UPCOMING EVENTS
Today, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.:
Women’s History Month Observance
- McGill Training Center
April 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.:
...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
Commander’s Column
Contents
	News.............................. 3	 Sp...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 
News
By Brandon Bieltz
Staff Writer
Just one year ago, Fort Meade’s
...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
News
Ordnance
Unearthed
A member of an Explosive
Ordnance Detachment ...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
News
Story and photo by Lisa R. Rhodes
Staff Writer
Odin Powell doesn...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 
News
The goal of Sexual Assault Aware-
ness Month is to raise awaren...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
News
By Jane M. Winand
Chief, Legal Assistance Division
The Internal ...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 
News
By Nicole M. Woods
Baltimore Recruiting Battalion APA
The Balti...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil10 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
News
Story and photo by Tina Miles
PAO, 780th MI Brigade
For the fi...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 11
Sports
By Brandon Bieltz
Staff Writer
The Fort Meade Patriots cont...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil12 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
Sports
It’s a week full of decisions for Mr. Jones.
It started Marc...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 13
Community News  Notes
The deadline for Soundoff! community
“News a...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil14 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014
Community News  Notes
Attention Control, Put It In Perspective,
Int...
http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 15
MoviesCommunity News  Notes
The movie schedule is subject to chang...
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Soundoff march 20, 2014

  1. 1. UPCOMING EVENTS Today, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.: Women’s History Month Observance - McGill Training Center April 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.: Child Abuse Prevention Month - Family Assistance Center April 4, 6:30 a.m.: Sexual Assault Awareness Run - McGlachlin Parade Field April 10, 11:30 a.m.: Holocaust Remembrance Observance - McGill Training Center April 12, 9-11 a.m.: Easter Bunny Breakfast - Conference Ctr. trusted care Certified child care providers give parents quality service, peace of mind page 6 better days Single service members program enhances quality of life, builds friendships page 3 Soundoff!´ vol. 66 no. 11 Published in the interest of the Fort Meade community March 20, 2014 photo by Stephen Ellmore Keiff Hash and Rod Belangue of the Army and Air Force Exchange Service maintenance crew install car stops in the new Express parking lot on Wednesday morning. The retail portion, including the gas pumps, of the $5.6 million facility is expected to open Friday, while the food services will open later this month. The Express is located on Mapes Road and 6th Armored Cavalry Road. finishing touches
  2. 2. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 Commander’s Column Contents News.............................. 3 Sports...................................11 Crime Watch.................. 4 Movies..................................15 Community..................13 Classified..............................16 Editorial Staff Garrison Commander Col. Brian P. Foley Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Latter Public Affairs Officer Chad T. Jones Chad.T.Jones.civ@mail.mil Chief, Command Information Philip H. Jones Philip.H.Jones.civ@mail.mil Assistant Editor Senior Writer Rona S. Hirsch Staff Writer Lisa R. Rhodes Staff Writer Brandon Bieltz Design Coordinator Timothy Davis Supple­mental photography provided by The Baltimore Sun Media Group Advertising General Inquiries 410-332-6300 or email advertise@baltsun.com If you would like information about receiving Soundoff! on Fort Meade or are experiencing distribution issues, call 877-886-1206 or e-mail TP@baltsun.com. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday through Sunday, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Printed by offset method of reproduction as a civilian enterprise in the interest of the personnel at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, by The Baltimore Sun Media Group, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, every Thursday except the last Thursday of the year in conjunction with the Fort Meade Public Affairs Office. Requests for publication must reach the Public Affairs Office no later than Friday before the desired publication date. Mailing address: Post Public Affairs Office, Soundoff! IMME-MEA-PA, Bldg. 4409, Fort Meade, MD 20755-5025. Telephone: 301-677-5602; DSN: 622-5602. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, creed, color, national origin, marital status, handicap or sex of purchaser, user or patron.A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by an advertiser will result in the refusal to print advertising from that source. Printed by The Baltimore Sun Co., LLC, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of the Army. Opinions expressed by the publisher and writers herein are their own and are not to be considered an official expression by the Department of the Army. The appearance of advertisers in the publication does not constitute an endorsement by the Department of the Army of the products or services advertised. www.ftmeade.army.mil You can also keep track of Fort Meade on Twitter at twitter.com/ftmeademd and view the Fort Meade Live Blog at ftmeade.armylive.dodlive.mil. Soundoff!´ Guaranteed circulation: 11,285 Hello again, Team Meade. March is already half over and, yes, it is still snow- ing! So as I wrote two weeks ago, hoping once again this week’s event was our last, and I’m still confident spring will be in full bloom by the end of the month. We’ll get to work patching the roads and parking lots soon, and repaving those that need it. We’re also working on a long-term effort to widen and modern- ize Mapes and Reece roads, our primary east/west arteries. This effort will be challenging in a time of con- strained resources. But our campaign to highlight growth on Fort Meade is making good progress, and I’m confident we’ll be able to make a strong case for our needs. Earlier this month we said goodbye to Chaplain (Col.) Carl R. Rau, who retired after 33 years of ser- vice to our nation. Thanking Chaplain Rau gave me cause to reflect on the importance of our Chaplain Corps and the Fort Meade Religious Support Office. No branch of our Army or military defines the term “selfless service”better than the Chaplain Corps. Chaplains minister in every possible form and fash- ion — from traditional pastoral counseling and life counseling to grief counseling and marital counseling — and sometimes, just providing a safe place and an ear for a frustrated service member to let off steam, or even just find a quiet place for a hot cup of coffee and some personal reflection. Chaplains do it all, and they do it wherever the Army goes, in the harshest of conditions — in the jungles, foxholes and firebases of places like Haiti, Iraq, Afghanistan, Korea, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and on and on. Chaplains remove feelings of grief, fear and confu- sion as they minister, and replace them with comfort and peace of mind. Because they are most often not allowed to share the information confided in them, I often think of chaplains as sponges or black holes. Taking grief and fear out of others, and hold- ingitwithinthem- selves, without the ability to let it out by sharing. The importance of having someone to care for chap- lains as they care for others cannot be overstated. So I encourage all to take a few moments this week to thank them. That is also where our chaplain assistants, employ- ees and volunteers that make up our wonderful Reli- gious Support Office come in. Our Army chaplain assistants are Soldiers assigned to protect and care for chaplains as they care for us. Chaplains are considered noncombatants by the Geneva Convention, and as such, do not carry weap- ons. Chaplain assistants bear arms, and are tasked to protect their chaplain when in combat. Many have sacrificed their lives doing just that, and to all we owe a debt of thanks for their selfless service. We are truly fortunate to have such a wonderful Religious Support Office on Fort Meade. From Rabbi Levi Finkelstein conducting a daily Jewish sunrise service (the only one on any DoD installation, I might add) to Diana L. Durner and the administration staff making sure the organization runs smoothly, to the volunteers who teach Sunday school and run many of our events, I extend my deepest thanks on behalf of our nine practicing faith groups, and each and every member of our Team Meade community. I hope everyone had a safe and fun St. Patrick’s Day. And if we all keep thinking warm, happy thoughts, the snow will melt faster. I hope! Thanks to our Chaplain Corps! COL. Brian P. Foley Garrison Commander Commander’s Open Door Garrison Commander Col. Brian P. Foley has an open door policy. All service members, retirees, government employees, family members and community members age 18 or older are invited to address issues or con- cerns to the commander directly by visiting Foley’s office on Mondays from 4 to 6 p.m. at garrison headquarters in Hodges Hall, Bldg. 4551, Llewellyn Avenue. Visitors are seen on a first-come, first-served basis. No appointment is necessary. For more information, call 301-677-4844.
