01 Microsoft Access

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Microsoft Access

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01 Microsoft Access

  1. 1. Presented by: FOR-IAN V. SANDOVAL Computer Instructor Next
  2. 2. Chapter 1 - Review of Database Managers Software Chapter 2 - Getting Started with Access Chapter 3 - Touring the Access Database Chapter 4 - Planning and Creating a Custom Database Chapter 5 - Working with Fields Chapter 6 - Working with Tables Chapter 7 - Querying a Database Chapter 8 - Creating Reports Chapter 9 - Creating Forms Chapter 10 - Improving the Appearance of Forms & Reports Back Next
  3. 3. Chapter 11 - Inserting Information from Other Sources Chapter 12 - Working on the World Wide Web Chapter 13 - Managing a Database Chapter 14 - Customizing Access Chapter 15 - Working with VBA
  4. 4. Database Managers Software are programs for organizing and managing data and information. Examples: FoxPro, Fox Base, Cliffers, D-base (I, II, III & IV) Microsoft Access (97/2000/2003/2007)
  5. 5. Database is rather technical word for a collection of information that is organized as a list. This definition might be oversimplified, but whenever you use or make a a list of information – names, addresses, products, customers, or invoice – you using a database. A database that you store on your computer however, is much more flexible and powerful than a simple list you keen of paper, in your card file or in your address book.
  6. 6. Microsoft Access is a database program that allows you to: • Store an almost limitless amount of information • Retrieve information based on selection criteria you specify. • Create forms that make it easier to enter information. • Generate meaningful and insightful reports that can combine data, text, graphics & other objects. • Share information easily over the Web.
  7. 7. Application Name Menu Bar Title Bar Database Toolbar Application Icon Format Database Toolbar Database Window Task Pane Status Bar Switch Board
  8. 8. Database Window Toolbar Objects Bar List of Objects Groups Bar
  9. 9. Database Objects Description Tables Grids that store related information such as a list of customer addresses Queries A question you ask a database to help locate specific information Forms A window that is designed to help you enter information easily and accurately Reports Summaries of information that are designed to be readable and accessible
  10. 10. Database Objects Description Pages Separate files outside the Access database in HTML format that can be placed on the Web to facilitate sharing data with the world wide web Macros Stored series of commands that carry out an action Modules Programs you can write using Microsoft Visual Basic
  11. 11. FILE MENU EDIT MENU VIEW MENU
  12. 12. INSERT MENU FORMAT MENU RECORDS MENU
  13. 13. TOOLS MENU WINDOW MENU HELP MENU
  14. 14. TASK PANE DATABASE TOOLBAR FORMATTING DATABASE TOOLBAR WEB TOOLBAR
  15. 15. Tabs Text box Option Button Dropdown Check Box List Box Dropdown Arrows Command Button
  16. 16. When you are working with an existing database, however you don’t need to worry about the complexities of database design. You just need to know how to get around the database design. The tasks you are likely to perform with an existing database include entering and viewing data or subsets of data, creating and printing reports, and working efficiently with all the windows in front of you.
  17. 17. • Not all databases fit on any of the Wizards’ predefined choices, you may need to create database “from scratch”. • Careful Planning involves: 1. Determine the purpose and scope of your database 2. Decide what tables your database will contain and the contents of those table will be 3. Define how data in one table is related to data in another table
  18. 18. • What kind of data are you collecting? • What kind of data are you entering? • How are the data values are related to one another? • Can your data be organized into separate smaller groups? • What kind of safeguards can you create to ensure that errors do not creep into your data?
  19. 19. • When you create a table decide what fields to include and the appropriate format for those fields. • Choosing the correct data types helps you manage your data and reduces the possibility of data-entry errors.
  20. 20. • Primary keys are those fields whose values uniquely identify each record in the table, although primary keys are not required, their use is one way of removing the possibility of duplicate records existing within the table.
  21. 21. • Specifying Common Fields – a common field existing in two or more tables; allowing you to match records from one table with records in the other tables. • When the Primary Key as a common field, it • is called a foreign key in the second table. Three types of relationships one-to-one, one-to-many, and many-to-many.
