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Social Governance

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Social Governance Seminars ran by Amaze in June 2011

Social Governance Seminars ran by Amaze in June 2011

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  • This talks about why working with Unilever, Coca-cola, Bridgestone in territories such as Australia, Africa its not just about the culture but we can understand and share our expereinces and insights working on other global brands with HTC. It ’ s a constant learning cycle We perform localisation reviews for our clients based on our understanding of the different expectations of markets and their audiences. For example, when  delivering for Lexus, we know that to Germany the technical data is one of the most important things to their audience however for Italy it ’s about the image, assets and the look of the product. We adapt our delivery to suit the market’s need.
  • We perform localisation reviews for our clients based on our understanding of the different expectations of markets and their audiences. For example, when  delivering for Lexus, we know that to Germany the technical data is one of the most important things to their audience however for Italy it ’s about the image, assets and the look of the product. We adapt our delivery to suit the market’s need.
  • We as a business based on our experience have understood the issues, through what we have been through
  • Resources Organisations are constantly under resourced or have no planning, specific markets we see combining many roles, digital is not one of them. Also we see that centrally there lies no one person responsble for digital, usually that role is spread across various other marketing roles.
  • “ help me versus set me free” (idea that you have different markets with very different perspectives, some want to be spoon fed, others to be left alone) Resistance comes in to forms, first there sometimes is an attitude to change This is where we see organisations fighting for the right to adopt change, IT vs comms, who owns what, frustration and where responsibility lies, usually stakeholders within organisations want to change they just don ’ t know how to cut through the internal politics
  • Culture is a huge barrier, what works for one country does not work for others. We also see that from a central perpesctive some organisations may have manifestos from the US or Japan. Cultural might be the market which takes the lead, you have to be sensitive to how you manage around this Use BSEU as an example, in the Japanese culture they do things in a certain way, shy away from contrversy and don ’ t comment in fear of saying the wrong thing
  • Understanding of the Audience They are all different, one size does not fit all and they have many differences, Don ’ t assume that you understand your audience online in Italy and assume that it will be the same in Germany or Spain.
  • A centrally coordinated strategy must account for the major differences that exist at a market level… //
  • Top line trends, German use research and investigation Italy and Spain use for entertainment France close to catch up UK can participate in US social channels very easy (language)
  • Brand Consistency across for brands is key, what are the key consistent themes, how do we create a central process that supports and give the countries autonomy and flexibility
  • Looking at the digital generation divide The new pioneers vs the old guard, the old guard makes the decisions with out understanding what technology can do Technology is anything after you were born
  • Speed Digital is now 24 seven and the rise of real time marketing means we need to act quickly and effectively. Social channels are constantly evolving, Discuss tweet about european trade body
  • Consistency Autonomy to make changes but at the same time what to ensure consistency
  • Communication Story of BSEU with social media + New CMS platforms
  • Collaboration Getting markets to communicate with each other is a tough thing to get working It might be loss of interest because of resource, no single point of contact they can rely on It might even be the fact that the technology doesn ’ t support what they want to do. To ensure collaboration, you need communication across all levels with central becoming the hub of that communication.
  • The Pan Euro Challenge is
  • The challenge one dept the ‘ Interactive team ” through to the age of the digitised organisation where digital permeates the organisation
  • We need to change this model to show how we get them on a roadmap to engagement, need to get
  • We need to change this model to show how we get them on a roadmap to engagement, need to get
  • We need to change this model to show how we get them on a roadmap to engagement, need to get
  • We need to change this model to show how we get them on a roadmap to engagement, need to get
  • The only way we can look at this is by understanding how the organisation operates what are its strengths and weaknesses Developing a governance model. Overall we are trying to establish what the Governance Framework is. To do this we have to identify who the governance community are – these are the people who follow the governance model – and what are their responsibilities What are the the decisions that need to be made throughout the process and who makes them Who are the people who have to contribute in this process and how do they do it? E.g. Agencies
  • The only way we can look at this is by understanding how the organisation operates what are its strengths and weaknesses Developing a governance model. Overall we are trying to establish what the Governance Framework is. To do this we have to identify who the governance community are – these are the people who follow the governance model – and what are their responsibilities What are the the decisions that need to be made throughout the process and who makes them Who are the people who have to contribute in this process and how do they do it? E.g. Agencies
  • Outputs Once the workshops have happened, we can analyse the framework that needs to be put in place. Once the framework is established, the policies and standards that are overseen through governance can be established Use Toyota as the example here!!
