Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Investing in Myanmar 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Investing in Myanmar 2013

1,111
views

Published on

Brief document about the investment environment in Myanmar. Multi-industry overview as of March 2013

Brief document about the investment environment in Myanmar. Multi-industry overview as of March 2013

Published in: Business, Travel

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,111
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
114
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.           An  overview  of  Myanmar’s  investment   environment                                                                             Fadi  Haddad   March  2013   fyhaddad@gmail.com      
  • 2. Myanmar:  investment  and  political  background    Myanmar,  formerly  known  as  Burma,  is  a  country  in  Southeast  Asia  bordering  Bangladesh,  India,  China,  Laos  and  Thailand.  It  has  a  population  of  68  million,  among  the  largest  in  the  region  and  of  a  similar  size  to  Thailand.  The  country  has  a  range  untapped  natural  resources  sought  after  by  foreign  investors  such  as  oil,  natural  gas,  construction  materials,  gems,  metals,  textile,  wood  products  and  agriculture.    For  the  past  50  years,  Myanmar  was  ruled  by  a  military  government,  which  caused  most  Western  countries,  and  notably  the  USA,  to  implement  sanctions  against  it  and  isolate  Myanmar  from  the  rest  of  the  world.  In  2010,  the  situation  changed  with  the  new  president  U  Thein  Sein’s  decision  to  open  the  country  and  put  an  end  to  the  military  rule  –  a  decision  that  has  been  welcomed  by  the  United  States  with  both  President  Obama  and  Hilary  Clinton  visiting  Myanmar  in  2012.  Since  then,  investors  from  all  over  the  world  are  entering  the  country,  mainly  from  China,  Japan,  Thailand  and  Malaysia.      The  country  still  struggles  with  a  poor  human  rights  record,  conflict  zones  and  heavy  corruption.  The  military,  although  officially  out  of  the  current  government,  is  still  very  much  involved  in  the  politics  as  well  as  in  the  economy,  running  some  of  the  largest  holding  companies  in  the  country  such  as  the  Union  of  Myanmar  Economic  Holdings  (UMEHL).    This  is  to  be  expected,  as  the  country  is  still  in  the  very  early  stages  of  democratisation  and  the  situation  will  likely  normalise  over  time.  What  the  investor  should  focus  on  is  the  great  potential  of  Myanmar  and  its  advantages:  large  population,  cheap  labor  (about  80  USD  per  month  –  although  largely  unskilled),  numerous  natural  resources,  shared  borders  with  China  and  India,  an  extensive  sea  access,  aging  industries  waiting  to  be  refurbished  and  an  enormous  tourism  potential.      Myanmar  is  part  of  the  Association  of  South  East  Asian  Nations  (ASEAN),  a  free  trade  agreement  between  all  of  the  Southeast  Asian  nations  promoting  trade  and  tourism  in  the  region.  Myanmar  will  be  a  full  active  member  soon  and  will  host  next  year’s  ASEAN  summit  for  the  first  time.      The  major  attraction  in  Myanmar,  besides  its  countless  temples  and  pagodas,  is  its  under-­‐developed,  almost  virgin  economy.  Myanmar  lags  behind  in  almost  every  essential  industry:  banking,  telecoms,  retail,  tourism  and  construction.    Banking  The  financial  industry  is  among  the  most  rudimentary  and  archaic  in  the  country.  There  are  22  banks  in  Myanmar:  3  are  government  owned,  2  are  military  owned  and  the  rest  are  privately  owned.  Only  a  handful  has  computers,  as  electronic  payments  are  not  yet  common.  Every  bank  has  a  Western  Union  office  for  transfers  and  credit  card  services  have  only  been  available  in  two  banks  –  CB  Bank  and  KBZ  –  since  December  2012.  This  doesn’t  seem  to  bother  the  local  population,  as  less  then  10%  currently  own  a  bank  account.    
