NCV 4 Management Practice Hands-On Support  Slide Show - Module 6
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NCV 4 Management Practice Hands-On Support Slide Show - Module 6

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This slide show complements NCV 4 Management Practice Hands-On Training by Bert Eksteen & Anthony Hill, published by Future Managers Pty Ltd. For more information visit our website......

This slide show complements NCV 4 Management Practice Hands-On Training by Bert Eksteen & Anthony Hill, published by Future Managers Pty Ltd. For more information visit our website www.futuremanagers.net

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  • 1. Management Practice 4
  • 2. Module 6: Team motivation
  • 3. Module 6: Team motivation
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to:
      • explain why it is important to motivate a team and how motivation levels within a team could be assessed
      • apply theories of motivation
      • describe the techniques leaders can use to motivate a team
      • provide feedback to a team
      • recognise achievement
      • empower team members
  • 4. 1. EXPLAIN WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO MOTIVATE A TEAM AND IDENTIFY WAYS OF ASSESSING MOTIVATION WITHIN A TEAM
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • explain why it is important to motivate a team
      • discuss the consequences for a team that lacks motivation
      • identify elements that could cause a lack of motivation in a team
      • identify methods that could be used to assess the levels of motivation in a team
      • assess levels of motivation in a specific team
  • 5. 1.1 Why is it important to motivate a team?
    • Sustainable success in the world of work is dependant on how an organisation’s human resources are motivated to perform!
    • The best companies in the world:
      • constantly measure employee satisfaction using attitude surveys
      • reward the performance of their people by linking pay to performance
      • promote their people from within whenever possible
      • spend a high percentage of their payroll on training their employees
  • 6. Moment of truth The moment of magic The moment of misery Customer Customer Service provider Service provider
  • 7. 1.2.2 The cycle of service
  • 8. Activity 1
    • On your OWN, read the following Case Study .
    • Question: Who was the supplier and who was the customer?
    • Answer: The supplier was “Global Sweets” and the customer was the biggest retailer in a medium-sized town in the Eastern Cape.
    • Question: What were the customer’s service expectations?
    • Answer: The Regional Sales Manager of Global Sweets had requested the customer to kindly allow Global to deliver on a Friday instead of Thursday to help them improve their delivery patterns. The customer accepted on condition that deliveries were early in the morning to avoid getting in the way of customers who started to buy for the weekend from 11h30 onwards.
    • Question: What level of service did the customer receive?
    • Answer: The Regional Sales Manager received a phone call from the customer at 12h15 to say that the delivery truck had just arrived – nearly 4 hours late!
    • Question: What were the reasons for the poor quality service?
    • Answer: Although management communicated to the drivers that they now had to make this customer’s deliveries on a Friday instead of Thursday, drivers saw this as just management ‘messing them around’ yet again and decided to stick to their routine on Fridays and then went to this very large retailer last.
    •   Question: What were the consequences of not meeting customer service expectations in this instance?
    • Answer: The customer threatened to reduce orders and, as chairman of the Retailers Association, to communicate this poor service to other members. The drivers remained fed-up with management for not communicating the reasons for the change.
  • 9. Activity 1
    • In a TEAM of 4 to 7 people, calculate the cost of failure (in Rands) due to not meeting the customer’s expectations.
  • 10. The price of non-conformance Training costs QC Costs Operating costs Operating costs QC Costs Rework Wastage Loss of sales Loss of production
  • 11. Job characteristics leading to a lack of motivation if not in place
  • 12. 1.3 Identify elements that cause a lack of motivation in a team
    • Many organisations have reviewed the content of jobs in order to make them more stimulating and provide:
      • opportunities for personal growth
      • more job responsibility
      • opportunities to participate in decisions affecting the organisation
      • job enrichment
  • 13. Three basic needs
    • Years ago, a researcher by the name of David McClelland and his associates identified three basic needs that they believed are manifested by individuals in the world of work. These are:
      • a need for achievement (nAch) - a desire to excel in comparison to others and to be seen as successful
      • a need for affiliation (nAff) - a desire to have close relationships, feel accepted and to be liked by others
      • a need for power (nPow) - a desire to make other people behave in a way that they would not without this influence.
  • 14. Activity 2
    • Answer the question: “What need is fulfilled if the factor in question is in place?” by ticking the appropriate box.