  • Don ’ t thing you know what the answers are going to be before you have done the work The only way we can look at this is by understanding how the organisation operates what are its strenghts and weaknesses Developing a governance model. Overall we are trying to establish what the Governance Framework is. To do this we have to identify who the governance community are – these are the people who follow the governance model – and what are their responsibilities What are the the decisions that need to be made throughout the process and who makes them Who are the people who have to contribute in this process and how do they do it? E.g. Agencies
  • Understand resourcing issues & workflow constraints Lack of global collaboration Bottle necked learning Use and talk about Bridgestone as an example If you don ’ t create the right toolkits and the right processes which are driven centrally then you will run into problems, people end up giving up and sticking to tried and trusted methods, without engagement within the local markets you don ’ t stand a chance, you need to work with them and get them onboard and then create constant and ongoing dialogue. So in the beginning you need to understand the resourcing issues and workflow constraints and create a model that works for them. Ensure that they are engaged and participate globally Educate and facilitate collaboration within the markets and centrally
  • Relevant central and local comparisons help local managers sharpen strategy. Uncover new opportunities and partner with similar markets to share resource Deep LOCAL ANALYSIS PROVIDES MANAGERS WITH THE TRIGGERS TO DEVELOP QUESTIONNAIRES THAT SURFACE MARKET INSIGHTS. THESE QUESTIONAIRES AND SURVEYS CAN BE SHARED BETWEEN MARKETS TO INCREASE EFFICIENCIES
  • SOCIALIZER. A TOOLKIT THAT CAN BE USED THROUGHOUT THE COMPANY FOR SOCIAL SHARING AND LEARNING WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? PROVIDES A PLATFORM AND FRAMEWORK TO REINFORCE GLOBAL SOCIAL STRATEGY ALLOWS LOCAL USERS TO SURFACE LEARNINGS SHARE BEST PRACTICE ’S AND DECREASE RESOURCES INCONSISTENT REPORTING, VARYING TOOLKITS, DIFFERENT RESEARCH VENDORS, Choose the right tools for the right reasons
  • PROBABLE SOCIAL SCENARIOS based on real insight CAN SPEAK TO ALL MARKETS AND SERVE AS GUIDLEINES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL INITIATIVES you have to be able to give this context. WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? ITS SHOWS HOW TO IMPLEMENT THROUGH CONCRETE EXAMPLES SHOW WHAT SHOULD AND SHOULD NOT BE DONE MAKE SMARTER DECISIONS BY CALCULATING IMPACT BEFORE EXECUTION Create further insight better socialisation more relevant information and content back to the business
  • Pan european businesses have organised themselves along a continuum from centralised through to devolved (and evolved
  • This we need to talk about IT once had control, big systems unable to adopt to marketing, the fight for autonomy etc
  • The generation divide how do we bridge this gap
  • Get the roles defined, who does what and then we get markets to collaborate
  • Need to get top management to buy into the process, otherwise its an uphill struggle. Ask ourselves how do we get to top management, Top down manifesto to drive through the changes you need
  • The only way you can do this is by creating an education programme internally, whether working with your agency (knowledge centres) but then create strong processes and policies and then communicate throughout the organisation.