  22. 22. • Referential Integrity, a set of rules that control how you can delete or modify data between related tables. It protects you from erroneously changing data in a primary table required by a related table. • Apply referential integrity when: a. the common field is the primary table’s primary key b. the related fields have the same format c. both tables belong to the same database
  23. 23. • Referential integrity forces you to do: a. before adding a record to a related table, a matching record must already exist in the primary table b. the value of the primary key in the primary table cannot be changed if matching records exists in a related table c. a record in the primary key table cannot deleted if the matching records exist in a related table
  24. 24. • Methods for Creating A Table a. Datasheet View b. Design View c. Table Wizard d. Importing e. Linking
  25. 25. • The important part of creating database is field design. • Designing fields allow you to: 1. Assign a data type so the field accepts and display data in the appropriate format. 2. Include input masks that guide users during data entry. 3. Specify whether data must be entered into certain fields.
  26. 26. 4. Include a default data value for a field. 5. Include validation checks to ensure that correct data is entered. 6. Accommodate data whose values are taken from the lookup lists.
  27. 27. Field names can contain up to 64 characters and can include numbers and spaces.
  28. 28. Data Type Description Text (default) Text or combination of text and numbers, as well as numbers that don’t require calculations. Limited to 255 characters. Memo A lengthy text or combination of text and numbers. Limited to 64,000 characters. Number Numeric data used in mathematical calculations.
  29. 29. Data Type Description Date / Time Date and time values for the years 2000 through 9999. Currency Currency values and numeric data used in mathematical calculations involving data with one to four decimal places. Values are accurate to 15 digits on the left side of the decimal separator. AutoNumber A unique sequential number (incremented by 1) or random number Access assigns whenever you add a new record to a table.
  30. 30. Data Type Description Yes / No A field containing only one of two values (i.e. Yes/No, True/False, On/Off) OLE Object An object (such as a Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet) linked to or embedded in an Access table. Hyperlink A link that when clicked takes the user to another file, a location in a file, or a sit in an Access Table Lookup A wizard that helps you to create a Wizard field whose values are chosen from the values in another table, query or list of values.
  31. 31. TEXT FIELD PROPERTIES Field Action Field Size Specify the maximum number of characters (up to 255) that can be entered in the field. Format Specify how the data for the field will appear on the screen. Input Mask Specify a format or pattern in which data must be entered.
  32. 32. Field Action Caption Enter a label for the field when used on a form. If you don’t enter a caption, Access uses the field name as the label. Default Value Specify a value that Access enters automatically. Validation Enter expression that limits the Rule values that can be entered in the field. Validation Text Enter an error message that appears when a prohibited by the validation rule is entered.
  33. 33. Field Action Required Indicate whether data entry is required. Allow Zero Specify if field allows zero length Length text strings. Indexed Indicate whether Access will keep an index of field values. Unicode Indicate whether you want Access Compression to save space if only plain text is entered.
  34. 34. NUMERIC FIELD SIZES Field Size Range Storage Byte Integers from 0 to 255 1 byte Integer Integers from -32,768 to 2 bytes 32,767 Long Integer Integers for -2,147,483,648 4 bytes to 2,147,483647 Single From -3.402823E38 to 4 bytes -1.401298E-45 (negative values) and
  35. 35. Field Size Range Storage From 1.401298E-45 to 3.402823E38 (positive values) Double From -1.797693E308 to 8 bytes -4.940656E-324 (negative values) and 1.797693E308 to 4.940656E324 (positive values) Replication Values used to establish 16 bytes ID unique identifiers
  36. 36. GENERAL AND TEXT FORMATTING SYMBOLS Symbol Description Data Format Display ! Left align 321 ! 321 < Lowercase Today < today > Uppercase Today < TODAY “ABC” Display quoted 20 & “ lbs.” 20 lbs. text as literal (space) Display a blank 16 & “oz.” 16 oz. space
  37. 37. Symbol Description Data Format Display Display next 10 &k 10k character as literal @ Character is 2217711 @@@- 221-77 required @@@ 11 @ & Character not Mr &. Mr. required * Fill available Hello &*! Hello!!!! space with next character [color] Display values For-Ian [gray] For-Ian in color
  38. 38. NUMERIC AND CURRENCY FORMATTING SYMBOLS Symbol Description Data Format Display # Display a digit 15 # 15 or nothing 0 Display a digit 20.1 #.00 20.10 or 0 . Display a 15 #. 15. decimal separator
  39. 39. Symbol Description Data Format Display , Display 24829 #,### 24,829 thousand separator $ Display the 19.9 $#.00 $19.00 literal character, “$” % Multiple the 0.95 #% 95% value by 100 and append a percent symbol E, E+, Scientific 284121 #.00E+ 284E+0 e-, e+ Notation 00 5
  40. 40. PRE-DEFINED DATE FORMATS Format Display General Date 4/5/08 5:42:25 PM Long Date Saturday, April 5, 2008 Medium Date 5-Apr-08 Short Date 4/4/08 Long Time 5:34:23 PM Medium Time 10:00 AM Short Time 14:00
  41. 41. • Input masks allows you to control what values a database user can enter into a field. It consists of literal characters such as dots, parenthesis, and placeholder. • Placeholder is a text character indicating where the should insert values such as the underline.
