Proactive presentation m_barajas_17-11
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  • I will present you a study conducted in the context of ProActive – Fostering Teachers’ creativity through GBL – LLP – KA3 coordinated by UB. It is implemented by 6 partners in 4 different countries The present study is related to the implementation of the project in Spanish schools . It is called…
  • consensus on the importance of creativity at all levels. Research around the topic “creativity” has started attracting interest in recent years: most creativity research concerns the nature of creative thinking, the distinctive characteristics of the creative person, the development of creativity along the individual lifespan and the social environments more strongly related to creative activities (Kerr & Gagliardi, 2003; Simonton, 2000). Council of 22 May 2008 on promoting creativity and innovation through education and training of the European Union
  • 2009 European Year Aim: to raise awareness of the importance of creativity and innovation for personal, social and economic development; to disseminate good practices; to stimulate education and research, and to promote policy debate on related issues. Proactive goal is to foster teachers’ creativity. -When studying the literature related to games, we noticed that GBL appears to be a good candidate to promote creative teaching, as... - However, some barriers were identified to... -...and assessment framework
  • Proactive goal is to foster teachers’ creativity. -When studying the literature related to games, we noticed that GBL appears to be a good candidate to promote creative teaching, as... - However, some barriers were identified to... -...and assessment framework
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers >> so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers >> so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers >> so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers >> so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers >> so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • As a solution to these barriers, ProActive proposes an approach in which teachers become game designers so they can use games made by themselves and that are tailored to their teaching context and students profiles They design their own GBL scenarios, i.e. an educational game embedded in well defined learning activities and contexts
  • we don’t learn in only one way , but in different ways that depend on personal aptitudes, on the learning situation and on the content to be learnt. eEery person is able to use a different combination of learning styles depending on the situation. Five learning metaphors model adopted in ProActive describes different ways of learning and is used as stimulus in the GBL design process.
  • Let’s now go back to the goal of this study, which was to evaluate the impact of the design and implementation of GBL on teachers’ creativity. How did we explore creativity in the proactive GBL practices? We looked at 3 different levels: The creative process of GBL design by teachers The creative GBL scenario created We studied the literature on creativity regarding these different levels
  • Let’s now go back to the goal of this study, which was to evaluate the impact of the design and implementation of GBL on teachers’ creativity. How did we explore creativity in the proactive GBL practices? We looked at 3 different levels: The creative process of GBL design by teachers The creative GBL scenario created We studied the literature on creativity regarding these different levels
  • FROM THE Guidelines for Creative Game-Based Learning Practices

Proactive presentation m_barajas_17-11 Proactive presentation m_barajas_17-11 Presentation Transcript

  • Mario Barajas University of Barcelona Two years of project PROACTIVE
  • INTRODUCTION
    • During the last decades, and specially during the last years, creativity has been seen to be increasingly significant in education . Currently, there is a consensus for creativity to be an important educational objective.
    • “ all levels of education and training can contribute to creativity and innovation in a lifelong learning perspective: the early stages of education concentrating on motivation, learning to learn skills and other key competences, and subsequent stages focusing on more specific skills and the creation, development and application of new knowledge and ideas”.
  • INTRODUCTION
    • 2009 European Year of Creativity and Innovation
    • European Parliament and the Council: “Europe needs innovation, and learning systems which inspire innovation”
    • creativity should be seen “as a driver for innovation and as a key factor for the development of personal, occupational, entrepreneurial and social competences”.
  • INTRODUCTION
      • The relationships between creativity and learning are based on the fact that there are basic skills and attitudes that can be fostered in educational settings as potential conditions/ agents of creativity
      • “ Education has the dual power to cultivate and to stifle creativity” (UNESCO, 1972)
  • GAMES, LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
    • Game-Based Learning show a clear relation between playing digital games and learning.
    • digital games as learning tools
      • can enhance students’ motivation towards learning
      • games can provide challenging experiences that promote the intrinsic satisfaction of the players, keeping them engaged and motivated
    • Moreover, players have fun while playing a game because they have to learn it (Prensky, 2001).
