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  • 1. E-mail to teach writing in the ESL classroom Name: Matrix: Maher Vann Singh PEH080024 Mohd Nizam Bin Salahudin PEH080033 Nur Izyan Nadiah Binti Azman PEH080054 Siti Farezza Binti Abd Muis PEH080065 Vanessa Tan Yi Yen PEH080072Lecturer: Puan Foziah Mahmood
  • 2. INTRODUCTION Research shows that by using ICT in ESL learning is then transformed from a traditional passive- listening process to an experience of discovery, exploration, and excitement.
  • 3. OVERVIEW Summary: ICTs forPart A Education E-mail to teachPart B writing in ESL classroomPart C Lesson Plan
  • 4. PART A -SUMMARY The article entitled ICT for Education by Wadi D. Haddad is about the potential and conditions of an effective use of ICTs for education and learning. Wadi disucssess many aspects such as challenges facing decision makers, the question of ICTS, the potential of ICTS, the effectiveness of ICTS, and integrating technology into education.
  • 5. PART A -SUMMARY Firstly, the challenges that have significant implications for education development. For the national challenges, the problem occurred when technologies are not well spread equally to every country and this cause digital divide problem. Secondly, there are three types of technologies such as instrument technologies, instructional technologies, and dissemination technologies
  • 6. PART A -SUMMARY Thirdly, Wadi also explains about the practicality and the potential of ICT to reach large audience includes a few mechanisms such as radio, television, and virtual high schools and universities.
  • 7. PART A -SUMMARY The use of ICTs teaching resources for educators in classroom will enhance the learning process as they motivate and engage students. Moreover, ICTs are sources that can sustain lifelong learning, in which they are flexible, can be used on demand where the information and skills will be always updated to suit the needs of the increasing sophistication of modern societies and also provide just- in-time education
  • 8. PART B- E-MAIL TO TEACH WRITING IN ESL CLASSROOM Students engage in the act of writing in every single day in their personal and private lives. Instant messaging, blogging, posting comments on MySpace and Facebook, emailing, and text messaging are types of writing that only occurs in 21st century era.
  • 9. PART B- E-MAIL TO TEACH WRITING IN ESL CLASSROOM Belisle (1996): “A further advantage is that sometimes more writing is actually accomplished when using e-mail. Electronic blips on the screen are perceived to be more changeable, more ephemeral, and less indelible than traditional pen and pencil writing…”
  • 10. PART B- E-MAIL TO TEACH WRITING IN ESL CLASSROOM Patrikis (1995), e-mail allows communication between students in a context where the teachers role is no longer at the center. ESL learners can experience increased control over their own learning, since they can choose the topic and change the direction of the discussion. The end goal is to communicate with another person in the target language rather than to produce a mistake-free composition.
  • 11. PART B- E-MAIL TO TEACH WRITING IN ESL CLASSROOM Gonglewski, Meloni and Brant (2001), “…e-mail extends what one can do in the classroom, since it provides a venue for meeting and communicating in the foreign language outside of class. Because of the nature of e-mail, learners do not have to be in a specific classroom at a particular time of day in order to communicate with others in the foreign language.”
  • 12. PART C-LESSON PLAN Subject: English Date: 19th April 2012 Class: 6 Ambitious Enrolment: 40 pupils Time: 12.25 – 1.25 p.m. Duration: 60 minutes Proficiency: Average to high proficiency Theme: World of Knowledge Topic: Writing e-mails Focused Skill: Writing Integrated Skill: Listening, Speaking, Reading Intended Learning Outcome: 4.8 – Give accurate information when writing messages, instructions, simple reports, and when filling out forms.
  • 13.  Curriculum Specifications: 4.8.1 – Write a message for a purposeBehavioural Objectives: By the end of the lesson,pupils should be able to:i) Classify the dos and don’ts of writing an e-mailinto the table given in pairsii) Write a simple e-mail draft to the tourist informationof the country choseniii) Send the e-mail to the respective addresses usingtheir own e-mailsLanguage Focus: Vocabulary related to letter writingPrevious Knowledge: Pupils are familiar with theusage of e-mails to send messages.
