Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Cultures clash on the prairie
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cultures clash on the prairie

3,031

Published on

US History Ch.5 sec1

US History Ch.5 sec1

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,031
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Ch.5 Sec.1<br />Pg.202<br />Cultures Clash on the Prairie<br />
  • 2. The Plains Indians<br />Great Plains: grassland extending through the west-central portion of the U.S. (pg.205)<br />After Spanish brought horses and guns, NA’s were able to travel farther and hunt more efficiently<br />Began hunting buffalo <br />NA’s lived in small extended family groups<br />Men hunted, women prepared hides and butchered meat. Some with spiritual sensitivity became medicine men/women (Shamans)<br />Leaders led by council, not by force and land was common property<br />
  • 3. Settlers Move West<br />Settlers claimed great plains were “unsettled” because NA’s did not “improve” it<br />Settlers began moving west and settling NA land<br />Gold was discovered in Colorado in 1858<br />Thousands migrated to mine for gold<br />Boomtowns created- filthy, dirt roads, tents and shacks<br />
  • 4. Restrictions of Native Americans<br />Government began to designate specific reservations for each tribe in 1850 causing clashes<br />Massacre at Sand Creek: 1864 Colonel John Chivington attacked a Cheyenne reservation and killed over 150 NA’s (mostly women and children)<br />Death on the Bozeman Trail: 1866 Sioux wanted settlement to stop on their hunting trail. Crazy Horse attacked Captain William Fetterman and killed over 80 Soldiers<br />Treaty of Fort Laramie: the trail was closed by Sioux were forced to live on a reservation along the Missouri River<br />
  • 5. Battles Against Natives<br />Red River War: 1874-1875 war broke out between two NA tribes and U.S. The Army herded all friendly tribes onto reservations and opened fire on all others destroying villages.<br />Custer’s Last Stand: a gold rush began in the Black Hills led by Colonel George A. Custer, but Sioux met them at Little Bighorn River and crushed Custer’s troops. <br />
  • 6. Assimilation<br />Assimilation: a plan in which NA’s would become part of white culture<br />The Dawes Act: 1887 Broke up reservations and gave some of the land to individual NA’s. Remaining land would be sold and money used by NA’s to buy farm supplies. In the end they received no money.<br />Tourists and fur traders began to hunt buffalo for sport making NA main source of food, clothes, and income nearly extinct<br />
  • 7. Battle of Wounded Knee<br />Because of the Ghost Dance movement, US military leaders killed Sitting Bull<br />350 Sioux were rounded up and taken to camp at Wounded Knee Creek in S. Dakota<br />NA’s were order to give up their weapons when a shot was fired (which side is unclear)<br />Soldiers opened fire and killed 300 unarmed NA’s, including children, and left the corpses to freeze on the ground<br />Brought the Indian Wars to an end<br />
  • 8. Cattle and Ranching<br />Lifestyle learned from Spanish ranchers in Mexico<br />Raised Texas longhorns for food<br />Spanish Rancho= American Ranch<br />Vaquero-Spanish cowboy. First to wear spurs, &amp;chaps, and eat jerky<br />Demand for beef grew after Civil War because of growing cities. <br />Ranchers herded cattle to Sedalia. Railroads were running cattle from Sedalia, MO to Chicago. <br />The Cow Town: Joseph McCoy created a shipping yard where trails and rail lines came together in Abilene, Kansas.<br />Chisholm Trail: Major cattle route from San Antonio, TX through Oklahoma to Kansas. Soon ranchers were hiring cowboys to run their cattle to Abilene.<br />
  • 9. Cowboys<br />25% were African-American, 12% Mexican<br />Worked 10-14 hour days on a ranch and 14 or more on the trail<br />Cowboy season began with spring roundup, in which they herded all the longhorns they could find into a large corral where they were penned until they were really hungry. They were sorted and branded.<br />They transported cattle overland (long drive). Took about 3 months and 1 cowboy per every 250 cattle, 1 cook, 1 wrangler, and a trail boss<br />Very dangerous, and dirty work. Always risk of a stampede or illness.<br />Overgrazing and dry summers wiped out whole herds bringing a quick end to the open west by 1887<br />

×