  • You then can start to build a centre of excellence without locking away vital knowledge, by sharing, educating and understanding ongoing market trends
  • This can only be for 10 mins
  • This can only be for 10 mins
  • ½ day goal to get content live Across 41 websites in 31 langauges
  • Amaze provides a centralised managed services department that acts and responds as an extension of the lexus team We assist with the planning, creation and roll out of websites across all lexus European markets We also work with the markets in determining new functional requirements and turning these into new site features available to all markets
  • Each market is free to engage with local experts and the model must support that way of working too Communication can be to market agencies or to the markets themselves Amaze ’ s support managers develop relationships with one or more markets Clever use of technology allows all these process to happen relatively independently but also collaboratively
  • From 18 to 25 countries This wasn ’ t delivered to us, we had to develop this for lexus and didn ’ t happen over night Along the way we have understood how to develop and implement strategy, governance and support models and processes that fir pan – European & global businesses
  • Multiple markets, territories and regions Multiple product families, passenger tyres, motorcyle tyres, off road, truck Product families marketing indepentantly both centrally and at the market level Their web content management system did not provide the business support required and as a consequence, markets where off to do their own thing with their own agencies In summary, Central had lost control of their digital estate and the markets had lost faith in central ’ s ability to support them
  • The wider engagement was to bring Bridgestone up to date digitally across all products and markets. Governance was one element. Strong consumer content that is used by local markets as the main instrument for customer engagement
  • Once the workshops have happened, we can analyse the framework that needs to be put in place. Once the framework is established, the policies and standards that are overseen through governance can be established Use Toyota as the example here!! Lack of visibility Central planning, - Market responsibility Engagement on future projects Disenfranchised markets Unavailable content - product and brand not available centrally - markets had created their own content impacting brand and message Limited budgets & resources
  • Central Content Management technology did not support business requirements therefore markets had gone their own way Lack of resources and in house digital knowledge meant that each market employed their own agencies Fragmented & Fatigued
  • Once the workshops have happened, we can analyse the framework that needs to be put in place. Once the framework is established, the policies and standards that are overseen through governance can be established Use Toyota as the example here!!
  • 1. Centralised governance model – close to the client and indentified that this model fitted very well with their centralised corporate structure 2. Dedicated Head of Digital to own the digital strategy & vision 3. Country Planners to oversee local skills and inter-market collaboration 4. Make recommendations on more appropriate technology 5. Develop a service model for content & website technology support 6. Test the model & iterate – no model is perfect from day one, use this opportunity to fine tune the model on one market
  • At a high level In this example, the central governance model had separate but supportive roles and responsibilities Central Governance – Digital Strategy, Web site roll out management Central Support – get into the mindset of a service provider to address market concerns with lack of support Local Markets offices – responsible for localisation of content, identifying products to be promoted, report on campaigns, and they are still free to have their local agency to fill in skills gaps – but the goal would be for all services to be provided centrally
  • In Detail Head of Digital Located at European HQ, Brussels Existing employee / New hire / Outsourced – Amaze will be helping Bridgestone with the hire process Champion the online channel on a group level. E.g. Working with senior product, brand and communication specialists to understand their requirements and to advise on web best practise. Creating and overseeing the corporate site strategy and standards. E.g. creative updates , best practise on usability, analytic, SEO, etc. Developing and managing relationships with core web suppliers . E.g. Technical teams, external consultants, etc.
  • To address limited budgets, they will be combined to provide more services joined up with each other – managed by the Head of Digital Budgets are currently allocate on a per market and product family basis. Money is being spent on projects which are not aligned with each other. The Head of Digital will be responsible for gathering and maintaining central budget for digital spend and then championing the business case to senior management. Planning will be done on an annual basis, broken down into monthly plans and will cover central and local market work Digital activities for all BSEU departments must be gathered into one coherent annual plan, outlining high level requirements and planned activities for the fiscal year. The annual plan must be supported by an estimate ballpark figure for production development, rollout and support for every project. Corporate Website Owner together with senior representative from each product department is required to participate in annual budget planning with BSEU senior management in order to secure sufficient funds for all areas of digital marketing planned for that fiscal year.