  • 15. 1.4 Identify methods that could be used to assess the levels of motivation in a team
    • Visual management
    Standard
  • 16. 1.4 Identify methods that could be used to assess the levels of motivation in a team
    • Team review meetings
    • Formal performance appraisal interviews
  • 17. Attitude surveys
  • 18. Activity 3
    • Draw up a typed questionnaire of 15 key questions to assess what you think are important motivators for other people in your class at college.
    • Conduct a survey of your classmates using the questionnaire. Ensure that you provide them with envelopes that can be sealed and returned to you in order to protect confidentiality.
    • Analyse these results and use Excel to draw up a graph of your final results.
    • Provide feedback to your lecturer and your class
  • 19. 2. APPLY THEORIES OF MOTIVATION
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • research two theories of motivation
      • compare the two researched theories of motivation in terms of how each maintains people are motivated to achieve both personally and in a work environment
      • apply the researched theories to a team and decide which best applies to a specific team
      • compile an action plan to motivate a team based on the researched theories
      • identify and discuss which theory of motivation is applicable to self with examples.
  • 20. 2.1 Research two theories of motivation
    • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    • Vroom’s Expectancy Theory of Motivation
  • 21. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • 22. Maslow’s Hierarchy explained by a workplace analogy
    • Assume that you are 30 years of age and live in Gugulethu, Cape Town. You have a family to support and are unemployed.
    • You get up at 5am every morning to go and stand outside the gates of a factory in the hope of a casual job. What are your needs? Clearly your primary focus is to ‘put bread on the table’ for your family – you are driven by hunger and the need for shelter.
    •  
    • Because the factory has urgent orders to produce, you are lucky enough to get a casual job for three days a week for the next month. Your basic physiological needs have been satisfied and your focus now is on ‘safety’ i.e. the security of a potential permanent job. You work very diligently and are noticed by the foreman for your accurate work, good timekeeping and positive attitude.
    •  
  • 23. Maslow’s Hierarchy explained by a workplace analogy
    • The company wins a new export contract and is able to offer you a permanent job. After a couple of weeks, you start to make an effort to get to know your work colleagues better as you become part of a formal work team. This is because your physiological and safety needs have been satisfied and you are now motivated by higher-order social needs – you want to feel that you ‘belong’.
    •  
    • You continue to work hard and are eager to learn new skills. After six months the foreman calls you into the office and informs you that you have been nominated to attend a training course for team leaders. This fulfils your need for recognition and status – after only six months you have been identified as having leadership potential! You feel grateful to the organisation for giving you this opportunity and are motivated to prove to them that their confidence is not misplaced by putting even more effort into your work.
    •  
    • After another two years, you have been promoted, are on top of your job and are studying part-time. You always wanted to do a degree in order to prove to yourself that ‘you’ve got what it takes’. You don’t need to prove anything to other people - your focus now is self-actualisation. You have moved to the top of the hierarchy!
    •  
  • 24. Maslow’s Hierarchy
    • Maslow’s Hierarchy is a valuable tool for managers in the world of work to understand three key principles. These are:
      • not all individuals are motivated by the same things
      • personal circumstances have a powerful impact on individual needs
      • the less organisations generalise about what motivates people and the more they attempt to understand individual needs, the better they are able to “inspire employees to work enthusiastically”
  • 25. Activity 4
    • Rate your personal priorities on a scale of 1 – 5 where: 1 = not at all important, 2 = not important, 3 = neutral, 4 = important and 5 = very important.
    • List which of these needs are physiological (P), safety (S), social (So), esteem (E) or self -actualisation (A).
    • Review what you have learnt from your own studies and, then write down your career objective for the next five years.
  • 26.  
  • 27. Vroom’s Expectancy Theory of Motivation Motivational Force Expectancy An individual’s expectation that he/she can perform a certain task to a certain standard Instrumentality How instrumental achieving this standard will be in leading to a specific outcome Valence How much value the individual attaches to the specific outcome in question
  • 28. Vroom’s theory in practice
    • Assume you are employed by an organisation in a temporary capacity.
