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amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
amelia earhart syed
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amelia earhart syed

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  • 1. (1897-07-24)Jul yB n or 24, 1897 At chi son, Kansas, U .S. Jul y 2, 1937 (aged 39)D sappear ed i Paci f i c Ocean, en r out e t o H l and ow I sl and D ar ed dead i n ecl absent i aSt at us Januar y 5, 1939(1939-01-05) (aged 41)N i onal i t y at Am i can er Fi r st w an t o om f l y sol o acr ossK n f or now t he At l ant i c O cean and set t i ng m any avi at i on r ecor ds.Spouse G ge P. Put nam eorSi gnat ur e
  • 2. Amelia Mary Earhart /ˈ ɛərhɑrt/ AIR-hart; July , 1897 – disappeared ) was an Americanaviation pioneer andauthor. [1][N 1] Earhart wasthe first aviatrix to fly soloacross the Atlantic Ocean.
  • 3. She received the U.S. DistinguishedFlying Cross for this record.[4] She setmany other records,[2] wrote best-selling books about her flyingexperiences and was instrumental inthe formation of The Ninety-Nines, anorganization for female pilots.[5]Earhart joined the faculty of thePurdue University aviation departmentin 1935 as a visiting faculty member tocounsel women on careers and help
  • 4. During an attempt to make acircumnavigation flight of theglobe in 1937 in a Purdue-fundedLockheed Model 10 Electra,Earhart disappeared over thecentral Pacific Ocean nearHowland Island. Fascination withher life, career anddisappearance continues to thisday.
  • 5. ChildhoodAmeliaEarhart asa child
  • 6. Am i a M y Ear har t , daught er of G m el ar er anAm i can Sam er uel "Edw n" St ant on Ear har t (bor n iM ch 28, 1867) and Am i a "Am O i s Ear har t ar el y" t(1869–1962),[9] w bor n i n At chi son, Kansas, i n ast he hom of her m er nal gr andf at her , Al f r ed e atG deon O i s (1827–1912), a f or m f eder al i t erj udge, pr esi dent of t he At chi son Savi ngs Bankand a l eadi ng ci t i zen i n t he t ow Am i a w n. el ast he second chi l d of t he m r i age, af t er an ari nf ant st i l l bor n i n August 1896.[10] Al f r ed O i s thad not i ni t i al l y f avor ed t he m r i age and w ar asnot sat i sf i ed w t h Edw ns pr ogr ess as a i il aw .[11] yer
  • 7. Early flying experiencesAt about t hat t i m w t h a young w an f r i end, e, i omEar har t vi si t ed an ai r f ai r hel d i n conj unct i onw t h t he C i anadi an N i onal Exposi t i on i n Tor ont o. atO of t he hi ghl i ght s of t he day w a f l yi ng ne asexhi bi t i on put on by a W l d W I "ace."[33] The or arpi l ot over head spot t ed Ear har t and her f r i end, w how e w chi ng f r om an i sol at ed cl ear i ng and di ved er atat t hem "I am sur e he sai d t o hi m f , W ch m . sel at emake t hem scam ," she sai d. Ear har t st ood her pergr ound as t he ai r cr af t cam cl ose. "I di d not eunder st and i t at t he t i m she sai d, "but I e,"bel i eve t hat l i t t l e r ed ai r pl ane sai d som hi ng t o et [34]
  • 8. By 1919 Earhart prepared to enter Smith College butchanged her mind and enrolled at ColumbiaUniversity signing up for a course in medical studiesamong other programs. She quit a year later to bewith her parents who had reunited in California.L–R: Neta Snook and Amelia Earhart infront of Earharts Kinner Airster, c. 1921
  • 9. transatlantic flight Amelia Earhart being greeted by Mrs. Foster Welch, Mayor of Southampton, June 20, 1928 After Charles Lindberghs solo flight across the Atlantic in 1927, Amy Phipps Guest, (1873–1959), expressed interest in being the first woman to fly (or be flown) across the Atlantic Ocean. After deciding the trip was too perilous for her to undertake, she offered to sponsor the project, suggesting they find "another girl with the right image." While at work one afternoon in April 1928, Earhart got a phone call from Capt. Hilton H. Railey, who asked her, "Would you like to fly the Atlantic?"
