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How to Make Your University the Technology Source of Choice for Innovation -- Structuring Deals Creatively
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How to Make Your University the Technology Source of Choice for Innovation -- Structuring Deals Creatively

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These slides by John McEntire (formerly of the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) were part of a panel led by Fuentek, LLC on technology licensing at universities, presented at the Technology ...

These slides by John McEntire (formerly of the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) were part of a panel led by Fuentek, LLC on technology licensing at universities, presented at the Technology Transfer Society conference, October 2, 2009.

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How to Make Your University the Technology Source of Choice for Innovation -- Structuring Deals Creatively How to Make Your University the Technology Source of Choice for Innovation -- Structuring Deals Creatively Presentation Transcript

  • October 2, 2009 Laura Schoppe Fuentek, LLC Karen LeVert Southeast TechInventures Kathleen Needham NASA’s Glenn Research Center John McEntire Pacific Northwest National Laboratory How to Make Your University the Technology Source of Choice for Innovation
  • Structuring Deals Creatively John McEntire Manager, Information Technology Commercialization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy http://www.pnl.gov/business/tech_transfer.asp
  • A Versatile Technology
    • Method for microscale precision particle fabrication (PPF)
    • Many potential applications
      • Medical
        • A platform for drug delivery
      • Industrial
        • Photography
        • Photocopying and printing
        • High-precision optics
        • Much more
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Commercialization Options
    • Inventors interested in forming a start-up
      • Had looked into funding, but had not yet developed business plan
    • Commercial licensing interest
      • Several companies interested in drug-delivery applications
      • Commercial viability of industrial applications uncertain
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Solution: A Two-Path Strategy Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • The Outcomes: Drug-Delivery Path
    • Delays in pursuing licensing interest
    • Significant market shift
      • Pharma began focusing less on platforms and more on drugs
    • Interest dwindled among established companies
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • The Outcomes: PPF Technique Path
    • Some commercial interest, but level of development problematic
      • Current production: Grams/minute
      • Industry need: Pounds/minute
      • Low-margin industries not willing to take development risk
      • Inventors unable to devote lab resources to development
    • Lead inventors never formed start-up company, but…
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Success: License to a Start-Up
    • Orbis Biosciences (Kansas City, KS)
    • Founded by co-inventor
    • Offers development consulting services for PPF
    • Emphasizes technology’s applicability to various industries
      • Pharmaceuticals
      • Food and nutraceuticals
      • Agriculture
      • Personal care
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Lessons Learned
    • The slice-and-dice approach is feasible and has advantages
    • If the market is ready, jump!
      • Waiting risks losing window of opportunity
    • Be willing to change directions
      • Feedback from companies considering tech carefully revealed that some assumptions about tech’s value were mistaken
    Case Study 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign