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Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
Ed Prof St612 2010 Short
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Ed Prof St612 2010 Short

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Presentation of Prof. Stephen May on August 3 2010 at the Faculty of Education University of Auckland.

Presentation of Prof. Stephen May on August 3 2010 at the Faculty of Education University of Auckland.

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  • 1. Language and Diversity: Challenges and possibilities
    Prof. Stephen May
    School of Critical Studies in Education (CRSTIE)
    Faculty of Education
    University of Auckland
    August 5, 10
    1
  • 2. August 5, 10
    2
    It has been known for some time that secondary teachers do not consider reading and learning to be issues that are of much importance to them.
    (Gunderson 2000: 692)
  • 3. August 5, 10
    3
    The problem of monolingualism
    Particularly evident in English-dominant countries like New Zealand
    A result of English as the current world language
    Ignores the history (and politics) of English
  • 4. August 5, 10
    4
    Key Challenges in teaching bilingual students
    Developing and fostering an additive rather than subtractive view of bilingualism
  • 5. August 5, 10
    5
    Subtractive bilingualism
    views bilingualism as problematic
    judges students by native (L1) English norms
    Constructs bilingual students as incompetent (in English)
    e.g. NESB; this child has ‘no language’
    Excludes the L1 in the teaching and learning process (‘time on task’ principle)
  • 6. August 5, 10
    6
  • 7. August 5, 10
    7
  • 8. August 5, 10
    8
  • 9. The first response
    Building specifically from/on the students’ language backgrounds
    Developing an ‘additive’ view of students’ bilingualism
    Drawing on all the language registers/domains of students in the teaching and learning process
    August 5, 10
    9
  • 10. Additive bilingualism
    Recognises bilingual students as multicompetent
    Accords with research on the cognitive, social and educational advantages of bilingualism
    Cognitive flexibility
    Metalinguistic awareness
    Communicative sensitivity
    Accords with the linguistic interdependence principle
    The more developed the L1, the easier the development of the L2; the less developed the L1, the harder the development of the L2
    August 5, 10
    10
  • 11. August 5, 10
    11
    1. Implications for teaching
    How can we challenge/change deficit constructions of bilingual students?
    How can we recognise and value our students’ extensive language competencies?
    How can we foster use of L1 in our classes in order to enhance metalinguistic awareness and language interdependence?
    How can we address our own knowledge gaps (and monolingualism)?
  • 12. August 5, 10
    12
    Key challenges in teaching bilingual students
    2. Recognising that academic English is a specific language register, and that we need to teach it explicitly
  • 13. August 5, 10
    13
    Academic English
    Is significantly more demanding than conversational English
    Cf.
    Conversational competence (BICS)
    Develops within 1-2 years
    Academic language proficiency (CALP)
    Takes 5-8 years to develop fully
    = 2nd language learning delay
  • 14. August 5, 10
    14
    Academic English
    Is more abstract
    Has more passive constructions (e.g. It has been argued by May that … vs. …. Stephen says that)
    Is more decontextualised
    Has specific patterns of classroom language
    IRE (initiation - response - evaluation)
    IRF (initiation - response - feedback)
    Which are also culturally located (with students having varying degrees of familiarity with them)
    Has more difficult vocabulary
  • 15. Vocabulary A-S nouns G-L nouns
    August 5, 10
    15
  • 16. August 5, 10
    16
    2. Implications for teaching
    How can we apprentice students into academic English?
    How can we scaffold learning more effectively?
    How can we avoid ‘dumbing down’ (amplifying, not simplifying)
    How can we vary existing classroom discourse patterns
    IRE (initiation; response; evaluation)
    IRF (initiation; response; feedback)
    Group work
  • 17. August 5, 10
    17
    Group Work
    Learners hear more language
    Learners use more language (fosters exploratory talk; increased output)
    Learning is contextualised (language is used appropriately and meaningfully)
    Learning and comprehension are supported (message redundancy)
    In addition, group work
    Can include both L1 and L2
    Is culturally congruent for many groups
    Facilitates language use in contextualised / integrated ways (linking language and content)
    However, still requires explicit framing/instruction
  • 18. August 5, 10
    18
    Cognitively Undemanding
    A B
    (conversation) (email/texting)
    Context Embedded Context Reduced
    C D
    (group work/journaling/
    role play) (classroom discourse)
    Cognitively Demanding
  • 19. August 5, 10
    19
    Key References
    Language Enhancing the Achievement of Pasifika (LEAP). http://leap.tki.org.nz
    May, S., Hill, R. & Tiakiwai, S. (2004) Bilingual/Immersion Education: indicators of good practice (available at http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/schooling/5075
    See also:
    Gibbons, P. (2002). Scaffolding Language, Scaffolding Learning: teaching second language learners in the mainstream classroom. Heinemann.

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