    •  
    • You are hoping that they will offer you a permanent job, because you have been unemployed for the past six months. The job requires you to generate a lot of activity reports on Excel spreadsheets. The manager of the department where you are working is very fussy about accurate reports being submitted on time. You have heard that the last permanent person who was employed left because she was unable to cope with the pressure. This concerns you because your Excel computer skills are quite weak. In this scenario you have a low expectation that putting more effort into your work will lead to the required standard of performance.
    •  
    • Applying Vroom’s theory to this analogy:
    • The maximum for Expectancy is 1.00 (possible scores range from 0.00 to 1.00). A realistic score for you is 0.25 because of your weak Excel skills.
    • You do, however, know that doing this work well will play a very important role in you being appointed full time. Therefore you score 0.9 for Instrumentality .
    • Valence (the real need ), carries a value between 0 (a negative feeling) and 100. You are desperate for the job and thus score 100 for Valence .
    • The final score arrived at by multiplying Expectancy by Instrumentality and then by Valence is 22.5 (0.25 x 0.9 x 100).
    •  
  • 29.
    • Your Motivational Force is low ! This is because as ‘motivated’ as you are to get the job, knowing that you lack sufficient skill in a critical part of the job i.e. the accurate spreadsheets, makes you less ‘expectant’ and thus less ‘motivated’ to put in the extra effort! If you had no experience of Excel whatsoever, your Expectancy score might even be zero! In this case your Motivational Force score will be 0 (since anything multiplied by a zero = zero) and you are unlikely to put in any extra effort.
    • Of course if you have a strong sense of self-belief, you may well take a crash course in Excel while temping. This might increase your Expectancy score to as high as .90, and suddenly your Motivational Force stands at a high score of 81!
  • 30. 2.2 Compare the two researched theories of motivation
  • 31. 2.3 Apply the researched theories to a team and decide which best applies to a specific team
  • 32. The realities of working at McDonald’s – posted by employees
    • “ Hi! My name is Chris - my story isn't that of horror, but rather the opposite. I love my job. I'm 21 and I have come to realise that if you are going to have a job the rest of your life, it needs to be something you truly love. That is my thought about life in general. If you're going to do something, and you're going to do it the rest of your life, you MUST have a passion for it. I have that passion for McDonald's!
    • I hadn't intended on making a career out of McDonald's, but I truly hope to make it a career until I retire as at least an Owner Operator.”
  • 33. The realities of working at McDonald’s – posted by employees
    • “ I work at a McDonald’s in Sydney, Australia. The managers have to be the best McDonald’s managers ever. They work ten times harder than any of the crew, sorting out problems, filling in where help is most needed, and almost never retreating to their office. They work themselves to their limit - I think they're great and I have a high respect for them. Our uniforms are washed, dried and pressed and waiting for us when we get to work. My store owner is respected by the crew because of his authority and he has created one of the best McDonald’s stores in NSW.
    • We win awards because we are disciplined. We are committed to health, safety, great service and teamwork. Sound idealistic? It may be, but it's possible. I know; I see it every time I go in to work.”
  • 34. The realities of working at McDonald’s – posted by employees
    • “ I am a teenager aged 16, currently a crew member at McDonald’s in California. We were sent to the best McDonald’s in our city. We were taught the grill(cooking food and making it), team service(how to communicate, register, dealing with costumers), and we were taught drive-thru. My friend and I loved training because we only worked 3 hour days and were working with one of the best management teams McDonald’s has ever put together. It was really fun for us and we loved it.
    • Boy did they fool us -they made us think that’s how ALL the McDonald’s
  • 35. The realities of working at McDonald’s – posted by employees
    • McDonald’s is all about getting your food fast! And that’s all they really care about is getting the food out fast and having good drive-thru times.
    • McDonald’s is a horrible company that care nothing about there employees and who is apart of stores management. One word of advice – don’t apply for a job at McDonald’s - it is miserable. The people are a bunch of losers!”
  • 36. The realities of working at McDonald’s
    • If we review the comments made in situations 1 and 2, we see:
      • high levels of motivation, passion, enthusiasm, opportunities for career growth, respect, self-discipline, customer service orientation, job security, teamwork and commitment to McDonald’s values
    • If, however, we review the comment made in situations 3 and 4, we see:
      • potentially high turnover rates, a corporate culture and systems that are rigidly imposed, no opportunity to use initiative and a lack of caring for employees.