  3. 3. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! News By Brandon Bieltz Staff Writer Just one year ago, Fort Meade’s Better Opportunity for Single Soldiers barely had 10 service members signing up for weekend trips and even fewer attending meetings. Since opening BOSS to all service branches, the program for the installa- tion’s single service members has more than doubled over the past several months with waiting lists for trips and up to 40 representatives at meetings. “We have increased in all areas,” said Sgt. Chatonna Powell, the garrison’s BOSS representative. “Our numbers for everything — trips, community service, attending meetings — everything has increased over the past year.” BOSS, which is open to all single enlisted service members, is designed to engage military members in the com- munity through volunteerism and recre- ational trips. The program also provides single service members with an avenue to improve quality of life on post. “It’s people getting engaged in where they live and trying to improve that,” said Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas J. Latter. “The volunteerism is getting out in the community, help- ing out at a local food bank, helping with Wreaths Across America — just being engaged and giving back to the community.” Powell calls BOSS “the voice” of the single service members as the program is focused on solving quality of life by addressing issues faced by members of the military. Unit representatives meet on the first and third Tuesday of every month to discuss issues effecting them. “We cover any quality-of-life issues,” Latter said. “I find out if there’s a problem in the barracks or a problem somewhere. So that skips all the chains [of command], comes right up to me so I can address those issues.” Volunteer work is a staple of the Fort Meade program. Members of BOSS have volunteered for various programs including post events, animal shelters, Honor Flights in Washington, D.C., and at MacArthur Middle School. “We’re here to help out our com- munity,” said Spc. David Jaiman, Fort Meade’s BOSS president. “That’s what the military is, helping out the commu- nity and doing things for other people BOSS program expands to include all branches photo by noah scialom Joe Basile (left) serves chili to Pfc. Antonio Lewis and Marine Pfc. Elisha Peake during the Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers’ chili cookoff on March 7. BOSS, which is open to all single enlisted service members, is designed to engage military members in the community through volunteerism and recreational trips. The program also provides single service members with an avenue to improve quality of life on post and make new friends. — not just for yourself.” The program, which is funded by the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, also provides a variety of social events such as ski trips, parasailing and zip lining. The trips help single service members make connections, Powell said. “It’s kind of a way for them to net- work and get to know other service members,” she said. “It’s a way for them to be able to get out and get involved and do things rather than just be stuck in their room after work.” Jaiman, who has been part BOSS for several years at various installations, described the program as a “good out- let to have fun and interact with other people.” The increased growth of Fort Meade’s BOSS, he said, has improved the program. “It just becomes a great program,” he said “More interaction, more person-to- person contact and it becomes fun. You get to know people a lot better. Friend- ships develop as well. I’ve met a lot of great people through this program.” Latter said he is happy with its direc- tion and has high standards for its future. The goal, he said, is to develop BOSS slowly to establish a strong foun- dation. “Building the support, slowly but steadily I think, is going to have a last- ing impression on all of the incoming service members here on Fort Meade,” Latter said, “so that they know there’s a way for them to quickly integrate into the community and find friends to do things with.” Editor’s note: Philip H. Jones, chief of command information, contributed to this story. For more information about the BOSS program, contact Sgt. Powell at 301-677-6868. Connect with Fort Meade at Facebook.com /ftmeade
  4. 4. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 News Ordnance Unearthed A member of an Explosive Ordnance Detachment from Fort Belvoir, Va., holds an inert, training mortar round that a utility crew unearthed while working in Potomac Place on March 11. The mortar was found about a foot underground near houses. The Directorate of Emer- gency Services evacu- ated residences in the area and blocked off a 300-meter section as the EOD removed the mortar. A similar mortar was located in the same area several months ago. Unexploded ordnances are not always harmless and should not be touched or handled by an unqualified person. Always report the discovery of an UXO to emergency personnel. Photo by Brandon Bieltz March 15, Driving while under the influence of alcohol, driving while impaired by alcohol: The Directorate of Emergency Ser- vices was notified of a possible intoxicated driver at the Reece Road gate. Police made contact withthedriver,whohadastrong odor of an alcoholic beverage emitting from her. She agreed to perform a couple of tests to determine her ability to drive, which she performed poorly. The driver rendered an insufficient breath sample. March 11, Larceny of private property: The victim stated she discovered that a Ziploc bag containing a number of jewelry items was missing from her residence. CommunityCommunity Crime Watch Compiled by the Fort Meade Directorate of Emergency Services For week of March 10-16: • Moving violations: 21 • Nonmoving violations: 5 • Verbal warnings for traffic stops: 29 • Traffic accidents: 8 • Driving on suspended license: 2 • Driving on suspended registration: 0 • Driving without a license: 3 By Ryan D. Yarnell Personal Financial Readiness Specialist Army Community Service It’s tax time, and if you’re like mil- lions of Americans, you’re expecting a refund. This is a perfect time to evalu- ate why you’re getting this refund. For most Americans, at least some of their federal income tax refund comes from over-withholding from their pay- checks throughout the year. When we over-withhold, all we are doing is providing an interest-free loan to the federal government. We send them money to hold onto throughout the year, and they send it back to us a few weeks after we file our return. No interest is paid, we lose access to this money until we file and receive the refund, and actually lose purchas- ing power due to inflation. It’s not free money, as some believe. It’s just getting our own money back. Additionally, many service members with families actually owe no federal taxes, especially if the military paycheck is the only one in the household. With deductions, exemptions and tax credits such as the Child Tax Credit, often their tax liability ends up being $0. With refundable tax credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, they will receive money back they didn’t pay in. This means that every penny withheld from their paycheck will be returned when they file. Instead of over-withholding, I rec- ommend the Goldilocks approach: Don’t withhold too little, don’t with- hold too much. Instead, withhold just right. This way, your withholding through- out the year will match your tax liabili- ty. You won’t get a tax refund, but your paycheck will be larger each payday. Also, you’ll still receive any refundable tax credits, if eligible. What many don’t realize is that the amount withheld each paycheck is determined by the information col- lected on their Form W-4 they file with their employers. This form identifies whether they are married or single and how many allowances they would like to claim. The more allowances, the less the employer will withhold for federal taxes. A common misconception is that the allowances should match the number of people in the household. But this is not accurate. The number of allow- ances should be determined by the expected tax liability for the year. “But I like my refund; it forces me to save.” I hear this often. Does it really force you to save? What are you doing with your refund? For some, the refund is truly forced savings, and they use the money on things like big-ticket purchases and vacations. For others, the refund allows them to catch up from the previous year by paying bills that are overdue or for debt they incurred, which is accruing interest. (The average credit card APR is 15.38 percent.) In either case, there are better ways. Instead of forced savings with the fed- eral government, use a savings account. It might actually earn some interest, and you also will have access during the year if you need the money. Instead of using a refund to catch up, adjust your withholding so your paycheck is larger. Hopefully, this will keep you from getting behind or adding to your debt in the first place. Use the IRS Tax Withholding Calcu- lator at apps.irs.gov/app/withholding- calculator/ to determine the appropri- ate amount of withholding and file a revised Form W-4 with your employer. For service members, this can be done on MyPay within seconds. For more information, call the Joint Installation Tax Center at 301-677- 9366. To schedule an appointment with an Army Community Service financial counselor, go to fortmeadeacs.checkap- pointments.com. Tax refunds: Should you adjust your federal withholding?