  • GAMES, LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
    • Video games as genuine learning environments:
    • • Active Learning
    • • Exploratory Learning
    • • Constructivist Learning
    • • Learning by doing
    • • Meta-cognitive skills
    • • Positive and negative reinforcement
    • • Problem-Based Learning (PBL)
    • • Situated Cognition
  • GAMES, LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
    • Video games promote active learning
    • To succeed, players take responsibility for learning and for applying new skills
    • Players learn by ‘doing’ and by improving their knowledge and skills
    • Players are involved in problem-solving activities
  • GAMES, LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
    • Video games promote exploratory learning
    • Video games reward players for their curiosity
    • In many games, exploration is the key to new discoveries and learning opportunities
    • Video games implement advanced modes of interaction with the environment
  • GAMES, LEARNING AND CREATIVITY
    • Video games promote meta-cognitive skills
    • Players become better at learning new skills
    • Players are provided with an environment that acts as a learning scaffolding just as the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’ defined by Vygotsky, whereby players become more independent in their learning activities
  • THE PROACTIVE PROJECT
      • LifeLong Learning programme
      • KA3: focused on ICT
      • January 2010 – December 2011
    • Aim: To foster teachers’ creativity through GBL
    • The teacher as game designer
  • THE PROACTIVE PARTNERSHIP
    • Universitat de Barcelona (coordinator) – Spain
    • Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma – Italy
    • CAST Ltd. – the UK
    • Università di Napoli – Italy
    • Universidad Complutense de Madrid – Spain
    • Universidad de Bucharest - Romani a
  • LEARNING METAPHORS
    • Acquisition refers to the transfer of information from one who possesses it (the teacher) to another
    • Imitation is when the learner observes and models the behavior / attitudes of an expert to learn a skill.
    • Experimentation closely relates to “learning by doing” processes and involves practical activities and skills.
    • Participation focuses on social aspects of learning activities
    • Discovery is when learners interact with mediating artifacts and combine previous knowledge, in order to create new ideas, models and concepts.
  • THE PROACTIVE PROJECT 1 Focus groups Co-design: ongoing collaboration process among teachers and researchers
      • Implementation
    2 3 4 Teacher training Evaluation 5
  • CO-DESIGN OF GBL SCENARIOS
    • Use of two game editors (EUTOPIA and <e-Adventure>)
    • Design of games and the corresponding learning scenario
    • Ongoing collaboration process among teachers and researchers
  • CO-DESIGN OF GBL SCENARIOS
    • More than 80 teachers, from schools, universities and vocational training have participated
    • 26 pilot sites in 4 different countries
    • 58 GBL scenarios (29 for schools, 15 for vocational training and 14 for universities)
  • PEOPLE and SCOPE
    • More than 80 teachers, from schools, universities and vocational training have participated
    • 26 pilot sites in 4 different countries
    • 58 GBL scenarios (29 for schools, 15 for vocational training and 14 for universities)
  • OUTCOMES : CREATIVE GBL IN SCHOOLS
    • Opportunities
    • Game design is fun
    • GBL engages
    • Collaborative game design is richer than individual
    • Game design is a new teaching methodology based on the
    • participation and the discovery metaphor
    • GBL enriches the role of teachers
    • GBL is a way to get closer to students
    • GBL stimulates self-regulation and learning by doing
    • GBL encourages collaboration among students
    • GBL helps improve schools’ visibility
  • OUTCOMES : CREATIVE GBL IN SCHOOLS
    • CHALLENGES
    • GBL design requires training and support
    • GBL design requires a big time investment
    • Technical challenges
  • PRODUCTS
    • Psychopedagogical Framework for Fostering Creativity
    • Handbook for the Production of Creative GBL Scenarios
    • Guidelines for Creative Game-Based Learning Practices
    • Adapted release of Eutopia and eAdventure Game editors
    • Collection of Templates and libraries
    • Repository of GBL Scenarios
    • Proceedings of the PROACTIVE Conference
    • Etc…
  • Thanks for you attention. Mario Barajas University of Barcelona [email_address] http://www.proactive-project.eu