  • Country Planners – to address the lack of visbility from both central and market level The country planners glue together the markets and the Head of Digital. The Country Planners works closely with each market. They get to know the market in detail – knowledge base – act as an escalation point. 1 or more markets per planner. The country planners act as a conduit between markets on digital initiatives for knowledge sharing and possible effort/cost savings The country planners work as a team and report to the Head of Digital. Messaging from the Head of Digital is delivered via the country planners Engaging and communicating to markets on behalf of BSEU Ensuring markets are aware of BSEU future planning and how the plans might affect local plans and budgets. Continuously building a knowledge base about local markets Point of contacts and escalations for markets Funnelling information and requirements from markets back to BSEU digital stakeholders Planning rollouts with markets Coordinating translations (local and central) Planning local content integration with markets Planning training and technical guidance for markets Overlooking and resourcing work to the centralised content team Ensuring brand guidelines are followed on local content
  • The centralised support team support both central and the markets. First Line Support Analyst & Content administrators – will help with the issue of lack of content and the markets having to create their own Both roles can be existing employees / New hire / Outsources First Line Support interface Problem management Technical support and liaison with Second Line Support User account administration Content administration Rollout and Technical guidance & training to markets and local agencies Technical documentation and knowledge base maintenance
  • And to finish this section This is the plan for rolling out the goevernance model across all markets. The product families are steadily brought on The cost for the governance roll out is eventually borne from local market budget using a cross charge model for services The central team grows in line with their ability to deliver The support team grows in line with support the markets that use the service
  • reqw
  • reqw
  • Going to introduce 2 key trends that are combining to make digital governance such a business priority
  • The splinternet and realtime marketing
  • You wake up and check your email on your bedside iPad — that ’ s one app. During breakfast you browse Facebook, Twitter, and The Guardian — three more apps. On the way to the office, you listen to a podcast on your smartphone. Another app. At work, you scroll through RSS feeds in a reader and have Skype and IM conversations. More apps. At the end of the day, you come home, make dinner while listening to Spotify, play some games on Xbox Live, and watch a movie on Netflix ’ s streaming service. You ’ ve spent the day on the Internet — but not on the Web. And you are not alone.
  • You wake up and check your email on your bedside iPad — that ’ s one app. During breakfast you browse Facebook, Twitter, and The Guardian — three more apps. On the way to the office, you listen to a podcast on your smartphone. Another app. At work, you scroll through RSS feeds in a reader and have Skype and IM conversations. More apps. At the end of the day, you come home, make dinner while listening to Spotify, play some games on Xbox Live, and watch a movie on Netflix ’ s streaming service. You ’ ve spent the day on the Internet — but not on the Web. And you are not alone.
  • reqw
  • Use quote by Steve Rubel Give examples Social media and the always on consumer On the fly insight Real time cross-market collaboration
  • Multiple platforms – multiple problems Will we have to re-purpose our content for each one? Will we have to tell our story differently in each place? What are we going to say? What devices do our target market use? Where do they live online? When do they go online? Where are they when they connect? What else are they doing?
  • A pan european marketing suite
  • Social Media Governance – All of this is from Forrester 2011   Social presence growing pains. According to our August 2010 WebTrack of brands ’ Facebook presences, 86% of Facebook marketers have multiple fan pages to manage.2 Many marketers will add to that roster. These marketers will face challenges: Will those accounts be aligned by product, region, brand, or some other categorization? Who maintains the passwords, and do they need to be changed every time an employee with social media responsibilities departs the organization? And what unique and exciting social experiences can marketers bring their consumers, beyond the simple status update or wall posting?
