Learning Outcomes
Online Teaching
Learning Outcomes at Franciscan University
• CORE Goals
• As a university, Franciscan University of Steubenville has
commi...
Online Learning in the 21st Century
• Digital natives – grown up with computers, Internet etc.
• Digital immigrants – not ...
Asynchronous Learning
• Synchronous: things happening at the same time (onsite courses).
• Asynchronous: things are happen...
Orientation: Online Teaching and Learning
• Differences between online teaching and learning:
• Absence of physical space....
Online Course Delivery
• A Learning Management System (LMS) is a program used to
create and manage an online course – e.g....
Screenshot of Blackboard
Features of an LMS
Feature

Content

Start Here

Welcome page

Course Information

Course Information Sheet, Syllabus – co...
Advanced Features of an LMS
• Blog – an online journal that enables the teacher and students
to post commentary on course ...
Course Design Checklist
• 1.1 Course material is sufficient and directly related to learning
outcomes
• 1.3 Learning outco...
Practical Considerations
• Teacher time management:
• Course design is ideally complete prior to course beginning.
• Takes...
References
• Vai, M., & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of Online Course
Design: A Standards-Based Guide. Taylor & Francis...
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Learning outcomes

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Learning outcomes

  1. 1. Learning Outcomes Online Teaching
  2. 2. Learning Outcomes at Franciscan University • CORE Goals • As a university, Franciscan University of Steubenville has committed to the following four CORE goals for the undergraduate program core curriculum: • Evaluate their place in the world in relationship to the natural world, to human society, and to God. • Communicate effectively. • Demonstrate their knowledge-based values and an understanding of their Christian vocation through service. • Reflect on the relationship between faith and reason. • Program Goals • Program goals are constructed by faculty of the departments and are specific to program of study, these goals can be evaluated through the course assessments. These are required for all courses.
  3. 3. Online Learning in the 21st Century • Digital natives – grown up with computers, Internet etc. • Digital immigrants – not raised with technology. • Ensure that the course provides clear and engaging material in online learning for students from all backgrounds. (Vai & Sosulski, 2011)
  4. 4. Asynchronous Learning • Synchronous: things happening at the same time (onsite courses). • Asynchronous: things are happening at different times (online courses). • Blended learning: combination of any two - asynchronous online, synchronous online, or onsite learning. • Asynchronous learning is more flexible since the class is not fixed within a set time period. • Convenience: Teachers and learners are busy with full schedules, a career and can participate when convenient with online courses. • Offers flexibility of: • • • • Time - any time within fixed time periods. Place – Internet + portable downloadable sections. Pace – learners move at their own pace. Participation – no pressure to respond immediately, time for reflection available to evaluate and re-evaluate. (Vai & Sosulski, 2011)
  5. 5. Orientation: Online Teaching and Learning • Differences between online teaching and learning: • Absence of physical space. • All planning and preparing content takes place before course begins • Communicating online vs. in-person: non-verbal communication in class translates to tone of writing, written encouragement, audio/video, email, phone. • Delayed feedback since the course is asynchronous, provide • • • • • clear, straight forward writing style, provide resources, anticipate questions. Visual design, keep it simple, organized, clean, images, restating, providing examples. Flexibility with deadlines to provide structure. Time online as a teacher, have to adjust how time is used (preparation, class-time, commuting, feedback, regular online presence etc.), as a student, equal time as an onsite class. Online class participation vs. attending class. Office hours should be substituted by phone, text/video/chat, one-onone phone/real-time meetings. (Vai & Sosulski, 2011)
  6. 6. Online Course Delivery • A Learning Management System (LMS) is a program used to create and manage an online course – e.g. Blackboard • A course-designer must be computer literate to build an online course. • More importantly, an onsite course content must be redesigned for effective online teaching and learning. (Vai & Sosulski, 2011)
  7. 7. Screenshot of Blackboard
  8. 8. Features of an LMS Feature Content Start Here Welcome page Course Information Course Information Sheet, Syllabus – course structure and expectations, clear deadlines structuring the course Faculty Information Bio, Contact Information, Office Hours Learning Sessions Course Content and Assignments – replace lectures, discussions, activities, usually packaged by unit or by week, includes materials students need to review Discussions Academic Discussion Board – participate in online course discussion, usually initiated by instructor Course Lounge Student-student and student-teacher discussion space View Announcements Updates and reminders – may be linked to Welcome Page Send Email Correspondence between course members View Grades Enables teacher and students to review and track academic progress Academic Resources Resources for students e.g. ADA compliance, Library Information etc. Blackboard Help Student Blackboard help with basic functions
  9. 9. Advanced Features of an LMS • Blog – an online journal that enables the teacher and students to post commentary on course questions, topics, and projects. • Wiki – a communal space in which the teacher and the students are able to post and edit content in order to create a collaborative information resource – users add, edit and structure content. • Tests and Quizzes – assessment tools for creating online tests, either with computer-generated feedback or instructor feedback options. • Groups – teacher can assign students to different groups for discussions, assignments, or projects (Vai & Sosulski, 2011)
  10. 10. Course Design Checklist • 1.1 Course material is sufficient and directly related to learning outcomes • 1.3 Learning outcomes for an online course are identical to those of the onsite version
  11. 11. Practical Considerations • Teacher time management: • Course design is ideally complete prior to course beginning. • Takes more time the first time building a course. • Teaching courses again, only needs revising and updating. • Use clear language, easy access to material, consistency. • Teacher posts announcements, new learning material, new discussion topic etc. as needed. • Check-in on student interaction, participation, work: discussion board, blog, assignment. • Give feedback on assignments as frequently as an onsite course. • Class management: set up assignments, communication, reminders, grouping for projects.
  12. 12. References • Vai, M., & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide. Taylor & Francis.
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