  • 10. 1932 transatlantic solo flightAmelia Earhart Museum, Derry Lockheed Vega 5B flown by Amelia Earhart as seen on display at the National Air and Space Museum
  • 11. Depar t ur e f r om LaeO Jul y 2, 1937, m dni ght G T, Ear har t and N n i M oonant ook of f f r om Lae i n t he heavi l y l oaded El ect r a.Thei r i nt ended dest i nat i on w H l and I sl and, a as owf l at sl i ver of l and 6,500 f t (2,000 m l ong and )1,600 f t (500 m w de, 10 f t (3 m hi gh and 2,556 ) i )m l es (4,113 km aw i ) ay. Thei r l ast know posi t i on nr epor t w near t he N as ukum anu I sl ands, about 800m l es (1,300 km i nt o t he f l i ght . The U t ed St at es i ) niC oast G d cut t er I t asca w on st at i on at uar asH l and, assi gned t o com uni cat e w t h Ear har t s ow m iLockheed El ect r a 10E and gui de t hem t o t he i sl andonce t hey ar r i ved i n t he vi ci ni t y.
  • 12. Fi nal appr oach t o H l and I sl and owThr ough a ser i es of m sunder st andi ngs or ier r or s (t he det ai l s of w ch ar e st i l l hicont r over si al ), t he f i nal appr oach t oH l and I sl and usi ng r adi o navi gat i on w ow asnot successf ul . Fr ed N oonan had ear l i erw i t t en about pr obl em af f ect i ng t he r saccur acy of r adi o di r ect i on f i ndi ng i nnavi gat i on.[N 15] Som sour ces have not ed eEar har t s appar ent l ack of under st andi ngof her Bendi x di r ect i on-f i ndi ng l oopant enna, w ch at t he t i m w ver y new hi e ast echnol ogy.
  • 13. Anot her ci t ed cause of possi bl econf usi on w t hat t he U G as SCcut t er I t asca and Ear har t pl annedt hei r com uni cat i on schedul e musi ng t i m syst em set a hal f e shour apar t (w t h Ear har t usi ng iG eenw ch C vi l Ti m (G T) and r i i e Ct he I t asca under a N aval t i me ).zone desi gnat i on syst em [105]
  • 14. M i on pi ct ur e evi dence f r om Lae suggest s ott hat an ant enna m ount ed under neat h t hef usel age m have been t or n of f f r om t he ayf uel -heavy El ect r a dur i ng t axi or t akeof ff r om Laes t ur f r unw ay, t hough no ant enna wasr epor t ed f ound at Lae. D D i ggi ns, i n hi s on wbi ogr aphy of Paul M z (w assi st ed ant hoEar har t and N oonan i n t hei r f l i ghtpl anni ng), not ed t hat t he avi at or s had cutof f t hei r l ong-w r e ant enna, due t o t he iannoyance of havi ng t o cr ank i t back i nt ot he ai r cr af t af t er each use.
  • 15. Radio signals Earhart in the Electra cockpit, c. 1936 During Earhart and Noonans approach to Howland Island the Itasca received strong and clear voice transmissions from Earhart identifying as KHAQQ but she apparently was unable to hear voice transmissions from the ship. At 7:42 am on July 2, Earhart radioed "We must be on you, but cannot see you—but gas is running low. Have been unable to reach you by radio.