  • 14. Stages/Time Content Teaching/Learning Rationale Remarks ActivitiesSet Examples of 1) Teacher asks pupils To activate Whole classInduction expected about the places or relevant participation answers: countries they schemata(± 5min) would like to visit. Singapore 2) Teacher asks pupils America if they have visited To arouse any of the places or pupils’ Spain countries mentioned interest before. 3) Teacher asks pupils if they have written To lead in e-mails before and to the topic takes note of pupils’ responses. To lower pupils’ affective filter
  • 15. Pre- Examples of 1) Teacher separates To introduce Pair workwriting expected pupils into pairs. pupils to the answers: 2) Teacher asks pupils if dos and(± they think that there don’ts of e- Teaching15min) E-mails are are any rules when mail writing aids used: the same as writing e-mails. table letters 3) As guidance, teacher (please We should relates e-mail writing to To prepare refer to not use short letter writing and asks them for the Appendix 1) forms pupils to compare and writing contrast. activity We should 4) Teacher places a table always start (please refer to with a Appendix 1) on the To ensure greeting board with an example that pupils of the dos and don’ts understand of writing an e-mail. that there is 5) Teacher gives some a structure time to pairs to think that needs to about any other dos be used and don’ts that can be when writing put in the table. e-mails 6) Teacher facilitates by walking around the class to answer any queries pupils have. 7) After about 5 minutes, teacher selects pairs to come to the front to fill in the table. 8) Teacher goes through the table with the class and discusses if the table has been filled up
  • 16. Writing E-mails 1) Teacher tells pupils to To let pupils Pair work written by imagine that they are apply the rules(± 20min) pupils interested to travel to a of e-mail foreign country and writing they Teaching want to find out more have learned aids used: information about the earlier example of place. an e-mail To provide 2) Teacher asks pairs to (please practice for decide on a country. refer to writing 3) Teacher tells pupils to Appendix 2) write a simple draft e- mail about the To allow questions they have teacher to about the place they asses pupils’ want to go to. understanding 4) Teacher shows pupils of writing e- an example of a mails using a correct e-mail (please structure refer to Appendix 2). 5) Teacher reminds pupils that they should To get pupils follow the dos and ready for the don’ts about writing e- activity in the mails discussed post-writing earlier. stage 6) Teacher facilitates by walking around the room and giving assistance wherever necessary. 7) When pupils are finished, teacher asks pairs to swap their e- mails and check if their
  • 17. Post- Pupils’ 1) Teacher tells pupils that To expose Pair workWriting finished e- they are now going to pupils to how mails send the e-mails to the an e-mail(± 15min) respective tourist works information centres. 2) Teacher allows pupils to look for the e-mails of the To give tourist information pupils centres online. experience in 3) Teacher facilitates by sending an e- assisting wherever mail needed. 4) Pupils send their e-mails. To enhance their social skills
  • 18. Closure Examples of 1) Teacher asks pupils To recap Whole class expected if the e-mail is an the lesson discussion(± 5min) answers: important tool for communication and E-mail is a very why. To important tool of 2) Teacher takes note reinforce communication. of pupils’ responses. learning It is fast and easy to use. Everyone uses it to communicate with each other.
  • 19. Appendix 1 The dos and don’t’s of writing an e-mail Dos Don’ts Use an informative subject line,  Write ‘hello’ as your subject line.  Write about irrelevant issues. The which says what the email is about. reader will soon hit ‘delete’ if the Write the most important information first. e-mail doesn’t get to the point. Use numbers and bullet points to  Give personal information that you make the message clearer. don’t want anyone else to know. Use simple grammar. Avoid things (The email could end up in the like the passive. (As emails are a wrong hands)fast means of communication, they  Use capital letters to write wholetend to be less wordy and complex words as in emails, this is than formal letters.) considered shouting. Write short sentences.  Use different fonts in the email (the Use paragraphs to keep the email clear and easy to understand recipient’s computer may not be compatible)  Use Italics (the reason may be misunderstood, due to cultural differences).  Use exclamation marks.  Use abbreviations like coz and uni, as the recipient may not understand them.
  • 20. Appendix 2Good e-mail modelDear Mr Jones,I’m a university student from Finland and I’m writing to get some information about yourlanguage courses this summer. I’ve got a few questions: 1. Do you do a course for university students, which helps them with their essay writing skills? 2. How many hours a week are the courses? 3. What sort of accommodation do you offer? 4. What after-school activities are there? 5. Do you do any trips to other towns in the UK?I’m hoping to come over in June, so if you can get back to me as soon as possible, itwould be great. Thanks for your help.Best regards,Jaana Nikkinen
  • 21. CONCLUSION In conclusion, ICT’s consequently affect education system. There are many tools of ICT that can be used in teaching in ESL classroom, for instance e-mail. E-mail is an effective tool to teach writing in ESL classroom. There are many benefits of using e-mail and ultimately it gives new experience for learners.
  • 22. REFERENCESBelisle., R.(1996). E-mail activities in the esl writing class. Access on 13 April 2012 from http://iteslj.org/Articles/Belisle-Email.html.Gonglewski, M. (1999). Linking the internet to the national standards for foreign language learning. Foreign Language Annals, 32(3), 348-362.Krashen, S. & Terrell, T.D. (1983). Krashens Comprehension Hypothesis Model of L2 learning-The natural approach, Pergamon.Moran, C., & Hawisher, G. (1998). The rhetorics and languages of electronic mail. In I. Snyder, (Ed.), Page to screen. Taking literacy into the electronic era (pp.80- 101). London: Routledge.
  • 23. REFERENCESMargaret Gonglewski, Christine Meloni and Jocelyne Brant. ICT as tool in ESL classroom.The George Washington University (Washington DC, USA). Patrikis (1995), Patrikis, P. (1995). Where is computer technology taking us. ADFL Bulletin, 26, 2: 36- 39.Warschauer, M., Shetzer, H. & Meloni, C. (2000). Internet for english teaching. Alexandria, VA: TESOL Publications.Gonglewski., M, Meloni., C & Brant., J (2001). Using e-mail in foreign language teaching: rationale and suggestions. Access on 14 April 2012 from http://iteslj.org/Techniques/MeloniEmail.html.Wadi D. Haddad (2012). ICTs for Education A Reference Handbook Part 1: Decision Makers Essentials. Access on 12 April 2012 from http://www.ictinedtoolkit.org/usere/pdfs/ICTs_for_Education_Essen

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