  5. 5. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 News Story and photo by Lisa R. Rhodes Staff Writer Odin Powell doesn’t mind being dropped off in the morning at the home of his Fort Meade Family Child Care provider in Heritage Park. “I know he’s in a good spot,” said Tech Sgt. Jamie Powell, mother of 21-month- old Odin. “He likes to be dropped off and he doesn’t like to be picked up.” Powell and her husband, Tech Sgt. Christopher Powell, both employed at the Defense Media Activity, have worked with Chandra Wolfe, the family’s FCC provider, for nearly three years. “I say it’s more personal. She’s like his second mom,” Jamie Powell said of the toddler’s relationship with Wolfe. “She’s very flexible and understanding of our work schedules.” Post Family Child Care providers undergo rigorous certification training age 2. If the provider’s children are under age 8, they are included in the total. The FCC program is part of Child, Youth and School Services. FCC provid- ers are required to adhere to the same Army regulations as staff who work at the CDCs. Prior to becoming an FCC provider, Wolfe worked for 14 years as a fine jew- elry manager for a major retailer. She said she often worked nights and week- ends, and traveled a great deal. During that time, Wolfe said, her husband cared for their two sons, Kadin, now 14, and Tristin, now 11. But when Rylan was born three years ago, Wolfe’s husband suggested that she become an FCC provider. Wolfe said that in addition to being home with her son and helping to pro- vide for her family, being an FCC pro- vider is an important responsibility. “You have to be on your toes,” she said. “You must follow all the rules and regulations to protect the children.” Matthews said a benefit of FCC cer- tification is that it can be applied to working at other Army and military installations. Hardy said that it is a violation of Army regulations for anyone to provide home child care on the installation for more than 10 hours a week on a regular basis without FCC certification. Those on Fort Meade who provide unauthorized day care may lose their housing privileges and jeopardize the career of their military family member. To become a certified FCC provider, call Hardy or Matthews at 301-677- 1160. The next FCC pre-orientation brief- ing is April 2 from 9 to 11 a.m. at the School Age Services at 1900 Reece Road. Matthews and Hardy will explain the program and the application process for prospective providers. Parents interested in enrolling in an FCC home must register with Parent Central Services. The same waiting list policy applies to FCC as it does for the CDCs’ child care service. For more information, call Parent Cen- tral Services at 301-677-1149 or 301-677- 1156. Chandra Wolfe, a Fort Meade Family Child Care provider, helps Odin Powell, 21 months; Wolfe’s son Rylan, 3; and Elizabeth Lesche, 2 1/2, with an arts and crafts project in her Heritage Park home. Prospective providers undergo a rigorous certification process that includes annual background checks and six days of training. Wolfe is one of more than 20 child care providers on post who are certified by the installation to provide day care for military personnel and DoD civilians. “I always thought I would open my own day care center one day,” said Wolfe, wife of Tech Sgt. Matthew Wolfe who works at the National Security Agency. “I get to stay home with [my son] Rylan and make a decent income. I love chil- dren.” More than 100 children are enrolled in the program. They are registered to par- ticipate through Parent Central Services on Reece Road. Currently, the program is recruiting providers, particularly candidates inter- ested in caring for infants. The FCC certification process is rig- orous. Prospective child care providers must be at least 18 years old and high school graduates. They are required to attend an orientation session as well as six days of training in child development, health, nutrition, communicable diseases, special needs, fire and safety standards, child abuse identification and preven- tion, and administrative paperwork. Providers also receive training in CPR once a year and in first aid every three years. Background checks are conducted every year on providers and their family members ages 12 and older who live in the home. Once the initial background check is cleared, Patricia Hardy and Christine Matthews, the program’s co-directors, inspect the provider’s home. The home also is inspected by the Fort Meade Fire Department, the Installation Safety Office and a public health nurse from Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Cen- ter. Once providers pass these inspections, they are certified. The Army now provides a subsidy for parents who select an FCC provider for child care. The FCC provider’s fee is the same fee required if the child is enrolled at a Child Development Center, plus a 10 percent discount. The fee is established by Parent Central Services. FCC providers may care for a total of six children, two of whom can be under Relax, Refresh Revitalize For Free! The Yoga Center Of Columbia 8950 State Route 108, Suite 109, Columbia, MD 21045 410.720.4340 www.columbiayoga.com FREE YOGA, PILATES, QIGONG MEDITATION CLASSES AT HOWARD COUNTY’S BEST YOGA STUDIO April 7 - 13, 2014 No Prior Yoga or Fitness Experience Necessary. No Obligation. Call 410-720-4340 Or Email Us at info@columbiayoga.com To Reserve Your Spot. Visit www.columbiayoga.com For The Full Schedule. Discounted Classes For Seniors, Teens Active Military Personnel Their Spouses. @YogaCtrColumbia
  6. 6. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! News The goal of Sexual Assault Aware- ness Month is to raise awareness of sexual assault and spotlight the need for prevention and intervention as well as the availability of services for victims of sexual assault. The national 2014 SAAM theme is: “It’s time ... to talk about it! Your voice. Our future. Prevent sexual violence.” Each April, the DoD and other orga- nizations across the country commemo- rate Sexual Assault Awareness Month. This annual observance provides the opportunity to highlight the efforts that DoD and the respective military services are taking to combat sexual crimes and promote prevention. The Army, Navy and Air Force sex- ual assault response coordinators, or SARCs, and Army partner command Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) personnel at Fort Meade have joined together to plan various events. The hope is that all members of the community will “join the conversation and use their voice to shape our future and prevent sexual assault.” Events on Fort Meade include: • Changemaker’s Breakfast/Victim Advocate Recognition: March 31, 9- 10:30 a.m. at Potomac Place Neighbor- hood Center Victim advocates, representing all branches of military service, and com- munity leaders are invited for breakfast. • “Got Your Back”: April 1-17 Myths about sex are being used to blame victims, protect perpetrators and confuse potential bystanders into inac- tion. This program applies information learned about perpetrators’ motives and behaviors in order to devise successful bystander-intervention strategies, and decrease community tolerance for sexual violence. This event, sponsored by the Depart- ment of the Army, is open to all service branches. The workshop will: - Make connections between sexist language, stereotypes about “hooking up,” and the perpetuation of a culture that supports rapists. - Discuss the difference between a healthy sexual encounter, a regretted sexual encounter and rape. - Encourage individuals to act as change agents within military culture to ensure it does not perpetuate a climate that enables sex offenders to operate. - Incorporate DoD/military core values and utilize these principles to empower personnel to be allies in sexual assault prevention. • April 1-3: 9 and 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. at McGill Training Center • April 9-10: 9 and 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. at National Security Agency, Friedman Auditorium • April 14-15: 9 and 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. at McGill Training Center • April 16: 9 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at NSA, Friedman Auditorium • April 17: 9 and 11 a.m. at NSA, HQ9A135 conference room • April 17: 1 p.m. at NSA, Friedman Auditorium, Other events • Joint Service Sexual Assault Aware- ness Day of Action Community Run: April 4 from 6:30-8 a.m. at McGlachlin Parade Field. Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Thom- as J. Latter will meet with all senior enlisted advisors before 6:20 a.m. at the gazebo area. After Reveille, Latter will give remarks and the run will immediately follow. The formation will run the designated route as one group. At the end of the run, Garrison Com- mander Col. Brian P. Foley and other leaders will gather at the Constitution Park archway as the units run past and back to the starting position. Once all units return to their original areas, remarks will be presented. For more information, call Linda Winkels at 301-677-4719 or email linda. m.winkels.civ@mail.mil ,or call Carol DeBarto at 301-677-5229 or email carol. r.debarto.civ@mail.mil. • April 11: “Breaking the Silence” at 1:30 p.m. at McGill Training Center Guest speaker is Monika Korra of the Monika Korra Foundation. After she was kidnapped and raped in 2009, Korra decided she would not be defined as a victim and began speaking up about the rape. Korra found that her voice gave other survivors their voice back. The event, sponsored by the Military District of Washington, is open all ser- vice branches. • April 23: Denim Day This is an international protest responding to the Italian Supreme Court’s overruling of a rape conviction in 1999. Although the assailant had been found guilty at trial, the Supreme Court argued that because jeans are difficult to remove, the assailant couldn’t have done so without the victim’s help. Thus, the victim gave consent. To honor Denim Day, USAG civilian personnel are authorized to wear appro- priate jeans to work to promote discus- sion of the misconceptions that surround sexual violence. • April 24: Mock Trial: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort Meade courthouse In an effort to enhance mutual under- standing of the relationship between the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate and SHARP/SAPR personnel and to further educate advocates regarding the adjudi- cation process (and recent changes to the process), the Fort Meade SJA will host a mock Article 32 and court-martial. Air Force and Navy JAG personnel will be available to facilitate discussion among SAPR staff. • SAAM information tables/”Sole Sur- vivor” display at Fort Meade locations: Outreach tables with information about sexual harassment and sexual assault prevention and response, includ- ing information regarding local installa- tion and community resources, will be on display. The display includes a joint-service “Sole Survivor” display representing reports received at Fort Meade during the previous fiscal year. For more information, call Stacey Hale, installation sexual assault response coor- dinator, at 443-845-0876 or email stacey. t.hale.civ@mail.mil. Sexual Assault Awareness Month events observed throughout April Sexual Assault Awareness Month Navy events The Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Team is offering the following events for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. • March 31: Victim Advocate Recognition Breakfast: 9 a.m. at Argonne Hills Chapel Center Guest speaker is Miss York County, Pennsylvania: Trista Bixler- Kint. • April 4, 11, 18, 25: Teal Fridays: All government and civilian employees are encouraged to show their stand against sexual assault by wearing teal each Friday of the month of April. • April 4: Community Run and Proclamation Signing: 6:30 a.m. McGlachlin Parade Field • April 9: Internet Safety: 3:30 p.m., Teen Center Open discussion with teens on usage and safety while using Internet and mobile applications. • April 10: Lunch and Learn: “My kid said what?” NSA OPS 1-2W037-1 at 11:30 a.m. Bring your lunch and learn more about Internet safety and what you can do to reduce your teen’s risk of sexual assault. • April 11: “Breaking the Silence” 1:30 p.m., McGill Training Center Guest speaker is Monika Korra, who was raped in 2009. • April 15: Open Mic Night: 6-8 p.m., McGill Training Center ballroom Share your poetry, music, freestyle (rhyme and dance), or read from your favorite book. • April 28: NIOC dinner, dessert and discussion: Building 9803 day room - “Getting To Know Your SAPR Team” For more information, email Kimberly B. Garrett, sexual assault response coordinator, NIOC Maryland, at kimberly.garrett@navy. mil or call 301-677-9038 or 410-227- 6235. Resources: • 24/7 Victim Advocate Duty Phone: 301-602-1613. • DoD Safe Helpline: 1-877-995- 5247 Follow Fort Meade on Twitter.com /ftmeademd
