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Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect
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Bilingualism vs. The Matthew Effect

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    • 1. Bilingualism vs.the Matthew Effect Fernando Trujillo Sáez Universidad de Granada TRICLIL 2012
    • 2. CLIL programmes run the risk of becoming a subtle way of classifying students, so that only the labelled as "more capable" are recommended to take the CLIL stream. This seems to be a perfect way of reproducing thehideous "Mathew Effect". On the other hand it is often the case that well-meaning (butprejudiced) schools assume that students comingfrom cultural minorities belong to the "less capable" group. Can you give us some hope and tell us about experiences and procedures to ensure truly democratic access to CLIL programmes in compulsory education?
    • 3. • The risk of classification • It’s not a risk: it’s a reality. • Student selection • Teaching strategy selection • Carreer selection
    • 4. • The problem: school is not compensating socio-economic background. School as a reproduction instrument. • Inter-generation mobility in Andalucia: • only 10,1% of parents with just Primary Studies have children with Higher Education (Oscar D. Marcenaro) • Secondary Education: • 14,0% de mothers & 16,1% of fathers have no degree at all; • job status: 33,0% of fathers, primary sector,37,4% of mothers work at home.
    • 5. • There is a slight decrease in the correlation between parents’ and children’s level of attainment.• However, academic success is still limited to economical situation of families.
    • 6. • The answer is not less school or less public school, but more.• We need micro-, qualitative, emic analysis (vs. macro-, quantitative, etic analysis).
    • 7. • Cases • CEIP Federico García Lorca, in Ceuta, bilingual (British Council) school. Producing students who are reaching Higher Education.
    • 8. • Cases • CEIP Federico García Lorca, in Ceuta, bilingual (British Council) school. Producing students who are reaching Higher Education thanks to CLIL and its impact on L1 and L2.
    • 9. • Cases • CEIP San José Obrero, in Seville, bilingual school (Plan de Fomento del Plurilingüismo & Programa de Interculturalidad). From the margins to the core of the system through leadership.
    • 10. • Cases • CPR El Chaparral, in Mijas (Málaga), bilingual school (Plan de Fomento del Plurilingüismo & Programa de Interculturalidad). Peer-teaching, families and intercultural competence.
    • 11. • Cases • IES Ítaca, in Tomares (Seville), bilingual high school (Plan de Fomento del Plurilingüismo). School organization focused on key skills.
    • 12. • Guidelines • Awareness of the problem • Clear and mid-term language & educational policies • Teacher training (teaching strategies & values) • Professional Development (idem) • Re-consideration of school project & structures • Family-concerned educational practices • Assessment & research: students, teacher practices, institutions and policies

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