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This value drawing lesson is inspired by Alexander Gardner's 1865 photo of Abraham Lincoln. Students will pose for their photo and use it as a reference for their value drawing. Then add black and …

This value drawing lesson is inspired by Alexander Gardner's 1865 photo of Abraham Lincoln. Students will pose for their photo and use it as a reference for their value drawing. Then add black and white text and articles into the negative space to reflect what they value.

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  • 1. Looking older than his 55 years, Lincoln seemed more like a regular person than a president in his dark suit, white shirt, and crooked bowtie. Alexander Gardner, known for his candid photographs, did nothing to flatter the president’s haggard features. Instead, he let Lincoln’s expression reveal his weary and worried countenance during the last long weeks of the Civil War. Abraham Lincoln, Pres., U.S., 1809-1865 Artist: Alexander Gardner Date: 1865 Alexander Gardner (1821–1882), Abraham Lincoln, Pres., U.S., 1809-1865. April 10, 1865. Photographic print. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
  • 2. Project: Combine your value drawing in the style of Abraham Lincoln’s Portrait with text about your values in the negative space.
  • 3. First step: pose for your portrait photo. You need to imitate Lincoln’s pose for the drawing lesson.
  • 4. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 5. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 6. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 7. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 8. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 9. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 10. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 11. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 12. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 13. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 14. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 15. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 16. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 17. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 18. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 19. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 20. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 21. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 22. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 23. Let’s begin our sketch based on Lincoln’s portrait. Your photo will be your guide for the details later.
  • 24. Use your photo to add the details.
  • 25. Look for the lights and darks in your photograph. Lightly shade your portrait to create value.
  • 26. Look for the lights and darks in your photograph. Lightly shade your portrait to create value.
  • 27. Look for the lights and darks in your photograph. Lightly shade your portrait to create value.
  • 28. Look for the lights and darks in your photograph. Lightly shade your portrait to create value.
  • 29. Now go back and add more contrast.
  • 30. Find newspaper articles and black and white text that describe you and what you value. Add this to the negative space.
  • 31. Find newspaper articles and black and white text that describe you and what you value. Add this to the negative space.
  • 32. Find newspaper articles and black and white text that describe you and what you value. Add this to the negative space.
  • 33. What do you value? Reflect on what your art work is saying about you?
  • 34. Resources: Gettysburg Address A House Divided Alexander Gardner American Civil War Alexander Gardner Library of Congress Images American, Maryland, October 2, 1862 Albumen print Abraham Lincoln Association