Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Responding to the Climate Change challenge in Britain’s newest National Park
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Responding to the Climate Change challenge in Britain’s newest National Park

256
views

Published on

Andrew Lee. Director of Strategy and Partnerships, South Downs National Park Authority …

Andrew Lee. Director of Strategy and Partnerships, South Downs National Park Authority

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
256
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • 2010 Defra Circular’s Vision for the English National Parks and the Broads: By 2030 English National Parks and the Broads will be places where: • There are thriving, living, working landscapes notable for their natural beauty and cultural heritage. They inspire visitors and local communities to live within environmental limits and to tackle climate change. The wide-range of services they provide (from clean water to sustainable food) are in good condition and valued by society. • Sustainable development can be seen in action. The communities of the Parks take an active part in decisions about their future. They are known for having been pivotal in the transformation to a low carbon society and sustainable living. Renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, low carbon transport and travel and healthy, prosperous communities have long been the norm.
  • Potential Sustainability Measures for Capron House Refurbishment Project as identified in Feasibility Study We are seeking to achieve at least BREEAM ‘very Good’ accreditation for the project. This is a challenging target for refurbishment of a historic Listed Building. The project team will also be assessing whether an ‘Excellent’ accreditation might be a feasible prospect – ‘Excellent’ accreditation requires certain mandatory credits to be achieved, some of which are outwith direct control of the project team, (e.g. proximity to public transport) therefore this may not be an achievable prospect. You could add to your list re the building: - use of natural fibre ('hydroscopic'/ 'breathable') insulations to voids within the historic fabric - replacement of single-glazed metal windows with double-glazed - control of air movements/ draughts to limit heat loss - replacement of services to include measures such as: - full control of heating and ventilation systems - insulation of heating services and efficient heat emitters etc. (There are of also your 'operational' measures as per the BREEAM docs such as: - building procurement methods, materials selection etc - provisions such as: -bicycle parking - showers and changing - etc etc).
  • Transcript