  • Decentralization of control. Once the decision is made regarding how an organization ’s social presences will expand, the question of who runs each presence quickly surfaces. An official policy and training program will help, but many marketers lack the plan and resources to ensure that they have a high-level view of all social activities across their companies’ presences. More than 46% of companies with 1,000 or more employees that have a listening platform are already licensing five to 19 individual seats to ensure internal stakeholders are aware of social conversations around their brands.3 .
  • Increased scrutiny of results. With expanding programs comes increased excitement within the organization — which means that more and more managers will be eager to see the results of the social marketers ’ efforts. Nearly 66% of interactive marketers are not currently measuring their social marketing initiatives, and only 14% are planning to measure them soon, so it’s key to determine how more robust programs will be measured before they’re launched.4  .
  • Incorrectly Targeted Social Content Alienates Your Biggest Fans And Hurts Your Business The most obvious problem with your audience finding a social media profile intended for another market is that the content will likely be in the wrong language. In most cases this means non-English speakers struggling with English-language content, but the opposite also occurs: For instance, the Twitter account for Zara, a fashion retailer based in Spain that generates 68% of its revenues outside of Spain, contains mostly Spanish-language posts. Regional dialects can also present a challenge; English speakers searching on Facebook must choose between a US-targeted “Nike Football” page (featuring American football) and a UK-targeted “Nike Football” page (featuring soccer). But language is far from the only problem with incorrectly targeted social media content; sending the wrong message to your customers can have a powerful negative impact on your business. Interactive marketers must also ensure that the messages they display to users in different countries conform to local:  .
  • Promotions and campaigns. In October 2010, McDonald ’s used its @McDonalds Twitter account to post daily updates and promotions for its Monopoly-themed loyalty game. Again, UK audiences who saw these Tweets would have found themselves disappointed; the most recent McDonald’s Monopoly promotion in Britain had already run — and ended — five months earlier..
  • Legal and regulatory considerations. Regulated industries have further reasons to worry about incorrectly targeted social media. Marketers promoting prescription drugs to consumers in the US (where direct-to-consumer marketing is legal) must prevent consumers in other countries (where this type of marketing is typically banned) from accessing this content. Likewise, financial services firms and alcohol and tobacco makers must tailor their marketing efforts to each country ’s unique regulations.
  • A pan european marketing suite
  • A pan european marketing suite
  • 1. Centralised governance model – close to the client and indentified that this model fitted very well with their centralised corporate structure 2. Dedicated Head of Digital to own the digital strategy & vision 3. Country Planners to oversee local skills and inter-market collaboration 4. Make recommendations on more appropriate technology 5. Develop a service model for content & website technology support 6. Test the model & iterate – no model is perfect from day one, use this opportunity to fine tune the model on one market
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Pan - European Digital Governance Challenge 23rd June 2011© Amaze 2011
    • 2. Matt Butterworth //European Strategy Director@mattfolkMatt Clarke //Chief Technical Officer@mbclarke
    • 3. How is all this going to work?You are going to hear us talk about the pan-European challengeHow we have have responded to the challengeWhat we think the future will look likeGet interactive© Amaze 2011
    • 4. "A travelled man is a knowledgeable man”
    • 5. The Pan-European challenge
    • 6. Understanding the challenges
    • 7. “I don’t have the people to make that happen ”
    • 8. “Help me please and set me free”
    • 9. That’s not how we do things in Japan
    • 10. “Nobody uses Facebook in France”
    • 11. Social behaviours differ significantly across borders“A centrally co-ordinated strategy must account for major differencesthat
    • 12. European TrendsT rends per region 2010 to 2011 Germany UK Italy Spain France Blogs and forums lead Social media usage in Significant increases in Entertainment’ as a France has seen the the share of media the UK has reached social engagement. motivation for joining a largest percentage platform yet visits are saturation as growth Percentage of people social network has increase in the on the decline slows increasing from visiting a social media increased from 14% to proportion of the 72% to 78% in the last website increased 10% 23% over the year population engaged Visits to social networks year to 57% Social media with social up from 38% has increased from 14% engagement increased to 51% to 52% over the last year Many social media Visits to video sharing from 47% to 51% Uploading photos as an activities such as sites increased 10% Visits by those managing action has increased from uploading photos, Increases in people Visits by those managing a social profile has 5% to 52% watching video and managing their social a social profile has increased by 12% to 37% commenting on articles profile increased by 7% to 36% France shows the has actually declined Consistent with the trend greatest decline in visits UK’s activities are more towards real-time, visits to a blog, down 8% skewed towards real-time to blogs and forums is in activities decline Entertainment as a motivator has increased 3% in the last year
