and technical; objectives of the target system through Measures of Performance (MoP) for the requirements Define the boundaries and interfaces of the target system G A T H E R A N D C L A S S IFY THE R EQUI REMENTS Gather required operational capabilities, functional, nonfunctional, and environment requirements and design constraints Build a Top Down Capabilities and Functional decomposition of the requirements in a flow down tree using a requirements tool E V A L U A TE A ND R A T I ONALI ZE T H E R E Q UI REMENTS Answer the question “why do we need this?” in terms of operational benefits Build a cost / benefit model using probabilistic assessments of all variables and dependencies For technical requirements, perform a risk assessment to the cost and schedule P R I O RITIZE T H E R E Q U IREMEN TS Determine the criticality for the functions for the system’s mission Determine tradeoff relations for all requirements to be used when option decision are made For technical items, prioritize the cost and dependencies I N T E G R ATE A N D V A L I D ATE T H E R E Q U IREMEN TS Address completeness of requirements by removing all TBD items Validate the requirements agree and are traceable to capabilities, goals, and the mission Resolve any requirement inconsistencies and conflicts 24 Performance-Base Project Management (sm) Chapter I
    • 3. Establish Performance Measurement Ba seline – Define Technical Performance Measures (TPM) D E C O M POSE R E Q U IREMENTS I N T O W ORK P A CKA GES A N D P L A N N IN G P A C K A G ES Decompose the project scope into a product based Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Decompose the WBS into Work Packages describing the production of all outcomes and processes traceable to the requirements A S S I G N A C C O U NTA BILITY F O R T H E O U T C OME F R OM E A C H W O R K P A C K A G E Assign accountability for Work Packages to a named owner for the management of resource allocation, cost baseline, and technical delivery ARRANGE WORK PACKAGES IN A LOGICAL ORDER Arrange Work Packages in a network with defined outcomes, milestones, internal and external dependencies, appropriate schedule and cost margin D E V E L OP T H E B U D G ETED C O ST F O R W O R K S C H E D ULED (BCWS) F O R E A C H W O R K P A C K A G E A N D P L A N N ING P A C K A GE Develop a time‒phased Budgeted Cost for Work Scheduled (BCWS) for labor and material costs in each Work Package Develop a time‒phased Budgeted Cost for Work Scheduled (BCWS) for the project as a whole Assure proper resource allocations can be met and budget profiles match expectations of the project sponsor A S S I G N W O R K P A C K A G E M E A S U RES O F P E R F ORMA NCE (M O P), K E Y P E R FORMAN CE P A R A METERS (KPP), A N D T E C H N I CAL P E R F ORMA NCE M E A S U RES (TPM) Assign an objective Measure of Performance (MoP) for each critical Work Package outcomes Trace critical outcomes to the Measure of Effectiveness (MoE) defined in the Capabilities baseline Summarize these Measures of Performance (MoP) and Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) for the project as a whole Assign measures of Physical Percent Complete for each Work Package Assign measures of Physical Percent Complete for the program as a whole S E T T H E P ERFORMA NCE M E A S U REMENT B A S E LINE (PMB) Establish a Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) used to forecast Work Package and Project ongoing and completion cost and schedule metrics 4. Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) – Maintain Cost, Schedule, and Technical Performance PER FORM A U T H ORI ZED W O R K I N T H E P L A N N ED S E Q U ENCE Using the Work Package sequencing, release work to be performed as planned With the RACI based RAM, the Accountable delivery manager guides the development of the products or service for each Work Package A C C U M ULATE A N D R E P O RT W ORK P A CKA GE P H Y S I CAL P E R FORMAN CE Using Physical Percent complete or Apportioned Milestones, capture the measures of “progress to plan” for each Work Package Report the Physical Percent Complete in a centralized system for each Work Package and he program as a whole A N A L Y ZE W O R K P A C K A G E P E R FORMAN CE Compare the Actual Percent Complete against the Planned Percent Complete for each period of performance Construct cost and schedule performance indices from this information and the Physical Percent Complete measures T A K E C O R R E CTIV E M A N A G E MEN T A C T I ON FOR A N Y V A R I A NCE I N W O R K P A C K A GE P E R FORMAN CE With the cost and schedule performance indices, construct a forecast of future performance of cost, schedule, and technical performance compliance Take management actions for any Work Packages not performing as planned M A I N T A IN P ERFORMANCE M E ASU REMENT B A S E LINE ’ S I N T E G R ITY Record past performance based on Work Package completion criteria Record previous future performance estimates in a historical database Forecast future performance against the Performance Measurement Baseline Report the future performance estimate to the program stakeholders 25 Performance-Base Project Management (sm) Chapter I
    • 5 Principles of Project Success What does done look like? How do we get there? Are there enough resources? What are progress impediments? How do we measure progress? Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012
    • 5 Practices Needed to Implement the 5 Principles Identify Capabilities in units of measure meaningful to the customer Identify Technical & Operational Requirements to deliver capabilities Establish risk adjusted Technical, Cost, and Schedule Baseline. Execute baseline with measurements of physical percent complete Apply Continuous Risk Management 27 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012
    • 5 Processes Needed the Implement the 5 Practices Guided by the 5 Principles Organize the deliverables and staff doing the work Plan, Budget, and Schedule in the Performance Measurement baseline Account for direct and indirect costs against planned costs Analyze performance for cost, schedule, and technical variance Manage revisions to Performance Measurement Baseline 28 Performance Based Management(sm), Copyright ® Glen B. Alleman, 2012
    • Glen B. Alleman, Copyright © 2012 29/29