  • 3.  Foreign  banks  are  naturally  trying  to  get  in  to  the  market,  but  just  as  in  China  25  years  ago,  the  government  is  restricting  this  move  and  foreign  banks  can  only  have  representative  offices  in  Myanmar.  In  a  few  years,  the  government  will  allow  them  to  make  basic  financial  operations,  such  as  forex  and  only  when  the  local  banks  are  brought  up  to  international  standards  will  the  market  be  totally  liberalised.  There  have  been  some  reports  of  the  government  authorizing  joint  ventures  in  the  banking  industry  between  foreign  and  local  entities.      Telecoms  The  other  industry  currently  struggling,  although  making  rapid  progress,  is  the  telecom.  The  number  of  cellphone  holders  is  second  to  last  worldwide  after  North  Korea  –  a  pre-­‐pay  SIM  card  costs  over  150  USD  and  the  “one-­‐time-­‐use”  SIM  card  costs  20  USD  –  leaving  this  industry  seriously  underserved  and  an  opportunity  for  international  providers.  Internet  is  among  the  most  expensive  in  the  world:  installation  cost  for  the  wiring  and  router  ranges  between  500  and  900  USD  with  a  monthly  fee  ranging  between  50  and  100  USD,  depending  on  the  speed.      On  the  plus  side,  3G  technology  has  been  introduced  recently  and  rumour  suggests  that  the  price  of  the  pre-­‐pay  SIM  cards  will  fall  to  10  USD  at  the  end  of  April.  Myanmar  is  catching  up  in  this  field,  as  in  Yangon  many  people  already  own  the  latest  Samsung  or  iPhone  and  small  telecom  shops  have  invaded  the  city’s  main  shopping  streets.    Retail  The  retail  industry  is  going  to  grow  very  big,  very  fast  –  Myanmar’s  68  million  strong  market  is  a  big  incentive  for  foreign  investors.  International  brands  such  as  Bata,  Lacoste,  Converse  and  Nivea  have  started  to  flood  the  market,  charming  local  consumers  who  have  been  seeing  the  same  products  on  their  shelves  for  the  past  50  years.  Though  it  is  still  unclear  what  is  actually  in  Myanmar  and  what  is  “legally”  imported  from  Thailand.  Nevertheless,  even  though  the  population  is  still  mostly  poor  with  one  of  the  lowest,  if  not  the  lowest,  purchasing  power  of  Southeast  Asia,  the  new  and  encouraging  economic  reforms  should  create  a  large  middle  class  eager  to  spend.      An  important  indicator  reflecting  the  successful  economic  reforms  is  car  ownership.  It  has  significantly  increased  and  for  the  first  time  in  the  history  of  Yangon,  there  are  traffic  jams.  This  has  been  made  possible  due  to  the  cheap  imports  of  used  cars  from  Japan  and  the  drastic  reduction  on  import  duties.      Tourism  Tourism  is  one  of  the  most  important  industries  in  Myanmar  as  it  brings  in  direct  foreign  capital,  something  that  the  other  industries  are  taking  more  time  to  do.  The  country  has  temples  and  beaches  that  can  rival  Thailand  and  Cambodia’s  once  the  infrastructure  is  properly  established.    Tourism  is  increasing  on  average  20%  year-­‐on-­‐year  with  over  1  million  tourists  in  2012  and  more  are  expected  to  come  in  2013.  Myanmar’s  perceived  
  • 4. ‘authenticity’  is  attracting  tourists  from  all  over  the  world.  This  is  a  relatively  small  figure  compared  to  Thailand’s  20  million  yearly  tourists  but  may  also  be  an  indication  of  what  to  expect  in  the  future.  Moreover,  Myanmar  will  host  the  27th  South  East  Asian  Games  in  December  of  2013  in  Nay  Pi  Taw  (the  new  capital),  Mandalay  (the  second  largest  city)  and  Yangon.  Unfortunately,  the  hotel  industry  is  highly  unprepared  for  this  surge  of  tourists,  athletes  and  journalists.        There  are  currently  8’000  hotel  rooms  in  Yangon  (compared  to  42’000  rooms  in  Bangkok)  and  28’000  throughout  the  country.  Building  hotels  is  one  of  the  main  drivers  of  the  ongoing  works  in  Myanmar,  as  over  300  hotels  are  estimated  to  be  under  construction  today.  The  number  of  rooms  in  Yangon  is  expected  to  increase  by  37%  per  year  by  2016  mainly  driven  by  big  international  hotel  chains  from  across  the  globe.      