    • 13. “That messaging won’t work in our market”
    • 14. “I don’t quite get that”
    • 15. “I can do it faster myself thankyou…”
    • 16. “Its fine but I need to make some changes”
    • 17. “I didn’t hear about it until it was too late”
    • 18. “I have no idea what’s worked and what has not in other markets”
    • 19. “and who’s budget does this come out of”
    • 20. Consistency Speed Audience Resistance Resources Knowledge Culture Collaboration Brand CommunicationIn summary…
    • 21. How have businesses responded to thischallenge?
    • 22. Moving from “inside to out”
    • 23. Moving from “inside to out”
    • 24. Identify …The governance ‘community’The decisions that need to be madeThe contributorsDeveloping the Governance Model
    • 25. Determine …The responsibilities of the governance ‘community’Who the decision makers will beThe process for contributionDeveloping the Governance Model
    • 26. Developing the model!Create digital Governance frameworkPolicy guidelinesOngoing training and support for the markets witha EMEA retained teamDeveloping the Governance Model
    • 27. How do we do this?Workshops with central and country inputQuestions such as…Where does product information come from fordigital & social channel management questions?What happens if a complaint comes in?Who will be updating channels?Developing the Governance Model
    • 28. The challenge for brands is to provide this support in anefficient
    • 29. Its about striking the right balance
    • 30. Inter-market learnings and sharing
    • 31. Socialising digital
    • 32. Real digital scenarios
    • 33. Developing a governance model that’s right for your business(and sorry, there’s no magic wand!)”
    • 34. A number of models have emerged toaddress these challenges
    • 35. No one department One department (like A cross – functional team Everyone in the manages or coordinates: Corp communications sits in a centralised company uses digital Similar to Hub andefforts bubble up from the manages all position and helps various safely and consistently Spoke but applicable to edges of the company digital activities markets across all organisations Multinational companies where “companies within companies” act nearly autonomously from each other under a common brandWhich model is most appropriate for your business?
    • 36. IT Legacy versus marketing
    • 37. You might be the boss but you haven’t a clue about digital
    • 38. Key roles and cross market department collaboration
    • 39. How do we get over these challenges?
    • 40. Get C-Level Sponsorship
    • 41. Educate, create processes and policies
    • 42. Create a centre of excellence
    • 43. So tell us some of your experiencesQuestions and answers
    • 44. INTERMISSION
    • 45. Some examplesDeveloping a multiple hub and spoke model
    • 46. 1,700 projects annually½ day and content live42 websites32 languages35 countriesThe challenge
    • 47. Multiple Hub and Spoke model
    • 48. Multiple Hub and Spoke model
    • 49. Multiple Hub and Spoke model
    • 50. Developing a centralised model
    • 51. A recent case study
    • 52. Consistent, localisablecorporate website presence inevery country in Europe- Engaging content- Up to date product information,- Localised consumer content- Interactive toolkitThat SELLS TYRESThe wider challenge
    • 53. Evidence for the need tochangeThe story from the markets - - Lack of visibility - Disenfranchised markets - Unavailable content - Content which knew nobounds - Limited budgets & resourcesThe Issue (1)
    • 54. Evidence for the need tochangeThe story from central -- CMS technology did not support business requirements - Lack of resources & and inhouse digital knowledgeThe issue (2)
    • 55. Fragmented and fatigued
    • 56. Collect the evidence, identifystakeholders & planInterviews with Bridgestone marketofficesInterviews with EuropeanCommunications OfficeAmaze’s experience with otherpan-European organisationsA new way forward
    • 57. 1. Centralised governance model2. Dedicated Head of Digital to own the digital strategy &vision3. Country Planners to oversee local skills and inter-market collaboration4. Make recommendations on more appropriate Web Content Management technology5. Develop a service model for content & website technologysupportOurTest the model6. recommendations & iterate
    • 58. Centralised Governance Roles & Responsibilities
    • 59. TedHead of Digital - corporate website owner
    • 60. Financial and project planning
    • 61. Communication within markets – Country Planners
    • 62. Centralised support team
    • 63. The Future
    • 64. The Future…but its here now!!