  • 37. Activity 5
    • Review situation # 1 and decide:
      • which theory you will apply in this instance
      • what your reasons are for choosing this theory
    • Do the same for situations 2, 3 and 4.
  • 38. Case study to illustrate Maslow’s Hierarchy
    • The company had won a new export contract and was able to offer you a permanent job. You continued to work hard and are eager to learn new skills.
    • After six months the foreman calls you into the office and informs you that you have been nominated to attend a training course for team leaders. This fulfils your need for recognition and status – after only six months you have been identified as having leadership potential! You feel grateful to the organisation for giving you this opportunity and are motivated to prove to them that their confidence is not misplaced by putting even more effort into your work.
    • ASSUME THIS SCENARIO APPLIES EQUALLY TO THE WHOLE TEAM.
  • 39. Case Study to illustrate Vroom’s Expectancy Model
    • You are employed in a temporary capacity and are hoping that the organisation will offer you a permanent job.
    • The job requires you to generate a lot of activity reports on Excel spreadsheets and you have heard that the last permanent person who was employed left because she was unable to cope with the pressure. This concerns you because your Excel computer skills are quite weak. In this scenario you have a low expectation that putting more effort into your work will lead to the required standard of performance.
    • Because of this your expectancy score is only 0.25; even though you know that doing this work well will play an important role in the appointment i.e. a high score for instrumentality and that you are desperate for the job (scoring 100 for valence) .
    • Your motivational force is, therefore, low and something needs to change to get you motivated.
    • ASSUME THIS SCENARIO APPLIES EQUALLY TO THE WHOLE TEAM.
  • 40. Activity 6
    • Review the following extracts from the two Case Studies used to illustrate the two theories.
    • Make a copy of the Action Plan and then enter what you think are realistic actions, who is responsible and what are realistic due dates for each action.
  • 41.  
  • 42. Activity 7
    • Review the example that follows and draw up your own self-development plan for next year.
    • Explain why this will motivate you (referring to a specific theory)
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45. 3. DESCRIBE TECHNIQUES LEADERS CAN USE TO MOTIVATE A TEAM
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • explain the importance of information as a motivating factor with reference to the effect of too much or too little information on a team
      • explain the importance of recognition as a motivating factor
      • discuss how achievement is recognised within a team, group, business unit or organisation
      • discuss the importance of listening as a motivating factor
      • discuss the consequences when a team or group leader does not listen to the team or individual members of the group
      • discuss ways of involving members in decision-making, as a means of obtaining commitment to a plan
  • 46. 3.1 Explain the importance of information as a motivating factor with reference to the effect of too much or too little information on a team
    • If we ensure that ‘SMART’ objectives, realistic standards and a performance plan with clearly-defined targets are clearly communicated to a team (as discussed in Module 2), then we have a strong foundation for gaining the commitment of team members.
    • Team members are much more likely to enthusiastically support and implement decisions where they have been fully informed.
    • However, well-communicated objectives, standards and targets are not sufficient on their own to ensure team commitment – we need practical information tools ! The most effective of these are:
      • the use of visual management
      • team review meetings
  • 47. 3.1.1 Using visual management to provide ‘real time’ information
  • 48. 3.1.2 Using team review meetings to provide information
    • Effective meetings are an essential aspect of business and the many good reasons for holding meetings include:
      • to gather and share information
      • to solve problems and make decisions
      • to plan future actions and review progress on past actions
      • to provide feedback on performance
      • to motivate and inspire team members
  • 49. Team review meetings
  • 50. 3.2 Explain the importance of recognition as a motivating factor Recognition
    • Non-financial
    • Provide opportunities for personal growth
    • Offer more job responsibility
    • Allow more participation in decision making
    • Create opportunities for job enrichment
    • Change the job title
    • Allow extra time off
    • Financial
    • Award a high merit increase in salary
    • Offer performance bonuses
    • Offer share options
    • Implement a Suggestion Scheme
    • Offer free trips or entertainment
  • 51. 3.3 Discuss how achievement is recognised within a team, group, business unit or organisation Employee of the Month Awards : Team members vote on who has made the biggest contribution to team success. Each recipient is presented with a special badge and has their photo prominently displayed in the workplace. This is particularly effective in a team dealing with customers who often add their own congratulations, thus increasing the person’s feeling of achievement. This is an example of short-term recognition . At the end of the month team members vote again on who will be next month’s award recipient.