  • 16. ar e f l yi ng at 1,000 f eet ." H 7:58 am ert r ansm ssi on sai d she coul dnt hear t he iI t asca and asked t hem t o send voi ce si gnal sso she coul d t r y t o t ake a r adi o bear i ng(t hi s t r ansm ssi on w r epor t ed by t he i asI t asca as t he l oudest possi bl esi gnal , i ndi cat i ng Ear har t and Noonan w e eri n t he i m edi at e ar ea). They coul dnt send mvoi ce at t he f r equency she asked f or , soM se code si gnal s w e sent i nst ead. or erEar har t acknow edged r ecei vi ng t hese but lsai d she w unabl e t o det er m ne t hei r as i
  • 17. I n her l ast know t r ansm ssi on at n i8:43 am Ear har t br oadcast "W ar e eon t he l i ne 157 337. W w l l e ir epeat t hi s m essage. W w l l e ir epeat t hi s on 6210 ki l ocycl es.W t ." H ever , a f ew m ent s ai ow oml at er she w back on t he sam as ef r equency (3105 kH w t h a z) it r ansm ssi on w ch w l ogged as i hi asa "quest i onabl e": "W ar e r unni ng e [107]
  • 18. LegacyEar har t w a w del y know i nt er nat i onal as i ncel ebr i t y dur i ng her l i f et i m H shyl y e. erchar i sm i c appeal , i ndependence, per si st ence, atcool ness under pr essur e, cour age and goal -or i ent ed car eer al ong w t h t he ci r cum ances of i sther di sappear ance at a com at i vel y ear l y age parhave dr i ven her l ast i ng f am i n popul ar ecul t ur e. H undr eds of ar t i cl es and scor es ofbooks have been w i t t en about her l i f e w ch i s r hiof t en ci t ed as a m i vat i onal t al e, especi al l y otf or gi r l s. Ear har t i s gener al l y r egar ded as a [168]
  • 19. Ear har t s accom i shm s i n pl entavi at i on i nspi r ed a gener at i on off em e avi at or s, i ncl udi ng t he m e al ort han 1,000 w en pi l ot s of t he omW en Ai r f or ce Ser vi ce Pi l ot s om(W ASP) w f er r i ed m l i t ar y ho iai r cr af t , t ow gl i der s, f l ew t ar get edpr act i ce ai r cr af t , and ser ved ast r anspor t pi l ot s dur i ng W l d W or ar [169][170]
  • 20. Recor ds and achi evem s ent W ans w l d al t i t ude r ecor d: 14,000 f t om or (1922) Fi r st w an t o f l y t he At l ant i c (1928) om Speed r ecor ds f or 100 km (and w t h 500 l b i (230 kg) car go) (1931) Fi r st w an t o f l y an aut ogyr o (1931) om Al t i t ude r ecor d f or aut ogyr os: 15,000 f t (1931) .S. Fi r st per son t o cr oss t he U i n an aut ogyr o (1932)
  • 21. Fi r st per son t o f l y t he At l ant i c t w ce (1932) iFi r st w an t o r ecei ve t he D st i ngui shed Fl yi ng C oss om i r(1932)Fi r st w an t o f l y nonst op, coast -t o-coast acr oss t he U om .S.(1933)W ans speed t r anscont i nent al r ecor d (1933) omFi r st per son t o f l y sol o bet ween Honol ul u, H ai i and awO and, C i f or ni a (1935) akl alFi r st per son t o f l y sol o f r om Los Angel es, C i f or ni a t o alM co C t y, M co (1935) exi i exiFi r st per son t o f l y sol o nonst op f r om M co C t y, exi iM co t o N ar k, N Jer sey (1935) exi ew ewSpeed r ecor d f or east -t o-w est f l i ght f r om O and, aklC i f or ni a t o H al onol ul u, H ai i (1937)[173 aw
  • 22. Books by Earhart•20 Hrs., 40 Min. (1928) was a journal of herexperiences as the first woman passenger on atransatlantic flight.•The Fun of It (1932) was a memoir of her flyingexperiences and an essay on women in aviation.•Last Flight (1937) featured the periodic journalentries she sent back to the United States during herworld flight attempt, published in newspapers in theweeks prior to her final departure from New Guinea.Compiled by her husband GP Putnam after shedisappeared over the Pacific, many historiansconsider this book to be only partially Earhartsoriginal work.

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