  7. 7. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 News By Jane M. Winand Chief, Legal Assistance Division The Internal Revenue Service recently issued its annual “Dirty Dozen” listing of tax scams for consumers to avoid. Taxpayers may encounter these scams throughout the year, but these schemes seem to peak during tax filing season. Many scams use the IRS name to try to convince taxpayers that the scheme is legitimate. The IRS Criminal Investigation Division works closely with the Department of Justice to stop scams and prosecute the scammers. Here are this year’s “Dirty Dozen”: 1. Identity theft: The thief uses personal information such as your name and Social Security number to fraudulently file an income tax return and commit other crimes. 2. Phone scams: The scammer calls and pretends to be from the IRS to either steal your identity or threaten you with a false tax debt to extort payment. 3. Phishing: The scammer will send out unsolicited email, purporting to be a representative of the IRS, and will seek valuable personal and financial information. 4. False promises of large refunds from inflated tax returns Thieves may pose as tax preparers and convince the taxpayer to file a return using benefits and tax credits to which the taxpayer is not eligible. Since the taxpayer is responsible for the tax form, even if a scammer prepared it incorrect- ly, the taxpayer may be penalized for filing a false return or receiving a fraudulent refund. 5. Return preparer fraud: Some tax preparers unscrupulously prey on their customers and use data obtained from tax return preparation to commit identity theft. 6. Hiding income offshore: Some taxpayers avoid paying U.S. taxes by hiding income in offshore accounts, annui- ties and trusts. Even if you keep money in offshore accounts, you still must report these sums and will face stiff fines and penalties if you do not. 7. Impersonation of charitable organiza- tions: In the wake of a natural disaster, scammers often pop up with bogus charities to solicit contributions. These thieves also may attempt to get personal financial information to com- mit identity theft. Scammers also may contact disaster victims purporting to be IRS representatives and assist in the filing of fraudulent claims. 8. False income, expenses or exemptions: Taxpayers may claim expenses they did not pay or include income they never earned to maximize tax credits on their returns. These false claims may result in fines, pen- alties and even prosecution. Filing excessive claims for the fuel tax credit is an example of this scam. 9. Frivolous and outlandish arguments to avoid tax liability: Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage taxpayers to make ridiculous claims to avoid paying income taxes. Taxpayers have the right to contest their tax liability in court, but some frivolous claims have already been determined by the Tax Court to be invalid. Taxpayers who rely on frivolous claims may face fines, penalties and prosecution. 10. Falsely claiming zero wages or using a false Form 1099: Filing a phony tax return in an attempt to lower the amount of tax you owe is illegal. Also, don’t willingly allow a scammer to use your information to file a false return. 11. Abusive tax structures: Using Limited Liability Companies, Lim- ited Liability Partnerships, International Busi- ness Company and foreign financial accounts, some taxpayers scheme to evade income taxes. These multilayer transactions seek to con- ceal the true nature and ownership of taxable income and assets. 12. Misuse of trusts: Scammers will encourage consumers to transfer large amounts of assets into private annuity trusts and foreign trusts to shift income and maximize the deduction of per- sonal expenses. While some trusts may legitimately mini- mize tax liability, taxpayers should seek the advice of a trusted professional before enter- ing into what could be a questionable trust arrangement. There are many other scams that will seek to part you from your money. For more infor- mation on potential tax scams, check the link at www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Fraud-Alerts. If you think that you have been the victim of a scam, schedule an appointment to speak with an attorney at the Fort Meade Legal Assistance Office at 301-677-9504 or 301-677-9536. Be wary of “Dirty Dozen” tax scams YAMAHA POWERHOUSE DEALER WHILE-YOU-WAIT OIL CHANGES HOURS: M-F 10am-7pm • Sat 10am-5pm • Sun - Closed
  8. 8. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! News By Nicole M. Woods Baltimore Recruiting Battalion APA The Baltimore Recruiting Battalion hosted its semiannual Recruiting Partner- ship Council for all local support units on Feb. 22 at McGill Training Center. The RPC is as an open forum designed to strengthen synchronicity between vari- ous Army components including local recruiters, Reserve units, Reserve Officers’ Training Corps representatives, civilian aids to the Office of the Secretary of the Army, and local Army Reserve ambas- sadors. All units were given the opportunity to share specific needs and military occu- pational specialty shortages in their areas of operation. This was in addition to several presen- tations given by Command Sgt. Maj. of the U.S. Army Reserve Luther Thomas and Baltimore Battalion Commander Lt. Col. David S. Dinkelman, who spoke about current recruiting programs and incentives, along with the current themes and benefits of the ROTC program. In an effort to strengthen the working relationship between local Reserve units and the Baltimore Recruiting Battalion, local recruiting company commanders and their designated Reserve recruiters also were in attendance. Topics of discussions ranged from mission shortages to better community involvement, and synergy among com- mands that could offer bilateral support in the recruiting mission. With the Army Recruiting Command barely making mission in fiscal year 2012, it is already forecasted that a 2-3K mis- sion shortfall is expected in FY14. “The Army Reserves need to seek out guidance counselors, get them to help us isolate college bound students,” Din- kelman said. “We need to show those students the opportunities the Army can offer them. But it’s how we engage the student. This is how we close in on our mission. I’ve seen how you guys engage — it’s a beautiful thing — but we can always tweak.” Dinkelman provided an overview on the importance of having individual goals as well as organizational goals. “It is important to develop a goal and a message that can effectively engage college-bound seniors and even prior ser- vice,” Dinkelman said. “We need to con- vey that all we have is their best interest at heart. If they feel that, then they will let their guard down, just for a moment, Recruiting Partnership Council strengthens synchronicity and listen to us.” Thomas began his presentation with referring to Reserve units as being a cus- tomer — a customer that has a respon- sibility to help recruiters and to use all resources available. According to Thomas, Reserve units can help solidify a recruiter’s efforts by leveraging young Soldiers in those units who are within the 18-24 age range, in col- lege, have deployed, and can easily talk to civilians, letting them know that being in the Army is not as bad as they’ve heard. This also can provide opportunities to point out the many benefits of being in the Army as a young Soldier. “That’s a whole lot better than the 38-year-old who doesn’t have much in common with the 18 year old,” Thomas said. Thomas instructed all command ser- geants major to go into their recruiting stations and talk to the station command- ers about what they need help with. “Networking and building relation- ships is vital,” he said. “You need to dig the well before you’re thirsty. Build that well now and it will pay dividends later.” He also asked all Reserve units to look at conducting open houses that involve the local community, centers of influence, veterans and military service organiza- tions, schools, local officials — creating a platform that allows the community to share and also allows the Soldiers to fur- ther communicate the Army’s story. “Although we are in the community, we’re not always a part of the community and that is what we need to get better at,” Thomas said. “We need to be involved in everything from county fairs to local high school graduations and football games.” Sherwood “Woody” Goldberg, senior CASA for Washington, D.C., emphasized the importance of leveraging organiza- tions like the American Legion, while also considering the importance of relation- ship building. “The American Legion is there to bond with Soldiers,” he said. “They want to be needed. Engage with them and their inter- ests. Let them know they are important. That’s how they can help.” Goldberg explained that building rela- tionships is more than shaking hands and passing out business cards. “You can enhance trust in the com- munity when you seek out other people’s best interest,” he said. Programs like Referral and Recruiting Assistance (SMART, AR-RAP, A-RAP), in addition to new AR enlistment options and local advertising support, all dem- onstrate the balance between recruiters, Reserve units, and ROTC for an effective recruiting mission. “Department of the Army has the CASA, and the Army Reserve has AR ambassadors,” Thomas said. “Those are retired general officers, and a lot of them are members of substantial organizations in the community. They can come out to link you up with centers of influence in the community. “Go back and find out that the AR ambassadors are in your area — there are usually two in each state. They can help you a lot and open some doors.” PHOTO COURTESY OF Baltimore Recruiting Battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Luther Thomas, command sergeant major of the U.S. Army Reserve, speaks with Reserve units over lunch about any concerns in their areas of operations. Luther spoke during the Baltimore Recruiting Battalion’s semiannual Recruiting Partnership Council for all local support units on Feb. 22 at McGill Training Center.
  9. 9. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil10 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 News Story and photo by Tina Miles PAO, 780th MI Brigade For the first time in 18 years, the single largest event dedicated to raise funds and awareness for the Special Olympics Mary- land was canceled due to high wind gusts and hazardous waves. But that wasn’t about to deter the dedi- cated Maryland “plungers,” which included personnel from the 780th Military Intel- ligence Brigade. The annual Maryland State Police Polar Bear Plunge was originally scheduled to be held Jan. 25 at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis. However, high winds gusting up to 25 mph created 3-foot waves. That, combined with freezing temperatures, created a large buildup of snow and ice on the shore, result- ing in unsafe conditions. After careful assessment of all contribut- ing factors related to conducting the event, the Special Olympics Maryland — in con- sultation with the Maryland State Police and Maryland Park Service — made the decision to initially cancel this year’s event. Butinresponsetooverwhelmingrequests, the Special Olympics Maryland decided to reschedule the event for March 8 at Sandy Point State Park. Participating from the 780th MI Brigade was Staff Sgt. Kirston Smith, informa- tion management noncommissioned officer; Tania Robertson, civilian personnel special- ist; and Mike Lee, information management contractor. Smith’s faithful participation is person- al. “The Special Olympics hold a special place in my heart because my brother has cerebral palsy,” she said. This was Smith’s third year of plung- ing and she vowed to return again, as she loves supporting any organization that helps children. “I love doing things to support children, and I will be there again next year plunging for the kids,” Smith said. “I love volunteer- ing and supporting anything that gives back to the community.” Smith is a regular volunteer with the Fort Meade Partners in Education program within the 780th MI, and she donates to several local food banks, shelters and other charitable organizations as a result of her extreme couponing experience. The annual MSP Polar Bear Plunge was established in 1997, when approximately 350 participants first plunged into the icy waters of the Chesapeake Bay and raised $75,000. This year, thousands participated. Dona- tions for 2014 amounted to $1,745,162 raised for the athletes of Special Olympics Maryland. 780th Military Intelligence takes the plunge Staff Sgt. Kirston Smith (center left), information management noncommissioned officer, and Tania Robertson (center right), civilian personnel specialist, — both from the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade — brave the frigid waters of the Chesapeake Bay as they participate in the 18th annual Maryland State Police Polar Bear Plunge held March 8 at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis. The Polar Plunge is the single largest event dedicated to raise funds and awareness for the Special Olympics Maryland. Plungers were given souvenir T-shirts for their brave participation in the popular fundraiser.
  10. 10. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 11 Sports By Brandon Bieltz Staff Writer The Fort Meade Patriots continued its up-and-down season this weekend as the team split its two home games at Murphy Field House. With an 80-75 overtime loss to the National Capital Region Marines (7-4) on Saturday and an 80-73 win over the National Security Agency-Bethesda (2-11), the Patriots fell to fourth place in the Washington Area Military Athletic Conference with a 7-5 record. In both games the Patriots struggled with turnovers and scoreless droughts, but were able to put together needed runs to remain in the games. “You’re not going to win being inconsistent,” said head coach Ronny Cunningham. The Patriots started Saturday’s game slow as the Marines jumped out an 18-6 lead in the opening min- utes. A 13-2 run midway through the half pulled the Patri- ots back into the game, while a Larry Bailey layup gave Fort Meade its first lead of the game with two minutes left in the half. The Patriots and Marines went into halftime tied at 34. Dieon McClenton, who led Fort Meade with 12 points in the first half, continued to find success in the paint to keep the Patriots in the game at the start of the second half. Fort Meade held an 8-point lead six minutes into the half. The Patriots controlled the lead until less than two minutes left in the game. The Marines tied the game at 67 with 35 seconds left on the clock to force overtime. The teams were neck-and-neck through a majority of overtime, but the Marines closed the five-minute period with a 7-0 run to win 80-75. McClenton led the Patriots with 29 points, and Darion Bethea scored 18 as the Marines handed Fort Meade its fifth loss of the season. “When you’re in overtime or you have four or five minutes left in a tight game, heart and being mentally tough is what will win the game,” Cunningham said. The start of Sunday’s game against NSA-Bethesda didn’t appear any more promising as NSA took a 14-6 lead early on. Fort Meade again battled back to take an 8-point lead with a 17-1 run. NSA cut into the lead near the end of the half, but the Patriots held a 40-37 lead at halftime. NSA quickly regained the lead in the second half with a 24-9 run to hold a 13-point advantage with eight minutes left. Once again, the Patriots put together a 17-0 run to take a 4-point lead with two minutes remaining. Fort Meade held onto the lead to win 80-73 for the team’s seventh win. Daraius Evans had 23 points, while McClenton added 21. Cunningham said McClenton stepped up to fill the void left by the absence of Mike McKenzie. “I think Dieon is starting to understand how to make himself available in the paint,”Cunningham said. “I trust him any day.” The Patriots will close out the regular season at home this weekend with Fort Lee (6-6) on Saturday and the Marines on Sunday. If Fort Meade can win both games and has the point differential, they can still grab the No. 2 seed. “I think we can do good things come tournament time in two weeks,” Cunningham said. Patriots fall to Marines, defeat NSA-Bethesda The big second half sealed the 48-26 victory for NIOC. Timothy Taylor scored a game-high 16 points for NIOC, while Kendric Belfield led DMA with 10. After the game, Smart said he is confident in his team’s ability to bring home another championship for NIOC, but the team can’t afford another slow start. “We have to come out with more intensity and just run it all the way through,” he said. Story and photo by Brandon Bieltz Staff Writer For the third time in four years, the Navy Information Operations Command Maryland basketball team will be com- peting for an intramural championship. The Sailors won a title in 2011, then lost in 2012 and missed the champion- ship completely last year. But with a 48- 26 win on Tuesday night, NIOC is back in the finals. “Hopefully we’ll be 3-for-2,” said Eric Smart, the team’s coach. NIOC earned the title shot by defeat- ing the Defense Media Activity in the semifinals of the Division II intramural playoffs. The win also extended NIOC’s 10-game win streak that began in Janu- ary. After finishing the season with a divi- sion-best 11-1, NIOC only needed to take down the 741st Military Intelligence Battalion and DMA to earn the title slot. DMA, on the other hand, was fighting a more uphill battle at the No. 3 seed. On March 11, DMA narrowly defeat- ed the No. 2-seeded 94th Intelligence Squadron with a buzzer-beating 3-point- er. The win gave the team an extra boost in confidence that it could reach the championship after a 6-6 season record. “This is anybody’s game, it’s a tour- nament,” said James Walton, coach of DMA. “If we play hard like we did last game, then it shouldn’t be a problem here.” Despite a roster of inexperienced play- ers, the coaching staff knew a champion- ship was in the team’s reach. “From Day 1, even though we had an inexperienced team, we talked about the championship,” Walton said. “When it’s a tournament like this, anybody can win. We preached the championship from Day 1 and now we’re one game away.” DMA’s inexperience wasn’t evident early on in Tuesday game as the team jumped out to an early lead. A slow, deliberate attack appeared to get the best of NIOC, with DMA holding a 23-19 halftime lead. “We can’t go out and run with these guys,” Walton said. ”What we have to do is slow the game down.” The NIOC offense woke up at the start of the second half as the Sailors outscored DMA 29-3. A stronger defen- sive approach by NIOC forced a handful of turnovers. “We played pressure on our man,” Smart said. “We were very lackadaisical in the first half.” NIOC defeats DMA, earns title shot Ricky Thompson, of the Navy Information Operations Command Maryland intramural basketball team, signals his teammate during Tuesday’s Division II semifinal game against the Defense Media Activity. NIOC earned a spot in the championship game with the 48-26 win.