  42. 42. INPUT MASK SYMBOLS Symbol Description 0 Digit 0 to 9 (required) 9 Digit 0 to 9 (optional) # Digit or spaces L Letter A-Z (required) ? Letter A-Z (optional) > Make the following character uppercase
  43. 43. Symbol Description A Letter or digit (required) & Any character or space (required) C Any character or space (optional) < Make following character lowercase
  44. 44. • Required values means that Access refuses to accept record until you enter an acceptable value for that field area • Default Values is a value Access uses unless a user enters a different one.
  45. 45. • Field caption is text displayed alongside a field to better describe it purpose and content. • It can contain up to 2048 characters including spaces.
  46. 46. • An index in Access is an invisible data structure that stores the sort order of a table based on the indexed fields or fields. • It helps you locate and sort information quickly, especially in a very large table.
  47. 47. • When you need explicit control over data entered in a field, such as range of numbers or dates. • You can reinforce a validation rule, which causes Access to test values a user enters in a field. • You can use the expression builder to create a validation rule by selecting the functions, constants you need for your rule from a list of options.
  48. 48. As you select options and type variables, the expression appears in this pane. Click a button to insert one of these Double-click to frequently used display a list of functions, Access Functions constants and operators. The individual functions, constants and Click to display a operators appear list of Access for the selected constants group in this pane. Click to display a list The options for the selected of Access operators group (Functions, Constants or Operators) appear in this pane.
  49. 49. • The Lookup Wizard helps you create a field that displays either of two kinds of lists during the data entry: 1.Lookup list that displays values looked up from the existing table or query 2.Value list that displays a fixed set of values you enter when you create field
  50. 50. • If you want to create a Lookup field manually or to make changes to the field created by the wizard, you can do so by changing the values in the Lookup properties.
  51. 51. • You can locate records based on the text they contain with the Find feature. • You can enter and edit data more accurately with features like AutoCorrect, copy, collect, and paste, and language features. • You can display records in either ascending or descending order based on the contents of a specific field. • You can arrange records and columns, so your information is listed in the order you want.
  52. 52. • You can adjust rows and columns • You can also views subdatasheets that show groups of data related to the records in • your can apply filter to change which records You table. are displayed.
