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311 Ch16
 

311 Ch16

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    311 Ch16 311 Ch16 Presentation Transcript

      • VIII.) Deflection of Beams
      • A.) Reasons to Consider Deflections
    • B.) Assumptions in Deflection Formulas 1.) Stress does not exceed Proportional Limit 2.) Beam Material is: a.) Homogeneous b.) Has Linear Stress-Strain Curve c.) Modulus of Elasticity is same in Tension and Compression 3.) Plane sections remain plane
    • B.) Assumptions in Deflection Formulas 4.) Beam has a vertical plane of Symmetry and Loads and Reactions act in this plane, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the beam.
    • B.) Assumptions in Deflection Formulas 5.) Deflections are relatively small, and the length of the elastic curve (deformed beam) is the same as the length of its horizontal projection.
    • B.) Assumptions in Deflection Formulas 6.) Deflection due to shear is very small therefore negligible.
    • C.) Using Diagrams & Formulas to Compute Deflections (Appendix H of Text) W = Total Load (kips,N) w = Distributed Load (kips/in,N/m) I = Moment of Inertia (in 4 ,m 4 ) l = Span Length (in,m) x = Distance from left support to location you wish to compute deflection. a & b are defined by the diagram.