  11. 11. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil12 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 Sports It’s a week full of decisions for Mr. Jones. It started March 13 when I had the 11th pick in a 12-team fantasy baseball league. FYI, if you are in a league full of Orioles fans, do not have a team name that insults Saint Cal unless you want to draft late. But you know what? If folks had an ounce of objectivity, they’d see that former Detroit Tigers shortstop Alan Trammell was Cal Rip- ken Jr.’s daddy. bit.ly/1dlQxYi The good news regarding O’s fans’ lack of objectivity is that Chris Davis and Adam Jones were grabbed in the first round, so I was able to fill my middle infield with the best second baseman, Robinson Cano bit.ly/1izPEAm, and shortstop, Troy Tulowitzki bit.ly/1ifppyw, with my first two picks. This weekend, I am making my annual March pilgrimage to Michigan so I can pick fourth in “The League” with Cousin Claw at Slows Bar B-Q in Detroit. I should be able to grab Pirates outfielder Andrew McCutchen or Diamondbacks first baseman Paul Gold- schmidt. The real decisions will come later in the draft when I have nine picks in Rounds 5-10. So if I play my picks right, I should be able to control the middle part of the draft and start a premature run on closers or catchers so that more talented players fall to me. Currently, the most important decisions I am making involve my bracket. on.fb. me/1dm2zRk For those of you reading Jibber this morn- ing, you still have a few hours to register for a chance to win a $100 gift card in the Meade TV and Corvias Military Living Tournament Challenge. But since I am such a magnanimous Prince of Prognostication, I made Phil, Rona and the gang get you this week’s dose of Jibber a little early on the Fort Meade Facebook page. That way, you could take advantage of my knowl- edge and hopefully bring home the cash — or card, if you want to be all literal. South Region: • Cinderella: Stephen F. Austin The Lumberjacks are small, but they have four players who average double-digits in scor- ing and have won 28 straight. They should be able to handle VCU’s pres- sure and take advantage of UCLA’s lack of defense on its way to the Sweet 16. Western Michigan will beat Syracuse in the first round and Phil’s Ohio State Buckeyes to advance to the Sweet 16. • Sweet 16: Florida, SFA, Western Michigan and Kansas • Elite 8: Florida will defeat Kansas East Region: • Cinderella: St. Joseph’s Seniors Halil Kanacevicis and Langston Galloway lead a tough team, and head coach Phil Martelli knows how to coach in the tournament. The Hawks will run past their Big-5 rival, Villanova, and make their way to the Elite 8. • Sweet 16: Virginia, Michigan State, North Carolina, St. Joe’s • Elite 8: Michigan State will defeat St. Joe’s West Region: • Cinderella: I’m going chalk in the West, but Nebraska could beat Creighton and get to the Sweet 16. Also, if Oklahoma State gets by top-seed Arizona in the Round of 32, they could easily shake off their mid-season slump and dance all the way to the Final Four. • Sweet 16: Arizona, San Diego State, Creighton, Wisconsin • Elite 8: Arizona defeats Wisconsin Midwest Region: • Cinderella: Kentucky I know it is hard to consider the preseason No. 1 as a Cinderella, but the Wildcats have more than enough talent to make up for a poor regular season, and as much as I dislike John Calipari’s style, the dude can coach. Kentucky will beat tourney favorite Lou- isville and make it to the Elite 8. Also, don’t be surprised when Iowa makes it out of the play-in game and upsets Duke to make it to the Sweet 16. • Sweet 16: Kentucky, Louisville, Iowa and Michigan • Elite 8: Michigan will defeat Kentucky Final Four Michigan State will defeat Florida. Arizona will defeat Michigan. Champion Tom Izzo’s Spartans are healthy, ready and too much for anyone to handle. Good luck with your brackets. And if you have comments on this or anything to do with sports, contact me at chad.t.jones.civ@ mail.mil, or hit me up on Twitter @ctjibber. Which way to go Chad T. Jones, Public Affairs Officer Jibber Jabber - OpinionSports Shorts Spring sports Registration for spring sports is underway at Parent Central Services, 1900 Reece Road. Spring sports include soccer, swimming, baseball, track, flag football and basketball. Participants can register at the CYSS Central Registration Office at 1900 Reece Road or online at https://webtrac.mwr.army.mil/webtrac/meadecyms.html. For more information, call 301-677-1149 or 1156. Flag Football Child, Youth and School Services’ Youth Sports is now offering NFL Flag Football through USA Football for ages 6 to 13. Cost is $55 per player and includes an NFL-branded jersey, flag football belt, game shorts and participation trophy. Two practices and one game will be held each week at the Fort Meade Youth Sports Complex. Games will played Friday evenings. Flag football will be played as a spring and fall sport. For more information, call 301-677-1329 or 301-677-1179. Dollar Days Dollar Days at the Lanes is every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bowlers receive a game of bowling, shoe rental, a hot dog, hamburger, small fries, pizza slice or small soda for $1 each. For more information, call 301-677-5541. Texas Hold ‘em Texas Hold ‘em no buy-in games are played Mondays and Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Lanes. Games are free and open to the public. For more information, call 301-677-5541. For more Fort Meade sports, visit quickscores.com/ftmeadesports. Have an improvement? Your comments and suggestions will help maintain the quality of excellence on Fort Meade. ICE Interactive Customer Evaluation Visit: https://ice.disa.mil
  12. 12. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 13 Community News Notes The deadline for Soundoff! community “News and Notes” is Friday at noon. All submissions are posted at the editor’s discretion and may be edited for space and grammar. Look for additional community events on the Fort Meade website at www. ftmeade.army.mil and the Fort Meade Facebook page at facebook.com/ftmeade. For more information or to submit an announcement, email Philip Jones at philip. h.jones.civ@mail.mil or call 301-677-5602. Women’s History Month Observance Fort Meade and First Army Division East invite the community to attend the annual Women’s History Month Observance today from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at McGill Training Center, 8542 Zimborski Ave. Admission is free and open to the public. The keynote speaker is Dr. Christine Altendorf, director of the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Office, Army G-1 in Washington, D.C. For more information, call Sgt. 1st Class Torey Palmore at the Equal Opportunity Office at 301-677-6687. Religious retreat A religious retreat will be held Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Fort Meade Catholic Community Chapel Center, 7100 Rockenbach Road. Check-in begins at 8 a.m. Registration is free. Find out how young service members, ages 18 to 30, respond to spiritual questions. The event is sponsored by the Archdiocese for the Military Services USA, a member of the Charis Ministries Retreat Partner Program at milarch.org. Charis is a Jesuit ministry to those in their 20s and 30s (charisministries.org). Limited child care is available for children ages 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call Sheila at 301-677-6038 or email sheila.m.stewart.civ@ mail.mil. For more information about the event and to register, go to http://goo.gl/Be0xOz, or call Tara at 571-339-9582 or email retreatinfodcva@gmail.com. Tax Center update The Joint Installation Tax Center has saved more than $387,800 in filing fees, generated more than $3 million in tax refunds, and has saved the average client more than $300 in tax preparation fees. The deadline to file the federal 2013 tax return is April 15. Active-duty personnel, military retirees and their dependents can schedule an appointment to have their taxes prepared at 301-677-9366. Proclamation signing The Fort Meade community is invited to attend the garrison commander’s proclamation signing for Child Abuse Prevention Month on April 2 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Soldier and Family Assistance Center, 2462 85th Medical Battalion Ave. The event will feature entertainment and presentations by child abuse-prevention experts. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call Army Community Service at 301-677-5590 or go to www.ftmeademwr.com. Death notice Anyone having claims against or indebtedness to the estate of Senior Airman Christian Miltersen should contact 1st Lt. Dan Bond, Summary Court officer, at 240-373-6186. Vet services The Fort Meade Veterinary Services is now open Mondays through Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 2018 20th St., off Annapolis Road. Two veterinarians are now available. A doctor sees every patient. An evening clinic is offered monthly on the first Tuesday from noon to 8 p.m. The following surgeries are offered: spay, neuter, dental, and mass removal. Call early. The office books up fast due to Fort Meade’s large military pet population. For more information, call 301-677-1300. Karaoke Night The next Karaoke Night is Friday at 7 p.m. in the 11th Frame Lounge at the Lanes. The free event is held the third Friday of the month For more information, call 301-677- 5541 or visit ftmeademwr.com. Team Trivia Team Trivia for teams of two to 10 players is held every Thursday at 7 p.m. in the 11th Frame Lounge at the Lanes. For more information, call 301-677- 5541 or visit ftmeademwr.com. Jummah prayers Individuals interested in participating in Jummah prayers on Fort Meade should call 301-677-1301. Fort Meade has a room available at Argonne Hills Chapel Center, 7100 Rockenbach Road. The community also is seeking individuals to join in a morning prayer on Fridays. Professional development, gala The Rocks Inc., an Army officer and civilian professional development organization, hosts the 2014 National Leadership and Training Forum scheduled for March 27-29 at the Officers Club, Fort Belvoir, Va. The 40th Annual Spring Gala will be held March 29 at 6 p.m. at the Army- Navy Country Club Arlington. Senior leaders participating include: Gen. Daniel Allyn, commanding general, U.S. Army Forces Command; and Gen. Dennis Via, commanding general, U.S. Army Materiel Command. The 2014 forum theme is “Leading and Excelling in a Time of Transformation.” The forum includes educational and professional development sessions, and exhibits designed to enhance the professional knowledge of attendees. Dress for the professional development is business attire or duty uniform, and formal dress for the gala. Registration fees are waived for ROTC cadets and civilians. For registration information, including lodging information, go to therocksinc.org. Resiliency seminar The Fort Meade garrison will host a two-day resiliency seminar for Army and joint service military and DoD civilian leaders (company level and higher) from May 12-13 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at McGill Training Center, 8452 Zimborski Ave. Approximately 70 slots are available. It’s important to take quality time to share critical skills that strengthen our warriors’ health and wellness, promote trust among service members and leaders, establish a culture of resiliency, reduce negative incidents, and ultimately improve and maintain force readiness. • Day 1: Hunt the Good Stuff, Avoid Thinking Traps, Energy Management, and Active Constructive Responding, Mental Skills Foundations, Sustainment Training, and Goal-Setting. • Day 2: Hunt the Good Stuff Deliberate Breathing, Operational and Institutional Resilience, Detect Icebergs, NEWS EVENTS EDUCATION CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
  13. 13. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil14 SOUNDOFF! March 20, 2014 Community News Notes Attention Control, Put It In Perspective, Integrating Imagery, Discussion Setup/ Implementation Plan This is a unique course that will con- tinue on a regular basis based on the participation of Team Meade partners. RSVP to Linda Winkels at linda. m.winkels.civ@mail.mil or call 301-677- 4719. or Chris Thiel at christopher.w.thiel. civ@mail.mil or call 301-677-4381. For more information, visit http://csf2. army.mil/exec-course.html. Women leaders summit Building Resilience in Women Leaders Summit will be held March 27 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Arlington, Va. Objectives are to understand the skills needed to be a resilient woman leader, and to utilize a goal-setting model to lay out necessary resilience skill development, leadership skills, and opportunities to advance both in the workplace and personal life while mentoring. The summit is for women in the military: active-duty, National Guard or Reserve commissioned officer, warrant officer or enlisted service member. For more information, go to http:// events.signup4.com/Resillience2014. Free classes The Navy Fleet and Family Support Center offers a variety of classes at its new facility at 2212 Chisholm Ave. The free classes are open to DoD identification cardholders including active- duty service members, retirees and their family members, DoD civilian employees and contractors. Registration is required for each class. • Gambling Awareness: Monday, 1-3 p.m. • Interviewing Skills: Tuesday, 9 a.m. to noon This workshop teaches basic interviewing skills and tips on dressing for success. Learn the dos and the don’ts at job interviews, and strategies on how to successfully work a job fair. • Credit Management: March 31, 1-3 p.m. • Financial Counseling: available every Monday To register or for more information, call 301-677-9017 or 301-677-9018. OSC scholarship applications The Fort Meade Officers’ Spouses’ Club has posted its 2014 scholarship applications on its website at www. fortmeadeosc.org/scholarships. College-bound, high school seniors and dependent children currently enrolled in college can apply for the merit scholarship. High school seniors with an outstanding academic record also will be considered for the Etta Baker Memorial Scholarship. A Military Spouse Scholarship is also available. Applications must be postmarked by April 1. Read the eligibility requirements carefully before applying. For more information, email the OSC scholarship chair at scholarships@ fortmeadeosc.org. ESC scholarship The Fort Meade Enlisted Spouses’ Club has posted its 2014 scholarship applications on its website at FtMeadeesc.org. High school seniors and students currently enrolled in college who are dependents of a military member of any rank or branch who is on active duty, deceased, a Reservist or in the National Guard can apply for the scholarships. High school seniors with an outstanding academic record and volunteer community service will be considered for the Evelyn J. Silva Scholarship of Excellence. Sponsors for all scholarships must reside in the Fort Meade area. Applications and all required documentation must be received by March 28 at the ESC, PO Box 105, Fort Meade, MD 20755, attn: Scholarship Director Gerry Humphrey. Storytime The Children’s Library at Kuhn Hall offers pre-kindergarten Storytime on Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at the Children’s Library in Kuhn Hall, 4415 Llewellyn Ave. The free event features stories, songs or a finger-puppet theme. • Today: “Spring into a Good Book” - Storytime about spring • March 27: “Reading Makes Us Happy” - Stories, songs and fingerplay about bunnies For more information, call 301-677- 5522. Game Night The Youth Center is sponsoring several events for grades six to eight: • Appetizer Night: Friday, from 6-8 p.m. Youths will create a variety of appetizers. • Grilling Chilling: March 28, from 6- 8 p.m., features hamburgers, hot dogs and beverages. Participants must register at the center. For more information, call 301-677- 1437. Romp ‘n Stomp Romp ‘n Stomp playgroup for children age 5 and younger and their parents meets Tuesdays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. from September to June at the Youth Center EDUCATION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 YOUTH April 20 - Postwide Ecumenical Easter Sunrise Service – 7 a.m., Chapel Center Protestant Services April 13 – Palm Sunday Episcopal Service – 8:30 a.m., Post Chapel April 13 – Palm Sunday Traditional Protestant Service – 10:30 a.m., Post Chapel April 13 – Palm Sunday Contemporary Protestant Service – 10:30 a.m., Cavalry Chapel April 13 – Palm Sunday Gospel Protestant Service – 11 a.m., Chapel Center April 16 – Living Last Supper (hosted by Gospel Congregation) – 7 p.m., Chapel Center April 18 – Tenebrae Service of Shadows – 2 p.m., Post Chapel April 20 – Easter Sunday Episcopal Service – 8:30 a.m., Post Chapel April 20 – Easter Sunday Traditional Protestant Service – 10:30 a.m., Post Chapel April 20 – Easter Sunday Contemporary Protestant – 10:30 a.m., Cavalry Chapel April 20 – Easter Sunday Gospel Protestant Service – 11 a.m., Chapel Center Catholic Services March 21 28, April 4 11 – Stations of the Cross Lenten Supper – 6:30 p.m., Chapel Center April 13 – Palm Sunday Masses – *Regular Sunday Mass Schedule April 17 – Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord’s Supper – 7 p.m., Chapel Center April 18 – Good Friday Stations of the Cross – noon, Chapel Center April 18 – Good Friday Celebration of the Lord’s Passion – 7 p.m., Chapel Center April 19 – Holy Saturday Easter Vigil – 8 p.m., Chapel Center April 20 – Easter Sunday Masses – *Regular Sunday Mass Schedule *Regular Catholic Weekend Mass Schedule: Saturday: 5 p.m. Cavalry Chapel; Sunday: 9 a.m. Chapel Center; 12:15 p.m. Post Chapel. There will be no 5 p.m. Mass at Cavalry Chapel on Holy Saturday, April 19. Regularly scheduled noon Mass will be held at the Post Chapel, except April 17 and 18. Spring religious services on Fort Meade