    • 1. Responding to the Climate Change challengein Britain’s newest National Park – and theopportunities for business Andrew Lee, Director of Strategy & Partnerships
    • 2. I will coverSnapshot of South Downs National ParkA framework for developing our response to Climate Change:• Understanding the evidence: impact scenarios and footprint;• Land management for carbon sequestration/increased resilience;• Reducing demand: eg housing, food, transport;• Deployment of renewables;• Communications and behaviour change
    • 3. Designation of a National Park• 31 March 2010• 10th to be designated in England
    • 4. Facts and Figures Length Eastbourne/Winchester 160 km Area 1637 sq km Population in the Park 110,000 Visitor Numbers Over 39 m visitor days/year Area farmed/managed 85% Woodland 20% Highest point 280m at Blackdown Coastline 20.5km
    • 5. Purpose 2 Purpose 1 To promote To conserve and opportunitiesenhance the natural for the understanding beauty, wildlife and and enjoyment of the cultural heritage Special qualities of the area. of the Park by the public. Duty To seek to foster the social and economic well-being of local communities Responding to Climate Change
    • 6. 2010 Defra Circular’s Vision for the English National Parks and the Broads:By 2030 English National Parks and the Broads will be places where:• There are thriving, living, working landscapes notable for their natural beauty and culturalheritage. They inspire visitors and local communities to live within environmental limits andto tackle climate change. The wide-range of services they provide (from clean waterto sustainable food) are in good condition and valued by society.• Sustainable development can be seen in action. The communities of the Parks take anactive part in decisions about their future. They are known for having been pivotal in thetransformation to a low carbon society and sustainable living. Renewableenergy, sustainable agriculture, low carbon transport and travel and healthy,prosperous communities have long been the norm.
    • 7. Tools at our disposalSDNPA brings to the table: Public mandate Convening power Some new money People on the ground Planning powers
    • 8. Understanding the EvidenceScenarios by 2080 for the South East (including the National Park)• Summer mean temperatures up between 3 °C and 4.9 °C, winter between 2.6 °C and 3.7 °C – the hottest day temperature could increase by up to 10 °C.• Winters wetter and summers drier – precipitation likely to decrease by 14 to 28% in summer and increase by 18 to 30% in winter – rainfall on the wettest day could increase by up to 45%..• Cloud cover will reduce. In summer by up to -18%.• Sea level (cf London) is likely to increase by 30.5 and 43.3 cm. • Information provided by Natural England 2009
    • 9. Understanding the Evidence (contd)2080 predictions for the South East• Coastal defences will come under greater threat from sea level rise and increased storm events;• Changes in phenology – already signs in the South East, with evidence that the time the first leaves emerge on oak trees in Surrey is earlier each year.• Changing species ranges and habitat requirements – conditions for some species in South East England may become less favourable.• Ground water and rivers – falling groundwater levels and low river-flows in summer. • Information provided by Natural England 2009
    • 10. Land management and carbonDual aims: carbon sequestration / increased resilience;National Park is 85% farmland and 20% (overlaps) woodland;Huge potential to improve carbon balance by more sustainable land management eg:• Agriculture on thin chalk soils (new techniques and technologies);• Management of flood plains in river valleys;• Forestry techniques and heathland managementBUT: evidence base still very patchy
    • 11. ReducingDemand:Knowing where theemissions comefrom:Understandingour CarbonFootprint
    • 12. Reducing Demand: Housing• 110,000 residents within National Park;• c50,000 homes in total;• Market towns like Lewes and Petersfield• c250 new homes built per year since 2001Business opportunities in retrofit, microrenewables etc.National Park can create opportunities for community scale
    • 13. Reducing Demand: Transport• Huge flows - 25,000 in, 23,000 out;• At least 39m visitor days per year;• 63% of commuters use car, 84% of visitors;• 15 railway stations in or next to Park;Local Sustainable Transport Fund provides £3.7m new money.Business opportunities in bike hire, information, localservices,community buses as well as main transport providers
    • 14. Case Study: Sustainable Travel Solutions£18.2m total package - DfT £3.9m. 2015 aims are:switch 370,000 visitors to more sustainable modes (12% to 14%).2% reduction in the proportion arriving by car (88% to 86%),saving c11,000 t CO2 from 2012 to 2015
    • 15. Renewablesneed to find appropriate combination for this protected landscape;wind, solar, hydro, woodfuel, anaerobic digestion may all play a role;large scale onshore wind highly controversial;clear business opportunities in microrenewables and woodfuel :may provide multiple benefits in terms of carbon savings, jobs and(in latter case) conservation management.we are undertaking a detailed energy study
    • 16. Case Study - Woodfuel• could help deliver both NP Purposes and its Duty;• potential to heat more than 9,000 homes;• could replace oil equivalent of > £8 million/year• > 2,000kW installed to date, using around 2,000m³/year• 12 major/estate based installations made or planned
    • 17. Woodheat Installations Woodheat Solutions googlemap: https://maps.google.co.uk/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=112016510990366938432.00046cb26b5d97d10dd3b&z=8
    • 18. Case Study: Woodland Carbon CodeAims to provide assurance to investors that new woodlands grown to absorb CO2 will actually deliver carbon benefitsIncome from the sale of woodland carbon may:• Help encourage landowners to plant more woodland• Provide another source of income for landowners• Make woodland a more attractive land use compared to traditional farming.However, in National Park, more about bringing existing woodlandback into management rather than about new planting
    • 19. Case Study:Eon proposalsfor RampionOffshoreWindFarm:National Parkresponse will takeinto account carbonbenefits balancedagainst landscapeand cable routingimpacts. http://www.eon-uk.com/generation/3998.aspx
    • 20. Rampion Offshore Wind Farm proposals • 195 turbines offshore from Brighton • 2 offshore electrical substations and c13km subsea cable • Onshore underground cables of around 30km • sufficient electricity equivalent c450,000 average UK households BUT: cables would cross National Park at its narrowest and most vulnerable point http://www.eon-uk.com/downloads/Rampion_Offshore_Wind_Farm_FAQs_February_2012
    • 21. Communications and behaviour change• National Park needs to promote informed debate based on real evidence and policy;• can also lead by example in own operations;• policy framework through Management Plan and Local Plan should enable sustainable business models and inward investment to National Park economy.
    • 22. Case Study: South Downs Centre, Midhurst
    • 23. Aim: BREEAM ‘Very Good’ or above, living demonstration of potential toretrofit existing commercial buildings across the National Park: • Biodiverse ‘brown’ roof, and PV cells covering to flat roofs • New insulation on 1930s extension – ‘foamed’ glass (66% recycled) with outer face finished in lime render that is carbon neutral • New ‘breathable’ insulation system to the inside face of the 1900- 1920s extensions • Biomass boiler plant, low energy lighting throughout, secondary glazing
    • 24. Conclusions• Climate Change is one of the greatest threats to the landscapes for which the National Park was designated;• Yet the wrong CC policies and measures could damage these protected landscapes;• The NPA is still developing its approach, but has a range of levers (planning policy, funding, communications, partnerships);• Need to promote informed public debate, and help create right climate for investment in sustainable and low carbon business models within South Downs National Park.
    • 25. Thank you, and please join the South Downs online Forum at:www.southdowns.gov.uk/forum andrew.lee@southdowns.gov.uk 07795 287 538 or 01730 811774 South Downs National Park Authority, Hatton House, Bepton Road, Midhurst, West Sussex, GU29 9LU