This  shortage  has  pushed  hotel  room  rates  up  350%  in  5  years  and  prices  are  expected  to  increase  a  further  25%  in  2013.  This  doesn’t  seem  to  bother  tourists  whose  number  increased  54%  in  2012  alone,  many  of  whom  are  sleeping  in  the  temples  as  hotel  occupancy  is  100%  in  the  dry  season.  This  situation  is  expected  to  continue  for  the  next  5  to  10  years,  as  there  are  fewer  than  2’000  rooms  in  Yangon  that  meet  international  standards.      Construction  and  public  infrastructure  This  construction  boom  is  not  only  limited  to  hotels  but  extends  to  everything  else  in  both  the  private  and  the  public  sector.    In  the  private  sector  the  demand  for  office  and  residential  buildings  as  well  as  malls  is  increasing.  There  is  about  the  same  office  space  in  all  of  Yangon  than  in  one  60-­‐story  building  in  Bangkok.  The  set  up  of  small  shared  and  serviced  offices  by  westerners  is  on  the  rise  and  provides  a  good  short  term  solution,  though  for  a  more  sustainable  answer,  the  government  is  looking  for  investors  to  start  building  Yangon  Business  Center.  This  project  will  combine  high-­‐rise  office  buildings  and  malls  in  the  township  of  Insein  –  north  of  downtown  Yangon.    The  influx  of  expats  and  “returnees”  (wealthy  Burmese  migrants  returning  to  Myanmar)  as  well  as  the  growing  upper-­‐middle  class  are  driving  the  demand  for  new  residential  buildings  and  condominiums  with  international  standards.  A  short  drive  around  Yangon  is  enough  to  witness  the  ongoing  construction,  mainly  in  downtown  area.      On  the  other  hand,  the  public  sector  has  a  lot  more  investments  to  do.  One  of  the  downsides  of  doing  business  in  Myanmar  is  the  very  poor  infrastructure,  notably  the  lack  of  electricity  and  the  very  old  road  network.  Much  of  the  infrastructure  still  dates  from  the  British  era,  which  ended  in  1948,  and  has  only  marginally  evolved  since  then.    For  that  reason,  the  government  has  started  making  investments  in  heavy  infrastructure,  such  as  dams  to  provide  electricity  to  the  70%  of  the  population  estimated  to  be  unplugged,  and  in  roads  and  bridges.  The  Asian  Development  Bank,  the  IMF  and  the  World  Bank  promised  loans  to  the  government  for  up  to  
  • 5. 900  million  USD;  that  is  excluding  the  18  billion  USD  in  loans,  aid  and  debt  forgiveness  from  Japan  over  3  years,  200  million  USD  from  the  EU  on  a  two-­‐year  programme  and  about  20  million  USD  from  the  Australian  government.    For  other  projects  such  as  new  airports,  ports  and  free  economic  zones  around  the  country,  the  government  is  eagerly  looking  for  foreign  partners  interested  in  doing  private-­‐public  partnerships.      The  three  notable  projects  today  are  the:     1) The  Thilawa  port  project:  the  current  Yangon  port  is  located  in  downtown   area  right  off  Strand  road,  a  main  street  in  the  center  of  Yangon.   Unfortunately,  the  port  cannot  be  extended  to  cope  with  increasing  traffic   as  the  city  is  quite  literally  behind  it.  For  that  reason,  the  government  is   developing  the  Thilawa  port  30km  south  of  the  city  and  creating  a  2’400   hectare  free  economic  zone  around  it  for  a  total  of  12.6  billion  USD.  The   project  was  started  the  late  1990s,  but  was  the  victim  of  poor  timing  and   changes  in  government  policy.  The  terminal  opened  in  1998  just  at  the   start  of  the  Asian  financial  crisis,  and  the  combination  of  the  crisis  and   sanctions  reduced  both  freight  traffic  and  any  interest  by  foreign   investors  in  building  facilities  in  the  Thilawa  free  trade  zone.       2) The  Dawei  deep-­‐sea  port  project  is  probably  the  biggest  project  in   Myanmar.  Estimated  at  $80  billion  dollars,  which  also  happens  to  be  the   figure  of  Myanmar’s  entire  GDP,  this  port  –  if  and  when  completed  –  is   expected  to  compete  with  Singapore’s.  The  small  town  of  Dawei  is  located   southeast  of  Yangon  and  is  only  about  280km  away  from  Bangkok,  which   is  the  main  driver  for  this  project.  