  • 52. 3.3 Discuss how achievement is recognised within a team, group, business unit or organisation Status Awards : Executive Management decide on specific criteria for awarding team members a certain status in recognition of their contribution. The celebration is normally in the form of a formal function at which recipients receive a trophy or framed certificate. The awards are publicized throughout the organisation. This is an example of long-term recognition . The status award is kept by the individual for ever. For example, Pam Golding Properties, one of the largest property groups in South Africa has ‘Gold Club Awards’ for their agents “ who have achieved and maintained a consistently high level of excellent service and have adhered to the strictest principles of ethical conduct. ”
  • 53. Activity 8
    • Find out how recognition is celebrated at YOUR FET College.
    • Choose 1 of the awards and then explain why this will motivate the person receiving it
  • 54. 3.4 Discuss the importance of listening as a motivating factor
    • Activity listening
      • restate what we have heard the other person saying. This gives them the opportunity to make sure that what we have understood exactly what they have meant in their communication
      • make notes during the discussion. This consists simply of making notes about specific comments and actions. By doing this, the team leader gives the team member concerned the clear ‘signal’ that what they are saying is important . (If we feel that someone believes what we are saying is ‘important’ it will certainly motivate us!)
    • Stop-Start-Continue
  • 55. Activity 9
    • W orking on your OWN, review your personal ‘SWOT’ Analysis that you developed in activity 13 at the end of Module 2 and then write down selected strengths and development areas in the spaces provided.
    • Alongside each of these write in the actions you need to undertake in order to help you with the journey of personal growth.
    • In a Team of NO MORE THAN SIX PEOPLE, share your strengths and development needs.
    • Complete your sharing and then ask other team members for feedback on what they think you should:
      • continue to do e.g. “To continue showing concern for my friends and colleagues and being a good listener”
      • stop e.g. “To stop procrastinating before taking difficult decisions”
      • start e.g. “To start asking for help when I can’t solve a problem, instead of battling on my own because I’m too proud”.
  • 56.  
  • 57. 3.5 Discuss the consequences when a team leader does not listen to the team or individual members of the group
    • Some of the consequences of the team leader not really listening are:
      • poor productivity
      • de-motivation
      • financial loss
      • missed opportunities
      • undermining of management authority
      • team leaders who are poor listeners become even more ineffective
  • 58. 3.6 Discuss ways of involving team members in decision-making, as a means of obtaining commitment to a plan
    • Why involving teams members creates commitment
    • Green Areas
  • 59. The factory production line
    • There are fifteen employees working on a line bottling soft drinks. They each perform their designated job of operating machinery, packing and stacking. Life goes on as each employee performs his or her individual job function to best of his or her ability. However there are no real benefits of teamwork that emerge! If, however, the team leader allows the fifteen employees to become involved in making production process decisions, then things change. Because they are part of the decision, they
    • receive direct recognition for any productivity improvements
    • are given daily feedback on their achievements
    • are kept informed of how their line contributes to organisational success.
    • They have, in effect, been put in charge of improving quality and efficiency – it is no longer the responsibility of ‘management’ at the top of the organisational hierarchy!
  • 60. Green areas
    • In the ‘Green Area’ model:
      • work teams meet at the beginning of each workday to discuss work-related issues (performance, quality, training, safety, company news etc.)
      • the area itself is clearly demarcated (painted green – hence the name!) and close to the workplace where the team members can sit and meet
      • the primary intention is to create opportunities for employee participation in decisions affecting their own work and thus improve performance
      • it provides a platform for communicating very directly and very rapidly to management about work-related issues. The same applies to communication from management to these employees
      • because team members genuinely participate in decisions affecting their work-life, a feeling of ‘ownership’ is created. They become more and more committed to improvement as they view their actions as being in their own interest
      • no more than ten minutes of the official workday or shift is used up for this meeting. In fact, experience has shown that, since attendance is mandatory, employees are more inclined to not be late for the start of their shift
  • 61. 4. PROVIDE FEEDBACK TO A TEAM
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • identify information that a team requires to do its work well
      • convey to team members information required for them to work well
      • design an exercise to encourage team members to reflect on the team’s performance
      • use the exercise designed above, with a group to agree on performance targets
      • discuss ways of measuring performance, apart from formal performance management, with reference to the performance of a specific team
      • discuss actions that a leader can take to improve the ways in which team members measure their own performance, referring to a specific team
      • design a management process that makes provision for feedback from team members to the manager, for a specific business unit or team.
