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The Mole

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An inquiry-based, thought experiment to guide individuals to attain the concept of the "mole" in chemistry and how to use it in basic calculations.

An inquiry-based, thought experiment to guide individuals to attain the concept of the "mole" in chemistry and how to use it in basic calculations.

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Transcript

  • 1. The Mole Chemistry
  • 2. First Something Familiar What do the following items have in common?
  • 3.  
  • 4. What common traits did you notice?
  • 5. Look at these next photos and see if any would belong in the same category as the last set of photos Think about whether or not they have the same traits as you found to be common in the last set
  • 6.  
  • 7. Hopefully, you found that none of the photos represent a dozen Thus, they are NOT like the preceding photos that depicted “dozen”
  • 8. Now, Something Not Familiar What do the following items have in common? Use your note-taking template to list some common traits for the examples you see
  • 9. 32 grams of Sulfur Examples of the Mole
  • 10. What common traits did you notice?
  • 11. Take a Look at the Following Examples There will be columns, just like on your note sheet, that have positive and negative examples List common traits you see in the positive examples and find reasons why the negative examples are unlike the positive ones
  • 12. Examples of the Mole
    • Positive Examples
    • 12g of Carbon
    • 16g of Oxygen
    • 1g of Hydrogen
    • 44g of CO 2
    • 18g of H 2 O
    • 6.02 x 10 23 atoms of Carbon, Hydrogen or Oxygen
    • Negative Examples
    • 12amu of Carbon
    • 16amu of Oxygen
    • 1amu of Hydrogen
    • 44amu of CO 2
    • 18amu of H 2 O
    (g) = gram (amu) = atomic mass unit 1 amu is equal to 1.6611x10 -24 grams ( very small amount of a gram)
  • 13. Let’s share some ideas aloud…
  • 14. Definition of the Mole
    • Using your common traits from the positive examples and your “lack of” common traits from the negative attributes, create a working definition of the Mole
  • 15. Now, Take a Look at these Examples Like the last set, find traits that are similar and unlike between the groups Look for attributes that may not have appeared in the last set and compare to your working definition
  • 16. More Examples of the Mole
    • Positive Examples
    • 6.02 x 10 23 atoms of Nitrogen
    • 6.02 x 10 23 molecules of Water
    • 6.02 x 10 23 atoms of Carbon
    • Negative Examples
    • 1 atom of Nitrogen
    • 1 molecule of Water
    • 1 atom of Carbon
    (g) = gram (amu) = atomic mass unit 1 amu is equal to 1.6611x10 -24 grams ( very small amount of a gram)
  • 17. Definition of the Mole
    • Did you find anything in the last slide that was different or new?
    • Did the common traits found in those examples of the mole match your definition?
    • Did you have to change your definition at all?
  • 18.  
  • 19. Definition of the Mole If your common attributes led you to a working definition that looks something like this, you’ve got the concept!!
    • A mole is a number—it is a constant—a mole will always equal 6.02 x 10 23
    • It relates the mass of a single atom in amu to the mass in grams
  • 20.
      • Avogadro was a scientist who discovered that there was a special relationship between mass of an atom in amu to its mass in grams
      • This relationship is that the mass of an atom or molecule in grams contains exactly 6.02 x 10 23 particles—no matter the kind of particle; thus, the quantity was defined and named after him.
      • This number is important in chemistry, but it is a mouthful to say all the time.
      • So, we have a term, the mole, which is defined as Avogadro’s number, or 6.02 x 10 23 , of any substance
  • 21. I’m here to tell you all about moles! What they mean, how to use them and how to calculate them. Check out my diagram below, then we’ll discuss more in detail. Mr. Mole Moles Number of Particles Mass X X X X
  • 22. Let’s Try Some Problems Involving Moles
  • 23.
    • Critical Thinking Questions
    • According to the periodic table, a single carbon atom has a mass of 12.011 amu.
    • How many carbon atoms does it take to equal 12.011 grams?
    • According to the periodic table, a single carbon atom has a mass of 12.011 amu.
    • How many carbon atoms does it take to equal 12.011 grams?
    • According to the periodic table, a single Oxygen atom has a mass of 15.999amu. How many oxygen atoms does it take to equal 15.999 grams?
    • Compare your answers to questions 1, 2 and 3.
  • 24.
    • Critical Thinking Questions
    • According to the periodic table, a single carbon atom has a mass of 12.011 amu.
    • How many carbon atoms does it take to equal 12.011 grams?
    • 6.02x10 23 atoms (1 mole)
    • According to the periodic table, a single carbon atom has a mass of 12.011 amu.
    • How many carbon atoms does it take to equal 12.011 grams?
    • 6.02x10 23 atoms (1 mole)
    • According to the periodic table, a single Oxygen atom has a mass of 15.999amu. How many oxygen atoms does it take to equal 15.999 grams?
    • 6.02x10 23 atoms (1 mole)
    • Compare your answers to questions 1, 2 and 3.
    • They are all equal to 6.02x10 23 atoms (1 mole)
  • 25. Now that you’ve got down the mole concept and you’ve seen it in action, let’s to the independent practice! Rock ON
  • 26.
    • If I have 1 mol of carbon, how many atoms do I have?
    • If I have 1 mol of water, how many molecules do I have?
    • If I have 1 mol of Ca 2+ ions, how many ions do I have?
    Let’s check and make sure you’re getting this “mole” thing down. Mr. Mole
    • If I have 1 mol of salt, how many formula units of salt do I have?
    • If I have 1 mol of donuts, how many donuts do I have?
    • If I have 6.02x10 23 M&M’s, how much candy do I have?
    • If I have 6.02x10 23 French fries, how much potato do I have?
    • If I have 6.02x10 23 molecules of carbon monoxide, how much CO do I have?
  • 27. Rock n’ Mole
    • A mole is a unit, or have you heard,
    • Containing six times ten to the twenty-third,
    • That's a six with twenty-three zero's at the end,
    • Much too big a number to comprehend.