    • 65. Digital Governance has always been tough!!
    • 66. But it’s about to get harder… Much harder
    • 67. The Splinternet + Real Time marketing
    • 68. You’ve just spent the day on the Internet – but not the web
    • 69. And your not alone…!
    • 70. 24% of Europeans are online before09.00hrs50% from 09.00-noon30% at lunchtime53% from 14-1700hrs59% from 17-20.00hrs54% from 20.00-00.00hrsWe are moving towards the ‘Always On’ digital age
    • 71. “86% of US mobile internetusers are using theirdevices whilst watching TV ” Microsoft 2010 Attention partiality is now a fact
    • 72. Fragmentation and the ‘always on’consumer present brands withserious challengesMulti-platform/format contentAttentionSpeedUnderstandingFragmentation
    • 73. “OK - so we need a website… and a mobile site (which onesare we going to develop for?). Should we have an app - Appleor Android or both? Oh, and we’d better have a Facebookpage. And a Twitter one. Should we blog? What about aYouTube channel? And all those pictures - they should be onFlickr… I wonder how many people with iPads will want toaccess our site? And then there’s that new HTC tablet, that can
    • 74. Brands are going to need a digital nerve centre
    • 75. Social Media GovernanceAnd today here and now…
    • 76. 86% of Facebook marketers have multiple fanpages to manageSocial presence growing pains (Source Forrester 2011)
    • 77. More than 46% of companies with 1,000 or moreemployees that have a listening platform are alreadylicensing 5 to 19 individual seats to ensure internalstakeholders are aware of socialconversations control (Source Forrester 2011)Decentralisation of around their brands
    • 78. Nearly 66% of interactive marketers are not currentlymeasuring their social marketing initiatives, and only 14%are planning to measure them soonIncreased scrutiny of results (Source Forrester 2011)
    • 79. The Twitter account for Zara, a fashion retailer based inSpain that generates 68% of its revenues outside of Spain,contains mostly Spanish-language postsIncorrectly Targeted Social Content Alienates Your Biggest Fans And Hurts YourBusiness
    • 80. In October 2010, McDonald’s used its @McDonalds Twitteraccount to post daily updates and promotions for itsMonopoly-themed loyalty game. Again, UK audiences whosaw these Tweets would have found themselvesdisappointed; the mostrecent McDonald’s Monopoly promotion in Britain hadPromotions and campaigns (Source Forrester 2011)
    • 81. Regulated industries have further reasons to worry aboutincorrectly targeted social mediaLegal and regulatory considerations (Source Forrester 2011)
    • 82. So how do you take control ofyoursocial marketing programme?
    • 83. Matts bits in here
    • 84. Amaze One
    • 85. So in summary
    • 86. 1. Not all markets are the same – UNDERSTAND THEM2. Resource and Capability3. Education – Education - Education4. C-Level sponsorship5. A KPI framework6. One step at a timeSo in summary
    • 87. Questions and Answers
    • 88. The Pan - European Digital Governance Challenge 23rd June 2011© Amaze 2011