The  plan  is  to  create  a  shorter  route  for   the  ships  going  to  Thailand  and  avoid  transiting  through  Singapore,  which   would  save  time  and  money.  On  top  of  serving  Myanmar’s  population  it   would  open  the  door  to  a  70  million  people  market  in  Thailand  as  well  as   in  the  surrounding  countries  such  as  Laos  and  Cambodia.  The  port  will  be   developed  along  with  the  Thai  government  but  the  details  for  the   partnership  and  the  financing  remain  unclear  at  the  moment.   Additionally,  the  government  has  decided  to  create  a  Free  Economic  Zone   around  the  Dawei  port  –  similar  to  the  one  in  Aqaba,  Jordan  –  and   encourage  the  development  of  a  big  industrial  city.       3) The  new  Yangon  International  Airport  will  be  built  in  the  region  of  Bago,   about  80Km  north  of  Yangon.  The  government  is  still  looking  for  a   private-­‐public  partnership  and  big  bidders  such  as  the  Zurich  Airport  are   trying  to  be  part  of  the  project.  This  new  airport  will  have  a  capacity  of  7   million  passengers  (compared  to  2.7  million  for  the  current  airport)  and   should  be  completed  in  December  2016.    However,  the  cement  industry  in  Myanmar  is  very  rudimentary  and  cannot  cope  with  all  these  projects.  Ten  of  the  14  existing  cement  plants  are  still  owned  by  the  government  producing  roughly  2.7  million  tons  a  year.  These  factories  are  old,  inefficient  and  still  using  old  methods  to  produce  low  quality  cement.    
  • 6.         The  current  market  demand  being  estimated  at  about  6  million  tons  a  year  forces   the  country  to  import  from  Thailand,  Indonesia  and  India  to  fill  the  gap.        For  that  reason,  and  according  to  the  website  of  the  Department  of  Investment   and  Company  Administration  (DICA),  the  construction  industry  falls  under  the   “hot  investments”  category.  That  means  that  the  government  wants  to   significantly  reduce  the  portion  of  imports  and  promote  local  production  as  well   as  exports  of  Myanmar  cement.  The  government  said  that  it  would  hand  out  10   permits  to  allow  cement  plants,  four  of  which  have  already  been  approved  in  the   past  year  for  an  additional  quantity  of  1.9  million  tons  a  year.    The  cement  consumption  is  expected  to  grow  10  to  20%  per  annum  for  the  next   5  to  10  years  and  is  estimated  to  peak  at  20  million  tons.  Many  analysts  compare   the  Myanmar  market  to  Thailand’s  20  years  ago  and  expect  a  similar  growth  rate   considering  that  both  countries  roughly  have  the  same  population  and  land  size.                                                                      
  • 7. Foreign  Direct  Investment  law:    Myanmar  just  emerged  from  50  years  of  isolation  where  foreign  investment  was  not  considered  in  any  way.  The  government  is  doing  its  best  to  adapt  to  the  surge  of  foreign  investors  but  the  corruption  and  the  lack  of  talent  in  the  public  sector  make  it  a  rather  difficult  task.      Today  Myanmar  has  an  FDI  Law,  FDI  Rule  and  an  FDI  Notification  all  of  which  cover  similar  ground  and  yet  are  somewhat  different.  There  are  no  specific  processes  to  follow  in  the  creation  of  a  company  and  most  things  seem  to  happen  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis.      What  is  certain  is  the  following:     -­‐ In  order  to  set  up  an  industrial  company/factory,  one  needs  to  have  a   local  partner  for  a  joint  venture.  Terms  of  the  JV  will  be  set  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐ case  basis  but  it  is  legal  for  the  foreigner  to  own  the  majority  of  the   shares.   -­‐ For  a  services  company,  a  foreigner  does  not  need  any  local  partner.   -­‐ One  needs  to  apply  for  a  permit  at  the  DICA  and  at  the  relevant  ministry.   -­‐ The  working  capital  for  a  factory  is  of  500’000  USD,  50%  of  which  should   be  deposited  on  the  DICA  account  before  the  project’s  approval  to  show   the  authorities  the  investor’s  seriousness.   -­‐ For  a  services  company,  the  working  capital  is  of  50’000  USD.   -­‐ There  is  a  2’500  USD  registration  fee  –  non-­‐refundable  in  case  the   government  rejects  the  project.   -­‐ There  is  a  5  year  tax  break  on  any  factory  in  Myanmar.   -­‐ There  is  a  one  year  duty  free  on  raw  material  imports.     -­‐ Corporate  /  income  tax  is  of  25%.    It  is  important  to  note  that  not  only  are  the  Burmese  culturally  a  very  laid  back  society,  but  50  years  of  autocratic  rule  has  shaped  the  current  generation  into  “taking  things  slowly”.  Most  people  seem  content  with  the  current  situation,  which  is  relatively  much  better  than  just  two  years  ago,  and  many  don’t  seem  in  a  hurry  to  do  business,  which  complicates  things  since  a  local  partner  is  sometimes  mandatory  to  set  up  a  business.        Myanmar  and  especially  Yangon  area  have  several  Special  Economic  Zones  as  an  incentive  to  investors.  The  SEZ  law  is  still  under  revision  but  what  is  certain  is  that  the  tax  breaks  in  these  areas  is  of  8  years  under  the  new  drafted  law.  The  new  law  should  be  published  next  year.    Another  important  point  to  consider  when  investing  in  Myanmar  is  taking  the  money  out  of  the  country.  Getting  money  into  the  country  is  easy  and  in  the  case  of  Myanmar  one  does  it  through  one  of  the  government  banks:  Myanmar  Investment  and  Commercial  Bank  (MICB)  or  the  Myanmar  Foreign  Trade  Bank  (MFTB).  When  it  comes  to  taking  the  gains  out  of  the  country,  one  has  to  get  approval  from  the  Central  Bank  first  and  then  the  transfer  will  be  done  through  
  • 8. one  of  these  banks  to  the  foreign  entity.  However,  so  far,  there  have  been  no  major  cases  where  the  Central  Bank  refused  a  transfer.              
  • 9. The  challenges:    Many  significant  challenges  surround  the  investment  environment  in  Myanmar  today,  especially  when  setting  up  a  factory  or  any  other  big  investment.    First  of  all,  the  poor  infrastructure  is  the  main  obstacle  to  setting  up  a  business.  Electricity  is  scarce  and  roads  are  bad,  which  means  that  there  will  be  extra  costs  in  investing  in  generators  and  in  proper  transportation.    Apart  from  government  bureaucracy  and  corruption,  perhaps  the  biggest  challenge  is  land  prices.  The  surge  of  foreign  investors,  not  only  looking  at  the  untapped  potential  of  a  68  million  people  market  but  at  the  very  cheap  labor  cost,  are  all  surprised  when  they  see  the  land  prices.  Cost  of  land  in  industrial  zones  as  well  as  the  special  economic  zones  are  reaching  absurd  levels.  There  is  no  official  pricing  but  a  figure  seems  to  be  repeatedly  used:  200’000  USD  per  acre  for  a  land  with  no  access  to  electricity  and  most  likely  no  or  bad  road  access.      The  real  estate  prices  in  Yangon  are  also  extremely  high.  Small  shops  in  the  city  are  about  2’000  or  3’000  USD  a  month  and  decent  apartment  rentals  are  quite  often  above  2’000  USD  a  month  for  very  low  quality  housing.        The  final  and  most  unstable  challenge  is  the  political  situation.  Two  years  ago,  after  the  massacre  of  several  hundreds  of  monks  by  the  army  in  central  Yangon  (official  figure  states  less  than  10  deaths),  the  military  government  had  to  gradually  step  down  in  a  very  Buddhist  Myanmar,  leading  to  the  situation  we  are  at  today.  Many  of  the  current  government  ministers  are  ex-­‐military  officials  but  the  president  seems  to  be  reliable,  and  his  popularity  is  constantly  increasing,  competing  with  the  famous  Aung  San  Suu  Kyi.      The  ongoing  conflict  between  the  Burmese  army  and  the  Kachin  Independence  Army  in  the  north  of  the  country  by  the  Chinese  border  threatens  the  country’s  stability.  There  are  also  occasional  clashes  with  the  Muslims  at  the  Bangladeshi  border,  on  the  southern  Thai  border  and  in  the  center  of  the  country  just  recently  in  March  2013.    Investors  should    closely  monitor  the  lead  up  to  the  next  general  election  in  2015.  Aung  San  Suu  Kyi  wants  to  run  against  the  current  president  and  both  parties  have  a  significant  pool  of  supporters  susceptible  to  create  chaos.                        