  14. 14. http://www.ftmeade.army.mil March 20, 2014 SOUNDOFF! 15 MoviesCommunity News Notes The movie schedule is subject to change. For a recorded announcement of showings, call 301- 677-5324. Further listings are available on the Army and Air Force Exchange Service website at www.aafes.com. Movies start Fridays and Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. (The Fort Meade Theater will no longer be open on Wednesdays and Thursdays.) PRICES: Tickets are $5.50 for adults (12 and older) and $3 for children. 3D Movies: $7.50 adults, $5 children. Today through March 30 Friday: “Winter’s Tale” (PG-13). A burglar falls for an heiress as she dies in his arms. When he learns that he has the gift of reincarnation, he sets out to save her. With Colin Farrell, Jessica Brown Findlay, Russell Crowe. Saturday: “That Awkward Moment” (R). Three best friends find themselves where we’ve all been - at that confusing moment in every dating rela- tionship when you have to decide, “So...where is this going?” With Zac Efron, Michael B. Jordan, Miles Teller. Sunday: “Endless Love” (PG-13). The story of a privileged girl and a charismatic boy whose instant desire sparks a love affair made only more reckless by parents trying to keep them apart. With Gabriella Wilde, Alex Pettyfer, Bruce Greenwood. March 28: “12 Years a Slave” (R). In the ante- bellum United States, Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery. With Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Lupita Nyong’o. March 29: “Robocop” (PG-13). In 2028 Detroit, when Alex Murphy - a loving husband, father and good cop - is critically injured in the line of duty, the multinational conglomerate OmniCorp sees their chance for a part-man, part-robot police officer. With Joel Kinnaman, Gary Old- man, Michael Keaton. March 30: “Pompeii” (PG-13). A slave-turned- gladiator finds himself in a race against time to save his true love, who has been betrothed to a corrupt Roman Senator. As Mount Vesuvius erupts, he must fight to save his beloved as Pom- peii crumbles around him. With Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland gym at 909 Ernie Pyle St., and from June to August at the Boundless playground on Llewellyn Avenue. For more information, call 301-677-5590 or email colaina.townsend.ctr@mail.mil. Out About • Howard County General Hospital is sponsoring a panel discussion on “Weighing in on Your Child’s Weight” for parents and guardians with overweight children on Tuesday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Howard County General Hospital Wellness Center, 10710 Charter Drive, Suite 100, Columbia. Pediatrician Edisa Padder, psychiatrist Robin Toler, dietician Ashli Greenwald and exercise specialist Suzie Jeffreys will offer tips and tools to help children reach a healthier weight. The panel discussion is free and open to the public. Questions for the panel may be submitted in advance to HCGH_news@ jhmi.edu. For more information and to register, go to www.hcgh.org/events or call 410- 740-7601. • Springtime in the Woods is being held through April 6 at Rockfield Manor, 501 Churchville Road in Bel Air. Hours are Monday to Thursday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event features handicrafts, collectibles, antique furniture, decorations, florals, jewelry, children’s accessories and toys, gifts and specialty foods. For more information, call 443-829- 5902 or go to www.christmasinthewoods. com/splash.htm. • Beer, Bourbon BBQ Festival will be held Friday from 5:30-10 p.m. and Saturday from 1-6 p.m. at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium. Admission is $25-$89 and includes a sampling glass. Children ages 12 and under are free. The event will feature 40 kinds of beer, 40 bourbons and barbecue vendors; performances by Annapolis Blue Grass Coalition, Kelly Bell Band and the Amish Outlaws; seminars with master distillers, brewmasters and pit masters; and contests. For more information, call 410-252- 0200 or go to www.beerandbourbon.com/ maryland/show-info. • The 2014 Carroll County Home Show, an exhibition of home and garden products and services, will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Carroll County Agriculture Center-Shipley Arena, 706 Agriculture Center Drive, Westminster. Admission costs $4. For more information, call 410-857-7869 or go to carrollcountytimes.com/marketing/home_ show. • Leisure Travel Services is offering its next monthly bus trip to New York City on Saturday, with discounts to attractions. Bus cost is $60. For more information, call 301- 677-7354 or visit ftmeademwr.com. • Air Force Sergeants Association Chap- ter 254 meets the fourth Wednesday of the month from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the multipur- pose room of Building 9801 at the National Security Agency. The next meeting is Wednes- day. For more information, call 443-534-5170 or visit afsa254.org. • Prostate Cancer Support Group meets at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda on the third Thursday of every month. The next meeting is today from 1 to 2 p.m. and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the America Building, River Conference Room (next to the Prostate Center), third floor. Spouses/partners are invited. Military ID is required for base access. Men without a military ID should call the Prostate Center 48 hours prior to the event at 301-319-2900 for base access. For more information, call retired Col. Jane Hudak at 301-319-2918 or email jane. l.hudak.ctr@health.mil. • Society of Military Widows meets for brunch the fourth Sunday of the month at 1 p.m. at the Lanes. The next meeting is Sunday. For more information, call Betty Jones at 410-730-0127. • Calling All Dads meets the second and fourth Monday of every month from 4 to 5 p.m. at Potomac Place Neighborhood Center, 4998 2nd Corps Blvd. The next meeting is Monday. The group is for expecting fathers, and fathers with children of all ages. Children welcome. For more information, call 301- 677-5590 or email colaina.townsend.ctr@ mail.mil. • Single Parent Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday of the month from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at School Age Services, 1900 Reece Road. The next meeting is Mon- day. Free child care is provided onsite. For more information, call 301-677-5590 or email colaina.townsend.ctr@mail.mil. • Bully Proofing Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday of the month from 4 to 5 p.m. at Potomac Place Neighbor- hood Center. The next meeting is Monday. The group is geared for school-age children and parents. For more information, email Kimberly.d.mckay6.ctr@mail.mil. • Marriage Enrichment Group, sponsored by Army Community Service, meets the second and fourth Monday of every month from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Community Readi- ness Center, 830 Chisholm Ave. The next meeting is Monday. For more information, call Celena Flowers or Jessica Hobgood at 301-677-5590. • Retired Officers’ Wives’ Club will sponsor its next monthly luncheon on April 1 at 11 a.m. at Club Meade. The event’s annual “Spring into Summer” fashion show features fashions from the Fort Meade Exchange modeled by ROWC models. Cost of luncheon is $18. Reservations are required by March 27 at noon. For reservations, call your area representative or Betty Wade at 410-551-7082. Membership dues are $25 per year, but you may join from February through May now for half price. Members may bring guests at any time to the luncheons, which are held on the first Tuesday of each month, except June, July, August, and January. For more information, call Genny Bellinger, ROWC president, at 410-674-2550. • Monthly Prayer Breakfast, hosted by the Garrison Chaplain’s Office, is held the first Thursday of every month at 7 a.m. at Club Meade. The next prayer breakfast is April 3. There is no cost for the buffet; donations are optional. All Fort Meade employees, family members, and civilian and military personnel are invited. For more information, call Diana Durner at 301-677-6703 or email diana.l.durner.civ@ mail.mil. • Meade Rod and Gun Club meets the first Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at Perry’s Restaurant and Odie’s Pub at 1210 Annapolis Road, Odenton, in the banquet hall in back of the building. The next meeting is April 3. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. For more informa- tion, call 410-674-4000. • National Alliance on Mental Illness of Anne Arundel County offers a free support group for families with a loved one suffering from mental illness on the first Thursday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Odenton (West County) Library, 1325 Annapolis Road. The next meeting is April 3. For more informa- tion, visit namiaac.org. • Families Dealing with Deployment meets the first and third Monday of every month from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Meuse Forest Neigh- borhood Center. Children welcome. The next meeting is April 7. For more information, call 301-677-5590 or email colaina.townsend. ctr@mail.mil. RECREATION MEETINGS

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