Bold City 3.0 - City Cycling 2030

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A presentation by Gain Jennings on the geographical and population characteristics required to achieve accessibility in city cycling.

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Bold City 3.0 - City Cycling 2030

  1. 1. CYCLING in SOUTH AFRICAN CITIES: 2030 Gail Jennings Bold City: Future of Transport 2013 to 2030 GAIL JENNINGS
  2. 2. GAIL JENNINGS
  3. 3. Discussion • What do we think our network should look like in 2013? • How have bicycle-friendly cities developed? • How do we think we should get there? • What do local planning authorities envision? • Can we get there from here? GAIL JENNINGS
  4. 4. INTERNATIONAL CYCLE-‟FRIENDLY‟ CITIES • Dense, compact • Flat topography • Central city areas of less than 5km across, one can easily ride from one end to the other in 30 minutes • Helmets not compulsory • Integration with public transport GAIL JENNINGS
  5. 5. INTERNATIONAL CYCLE-‟FRIENDLY‟ CITIES (2) • Low car ownership, cars expensive to buy and run, high taxes • Congestion, difficult to get around • Slow speed limits • Cycling is almost always faster, cheaper and more convenient for trips within the central city. • Equitable societies (less focus on social status) GAIL JENNINGS
  6. 6. INTERNATIONAL CYCLE-‟FRIENDLY‟ CITIES (3) Cycling is not „cool‟ but mainstream: people are not „cyclists‟ but pragmatic multi-modalists who have access to a variety of options and who live in a context in which cycling makes sense for a large percentage of those trips GAIL JENNINGS
  7. 7. NATIONAL NMT POLICY (DRAFT 2008) VISION Non-Motorised Transport will be a sustainable and stimulant mode of transport for social and economic development within an integrated efficient transport system. MISSION The mobility needs of marginalised communities and NMT users shall be met through the provision of a safe, secure, and reliable transport system. GAIL JENNINGS
  8. 8. NATIONAL NMT POLICY (2008): OBJECTIVES (1) • Integration of NMT into the transport system including transport and spatial planning • Endorsement and facilitation of the use of NMT modes • Development of infrastructure and maintenance standards that recognise NMT as an essential mode of transport • Enhancement of traffic legislation that recognises NMT as an alternative transport mode • Facilitation of NMT as a feeder system to other modes of transport GAIL JENNINGS
  9. 9. NATIONAL NMT POLICY (2008): OBJECTIVES (2) • Empowerment of marginalised groups through promotion of SMMEs through NMT; • Allocation of adequate and sustainable funding for promotion and development of NMT; • Promotion of NMT as reliable, healthy, affordable, accessible and safe transport mode; • Reduction of the number of traffic fatalities of vulnerable non-motorised road users; • Facilitation of research and new initiatives to improve NMT performance. GAIL JENNINGS
  10. 10. CoCT NMT POLICY (2005) “Cape Town will be a city where all people feel safe and secure to walk and cycle, NMT is part of the transport system, public space is shared between all users and everyone has access to urban opportunities and mobility.” “Increase cycling and encourage walking by creating a safe and pleasant bicycle and pedestrian network of paths to serve all the citizens in the Cape Town Area.” GAIL JENNINGS
  11. 11. CoJ NMT FRAMEWORK (2009) • To establish a dedicated network of high quality pedestrian and cycling routes across the City • To establish pedestrian and cycling modes of transport as preferred modes for short distance and 
convenience related trips within the City • To increase the percentage modal split of cycling and walking as preferred modes of transport for travel 
to work and school trips GAIL JENNINGS
  12. 12. CoJ NMT FRAMEWORK (2009) (2) • To increase the percentage modal split of cycling and walking as preferred modes of transport for travel 
to work and school trips • To facilitate access to the City for marginalised and low income communities • To integrate NMT modes with other strategic public transportation initiatives within the City in order to enhance local feeder services and support the 
successful functioning and take up of public transport • To promote increased access to educational institutions by NMT modes. GAIL JENNINGS
  13. 13. CoE NMT VISION (2012) EMM will be a people-friendly Metropolitan Municipality where all users feel safe to walk and cycle. Facilities within EMM will be accessible to all users including nonmotorised transport users. • To promote NMT as a key mode of transport; • To integrate NMT and public transport; • To ensure the safe movement of pedestrians and cyclists. 
 GAIL JENNINGS
  14. 14. RLM NMT VISION (2013) (DRAFT) Rustenburg is a permeable city in which NMT is a safe, enjoyable and respected mode of transport, with a network of useful, direct, continuous, integrated routes. RLM will create an environment that stimulates, enables and supports the increased use of NMT through a range of policies, strategies and practices that pay attention to the entire non-motorised travel chain: from leaving home, route planning and making the journey, to connecting and integrating with other transport modes and trip-end facilities and amenities. GAIL 
 JENNINGS
  15. 15. Discussion • What do we think our network should look like in 2013? • How have bicycle-friendly cities developed? • How do we think we should get there? • What do local planning authorities envision? • Can we get there from here? GAIL JENNINGS
  16. 16. Thank you gail@gailjennings.co.za 083 658 5386 © 2013, @gailjennings. All information used in this presentation are copyright protected and may not be reproduced or quoted without the written permission of the author.

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