  • 10. Why  should  you  invest:    Despite  the  poor  infrastructure,  the  corruption,  the  incomplete  FDI  law  and  the  political  situation,  investing  in  Myanmar  is  still  a  wise  decision.    Investors  shouldn’t  expect  Myanmar  to  operate  like  western  economies,  or  even  the  rapidly  developing  economies  of  Asia  and  should  take  these  challenges  into  account  when  making  decisions.  The  country  is  still  at  the  very  early  stages  of  opening  up  and  the  investors  should  not  underestimate  the  cultural  shock  and  the  slow  responsiveness  of  a  population  that  has  been  isolated  and  controlled  for  the  past  50  years.    Investing  in  Myanmar  today  is  quite  an  aggressive  move  and  should  not  exceed  10  to  15%  of  the  overall  portfolio  exposure  to  emerging  markets.  Getting  involved  in  this  thriving  frontier  market  from  early  on  could  give  the  investor  exponential  growth  over  the  next  10  years.  Unlike  poor  Cambodia  and  Laos,  Myanmar  is  rich  in  natural  resources  and  will  most  likely  follow  the  steps  of  Thailand  and  Malaysia  instead.    Asset  management  is  impossible  in  Myanmar,  as  the  stock  market  is  still  under  construction,  hence  the  only  way  to  gain  exposure  is  through  private  equity  deals  across  all  industries.  The  country  is  still  very  poor  and  basic  services,  such  as  electricity,  are  still  a  luxury.  Yangon,  the  most  populous  and  developed  part  of  the  country,  still  lacks  proper  infrastructure  and  essential  amenities,  a  favourable  situation  paving  the  way  to  countless  investment  opportunities  and  new  ventures.    Being  part  of  the  big  investments  in  Myanmar,  such  as  the  Dawei  port  project  or  the  new  airport,  is  challenging  as  one  needs  to  be  very  well  connected  or  at  least  benefit  from  a  sovereign  support  to  gain  credibility.  Setting  up  a  plant  or  a  factory  is  possible,  as  long  as  the  investor  finds  a  reliable  and  honest  local  partner.    The  most  viable  strategy  is  to  start  investing  in  SMEs,  which  have  promising  growth  potential  with  less  hassle  and  bureaucracy.  This  will  allow  the  investors  to  get  a  feel  of  the  market,  learn  how  to  navigate  the  system  and  gain  experience  and  reputation  in  Myanmar.  Once  these  SMEs  grow  and  become  reputable,  the  doors  will  automatically  open  to  new  larger  and  more  sophisticated  ventures.      Things  are  moving  fast  in  Myanmar.  My  first  trip  was  in  September  2012  where  traffic  jams  were  acceptable,  big  tourist  sights  were  free  of  charge  and  I  couldn’t  bargain  for  anything,  as  the  price  they  offered  was  the  actual  selling  price.    On  my  second  trip,  just  3  months  later,  the  traffic  situation  had  worsened,  the  main  pagoda  had  a  5  USD  entrance  fee  and  shop  owners  understood  how  the  tourism  industry  works.  Now  there  are  two  big  malls,  a  Cineplex,  burger  chains  from  Korea  and  Malaysia  and  a  thriving  nightlife.    Things  are  moving  fast.  One  shouldn’t  miss  the  opportunity  that  exists  in  what  will  be  a  major  Southeast  Asian  economy  in  years  to  come.