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NCV 2 Business Practice Hands-On Support - Module 4
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NCV 2 Business Practice Hands-On Support - Module 4

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This slide show complements our existing learner guide - NCV 2 Business Practice Hands-On Training published by Future Managers Pty Ltd. For more information visit our website - www.futuremanagers.net

This slide show complements our existing learner guide - NCV 2 Business Practice Hands-On Training published by Future Managers Pty Ltd. For more information visit our website - www.futuremanagers.net

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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  • 1. Business Practice 2 Module 4
  • 2. Organise yourself in the workplace
  • 3. Outcomes After completing this module, you will be able to: • Maintain personal hygiene, grooming and dress code • Know how to interact with people when absent due to illness • Identify possible unforeseen circumstances to plan alternative action in advance • Evaluate own skills and areas for development • Set measurable, achievable objectives for own skills development • Prioritise objectives and plan activities for personal skills development
  • 4. Maintain personal hygiene, grooming and dress code After completing this module, you will be able to: • Understand the importance of a professional appearance in the workplace • Maintain personal hygiene, grooming and dress code in a work environment • Understand the importance of workplace cleanliness and personal hygiene.
  • 5. Examples of poor personal grooming • Hands with chewed or badly cut fingernails. • A beard or moustache that is not kept tidy and neatly trimmed. • Uncombed hair looking like a bird’s nest, although it seems to be fashionable to have uncombed hair these days! • Inappropriate make-up could make a woman look less attractive or unprofessional. • A person may look very ‘scruffy’ if he or she does not take pride in how they dress.
  • 6. Interaction with people when absent due to illness After completing this outcome, you will be able to: 1. Given a range of illness (contagious diseases or virus infections, such as flu, chicken pox, measles and so on), decide whether to interact with people 2. Follow company procedure (report absence, obtain doctor’s certificate, complete leave form) when absent due to illness
  • 7. Interaction between people who are ill • Do you go home if you have a cold or flu? • Do you feel under pressure to attend work / college if you are ill? • How do you react to sharing the room with someone who is ill? • Do you know which illnesses require isolations? • Should a sick person be at college? • At what point do you decide to stay at home and get better
  • 8. Sick Leave • Report your absence • Obtain a doctor’s certificate • Complete a leave form
  • 9. Evaluate own skills and areas for development After completing this outcome, you will be able to: 1. Evaluate your own skills and areas for development on current work requirements. 2. Evaluate likely future work requirements to identify needs for skills development.
  • 10. Functions in a business • Marketing and sales • Finance and administration • Human resources • Management information systems • Production • Purchasing • Distribution • General management
  • 11. Personal job description • The job title • Who the person reports to • Who the person has to work with • The objectives or results to be achieved in the job • The main duties or tasks in the job • The resources (equipment, money, stock and so on) for which the person is responsible • The physical working conditions of the job • The types of decisions to be made
  • 12. Job specification • Experience needed to do the job • Education qualification necessary for the job • The type of personality needed to succeed in the job • Skills and knowledge needed • Physical attributes, such as strength
  • 13. Assessing work performance • Take the following three factors into account: – You need to know what to do – You need to know how to do the job – You need to have a willingness to do the job.
  • 14. Evaluation of Performance
  • 15. Meetings with supervisors • How was your performance in the past six to 12 months? What results did you achieve? • How is your present performance? How well are you doing now? • What must you achieve in the next six to 12 months? What will be changing in your job and what should your results be? What training do you need?
  • 16. Performance review meetings • The performance that is being measured. • Your view of your performance. • How (and why) you think the job has changed over the review period. • Factors, both positive and negative, you think affect your performance. • Ideas on how to improve your performance. • How your supervisor contributes to your performance. • How you influence other people’s performance. • Likely future changes in your job. • Growth and promotion prospects in the business. What job would you like to be doing in 3 years’ time? How are you going to get there? What skills will you need to acquire? • What development activities you need. What does your organisation provide? • What do you do well in your job? (These are your strengths). • What could you do better in your job? (These are ‘areas for improvement’ in your job performance).
  • 17. Career development • The final responsibility for career development rests with you! • You must think very carefully about your career ambitions, because self-development happens over a period of time. • Many organisations have a culture of learning, where they encourage employees to learn and improve their own skills
  • 18. Set measurable, achievable objectives for own skills development After completing this outcome, you will be able to: 1. Set measurable, achievable objectives for own skills development
  • 19. Setting objectives • Your short term objective may be completing your studies • Longer term, you would look to find a job • You will continue to learn in your job • When you plan training, you need to enhance your own skills at the same time benefiting the organisation • Develop a time line to address both your own and your job’s needs. • The human resources staff can also help with this process since they are aware of the training and development activities available • The training department will select appropriate training providers
  • 20. Specific Objectives • What course will I study? • Where will you study? • What subjects/unit standards will I take each year? • How much will it cost? • When do I start learning and how much time must I spend on learning each day and month? • What may prevent me studying according to my plan? • How will I know that I am successful? • Whose help will I need and when?