  53. 53. OUTLINE 6.1 SEARCHING FOR & REPLACING TEXT 6.1.1 Search for Text in the Current Field 6.1.2 Refine a Search 6.1.3 Find & Replace Text 6.2. 6.2 ENTERING DATA ACCURATELY W/ AUTOCORRECT 6.2.1 Enable AutoCorrect 6.2.2 Correct Errors As You Type 6.2.3 Add an AutoCorrect Entry 6.2.4 Set AutoCorrect Options
  54. 54. OUTLINE 6.3 EDITING TEXT 6.3.1 Select Text 6.3.2 Delete Text 6.3.3 Insert Text 6.3.4 Use Cut, Copy & Paste to Move or 6.2. Copy Text 6.4 WORKING W/ LANGUAGE 6.4.1 Check the Spelling in the Table 6.4.2 Customize Spelling Option 6.4.3 Enable Multiple Language Editing
  55. 55. OUTLINE 6.5 ARRANGING COLUMNS 6.5.1 Move a Column 6.5.2 Hide a Column 6.5.3 Display A Hidden Column 6.5.4 Freeze or Unfreeze Columns 6.2. 6.6 CHANGING THE SIZE OF ROWS AND COLLUMNS 6.6.1 Change the Column Width 6.6.2 Change the Row Height
  56. 56. OUTLINE 6.7 MANAGING COLUMNS IN DATASHEET VIEW 6.7.1 Insert a Column 6.7.2 Rename a Column 6.7.3 Delete a Column 6.2. 6.8 REPAIRING ERRORS 6.8.1 Enable Name AutoCorrect 6.8.2 Log Name AutoCorrect Changes 6.9 MOVING TO A SPECIFIC RECORD IN A TABLE 6.9.1 Move to a Record
  57. 57. OUTLINE 6.10 REARRANGING RECORDS 6.10.1 Sort Records Based on One Field 6.10.2 Change the Order of Records Based on6.2. Multiple Fields 6.11 COPYING & PASTING RECORDS 6.11.1 Copy & Paste A New Record 6.12 VIEWING SUBDATASHEET 6.12.1 Display or Hide Subdatasheet 6.12.2 Insert Subdatasheet in Table
  58. 58. OUTLINE 6.13 USING FILTERS TO VIEW SPECIFIC RECORDS 6.13.1 Filter a Table by Selection 6.13.2 Clear A Filter From A Table 6.2. 6.13.3 Save a Filter As A Query 6.14 CREATING COMPLEX FILTERS USING A FORM 6.14.1 Create an AND or OR Filter
  59. 59. • Focus on only the information you ed by displaying only a few fields from a large table. • Apply functions and other expressions to fields to arrive at calculated results. • Add, update or delete records in tables; or create entirely new tables. • Summarize group values from one table and display the result in a table.
  60. 60. • Save a query definition that access will treat as a table for the purpose of crating forms and reports. • Retrieve information stored in multiple tables, even if table are not open.
  61. 61. OUTLINE 7.1 UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENT TYPE OF QUERIES 7.1.1 Select Query 7.1.2 Crosstab Query 6.2. 7.1.3 Action Query 7.1.4 Parameter Query 7.2 CREATING QUERIES IN ACCESS 7.2.1 From Scratch 7.2.2 From Wizard
  62. 62. OUTLINE 7.3 CREATING A QUERIES USING THE QUERY WIZARD 7.3.1 Create a Simple Query Using the Query Wizard 7.4 CREATING QUERIES IN A DESIGN 6.2. VIEW 7.5 CHANGING THE QUERY FIELDS 7.5.1 Add a Field to a Query 7.5.2 Rename a Field From a Query 7.5.3 Add a Field From Another Table to a Query
  63. 63. OUTLINE 7.6 SPECIFY CRITERIA FOR A SINGLE FIELD IN A QUERY 7.7 SPECIFY CRITERIA FOR MULTIPLE FIELD 6.2. 7.8 CREATING QUERIES WITH COMPARISON AND LOGICAL OPERATORS 7.8.1 Use a Comparison Operators 7.8.2 Use the Logical Operators
  64. 64. OUTLINE 7.9 PERFORMING CALCULATIONS IN A QUERIES 7.9.1 Create a Calculated Field 7.10 CREATING A PARAMETER QUERY 7.11 FINDING DUPLICATE FIELDS 6.2. 7.12 FINDING UNMATCHED RECORDS 7.13 CREATE A NEW TABLE WITH A QUERY 7.14 ADDING RECORDS WITH A QUERY 7.15 DELETING RECORDS IN A QUERY
  65. 65. OUTLINE 7.16 CREATE A QUERY IN UPDATE RECORDS 7.17 SUMMARIZIN A CROSSTAB QUERY 7.18 CREATE A SQL-SPECIFIC QUERY 6.2.

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