  • 62. Identify information that a team requires to do its work well
    • What are the organisation’s strategies?
    • What are the boundaries within which they must perform their work (e.g. code of conduct and conditions of employment)?
    • What are the team’s strengths and weaknesses?
    • What are the team’s performance objectives and standards?
    • How do their objectives and standards support the strategy?
    • What competencies does each team member possess?
    • What resources (financial and other) are available to achieve objectives?
  • 63. The factors required by a team for it to perform as its best
  • 64. 4.2 Convey to team members information that is required for them to work well
  • 65. 4.2 Convey to team members information that is required for them to work well
    • McDonald’s
      • created a company-wide portal to enhance internal communications
      • started to integrate their communication processes, including LANs, WANs, and the EDI
      • set up official internal blogs to allow employees to begin online discussions on a variety of topics, including new McDonald's products, promotions and operations, as well as general issues
  • 66. 4.3 Design an exercise to encourage team members to reflect on the team’s performance
    • Immediate reflection and feedback on performance ensures that:
      • substandard performance doesn’t become a poor work habit
      • performance standards that have been too difficult can be adjusted
      • short-term action plans for improving performance are developed
      • motivation is maintained
  • 67. Reflection and feedback process
    • Past experience
    • Team performance
    • Targets met
    • Problems
    • Concerns
    2. Reflect What worked? What went wrong What did we learn 3. Provide feedback What can be done? Who should do what? By what date 4. Take action Make it happen Allocate responsibilities Meet deadlines Performance improvement
  • 68. Activity 10
    • Place yourself in the position of Cyril Meyer the franchise holder of a McDonald’s restaurant who has to ensure that his team agree on the performance target of “customers not to wait for service for longer than 80 seconds after arriving at the service counter.” (the McDonald’s standard is 75 seconds and your restaurant has averaged 85 seconds over the past year. This has improved from 90 seconds after initial training).
    • Review the purpose of the discussion with no more than eight of your fellow students who should each play the role of a team member at the restaurant.
    • Reflect on the reasons for the past performance compared to the McDonald’s standard and seek reasons for variances.
    • Ask for feedback on reasons for any variance and discuss any problems that prevented the team from meeting standards and ideas for improving performance.
    • Develop an Action Plan to improve from 85 to 80 seconds.
  • 69. 4.5 Discuss ways of measuring performance, apart from formal performance management, with reference to the performance of a specific team
    • Throughout this module, we have used visual management and team meetings as mechanisms to both inform and to motivate team members
    • ‘ Green Areas’ combine both these mechanisms to constantly measure performance by providing:
      • consistent ‘real time’ measurement of performance
      • information in a clear format that compares actual with standard
      • individual performance e.g. attendance and awards
      • team performance e.g. output, quality and costs per unit
  • 70. Performance measurement in the workplace Hourly water usage: Kitchen 08h00 600 l 09h00 900 l 10h00 850 l 11h00 700 l 12h00 1200 l 13h00 1400 l
  • 71. 4.6 Discuss actions that a leader can take to improve the ways in which team members measure their own performance, with reference to a specific team
    • Green Areas are a way of empowering teams to participate in decisions affecting their performance, they provide the best example of how a specific team can take ‘ownership’ of measuring their own performance.
    • This model also provides a platform for communicating very directly and very rapidly to management about work-related issues.
  • 72. Communication and feedback used in Green Areas CEO communicates message to Executive Team – Monday 08:00 Regional Vice President communicates CEO’s message to Management Team – Monday 10:00 Regional Managers communicate CEO’s message to Middle Managers – Monday 12:00 Middle Managers communicate CEO’s message to Team Leaders – Monday 16:00 Team Leaders communicate CEO’s message to crew members Team Leaders – Monday 16:00 Crew members give immediate FEEDBACK to Team Leader on their reaction to CEO’s message Wed 08:00 Feedback to CEO Tue 16:00 Feedback to Vice President Tue 12:00 Feedback to Regional Manager Tue 10:00 Feedback to Middle Manager Wed 08:00 Feedback to CEO
  • 73. 5. RECOGNISE ACHIEVEMENT
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • explain, with examples, the importance of praise and personal recognition
      • explain possible systems for recognising achievement at team level
      • devise a personal plan to show recognition in your own team
      • analyse tasks allocated to the team
      • suggest how individual team members can be given responsibility for their own achievement.
  • 74. 5.1 Explain, with examples, the importance of praise and personal recognition
    • Praise and personal recognition MUST:
      • be sincere and related to value-adding contributions only
      • convey a message that says; ‘you and the work that you do are both important enough for me to take the time to provide feedback on how I view your contribution’
      • be specific – if not, then its effectiveness in reinforcing good performance will be very limited (thanking team members in broad terms for their loyalty and commitment has very limited impact)
      • be based on specific recorded incidents that illustrate the positive behaviour. If not – the praise may be viewed as insincere
  • 75. 5.1 Explain, with examples, the importance of praise and personal recognition
    • Praise and personal recognition MAY:
      • be handled one-on-one, for example: “Sipho, I have called you in to thank you for working overtime on Tuesday … This demonstrates your commitment and I’ll make a note of it and place it in your Personal File”
      • be given in a team situation, for example: “ Guys, I want to thank Sipho for stepping in last Tuesday when Kobus was off sick. He really helped us meet our targets. Sipho, you set an example for all of us – thanks a lot!”
      • take many forms. It may be as simple as feedback on a specific task or may be a complex scheme that offers incentive bonuses.
  • 76. 5.1 Explain, with examples, the importance of praise and personal recognition
    • Praise and personal recognition SHOULD:
      • provide a foundation for personal growth
      • be maintained and updated with fresh ideas to make it effective
      • adhere to the form of recognition prescribed by the organisation’s code of conduct (e.g. no financial forms of recognition allowed)
      • be formalised to become part of the team member’s performance record
  • 77. 5.2 Explain possible systems for recognising achievement at team level
    • What form should recognition take?
      • Free tickets
      • Time on full pay
      • Job shadowing
  • 78. Activity 11
    •   If you were a McDonald’s crew member what would be the best form of recognition? Rank the factors listed one the next slide in order of importance.
  • 79.  
  • 80. 5.2 Explain possible systems for recognising achievement at team level
    • What should the process be?
      • Management decide on a specific criteria for awarding team members a certain status in recognition of their contribution
      • Team Leader observes team members performing in the workplace and rates them according to criteria
      • Team Leader ranks team members and determines the ‘award winner’
  • 81. Employee reward scores
  • 82. Activity 12
    • Review the top three factors you chose in Activity 11, then use the process in exhibit 23 to draw up a programme for recognising achievement for final year college students.
  • 83. 5.4 Analyse tasks allocated to the team
    • To effectively analyse the tasks allocated to the team requires a systematic job analysis
    • Job analysis is based on the following principles:
      • Only if there is complete and accurate information about the specific activities and tasks of a job can it be properly analysed
      • Analyse the job and NOT the person
      • Analyse the current job – not what it could look like in the future
      • Analyse the whole job and its links with other jobs and how it contributes to the success of the organisation
  • 84. 5.4 Analyse tasks allocated to the team
    • Job analysis uses the following:
      • individual interviews
      • observation
      • structured questionnaires
      • log books
      • diary of activities
      • checklists
  • 85. 5.5 Suggest how individual team members can be given responsibility for their own achievement
    • Responsibility is the obligation of the individual to make decisions and take actions to ensure that tasks are performed effectively
    • Authority is the right of the individual to make these decisions and to take action, and
    • Accountability is being answerable for the results of the decisions and actions taken
  • 86. 6. INDICATE HOW LEADERS CAN EMPOWER MEMBERS OF A TEAM
    • After completing this outcome, you will be able to :
      • analyse aspects of team performance that are supervised by junior managers
      • indicate which aspects of team performance could better be handled by the team rather than by junior managers
  • 87. ‘ Plan to win’ elements that could be delegated to team members
  • 88. Activity 13
    • Make a copy of the matrix that follows and then, on your OWN, answer the questions by ticking (  ) the box of your choice.
    • In a TEAM of between 4 to 7 people, reach consensus as a team.
    • Be prepared to present your team answer and reasons to your class
  • 89.  
  • 90. Individual vs team decisions