Mark Rolston@DMI: Embrace the Coarse Process
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Mark Rolston@DMI: Embrace the Coarse Process

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Mark Rolston, chief creative officer at frog design, argues in this presentation, given at the DMI conference 2009, that the time is ripe for "less design thinking and more design doing." He ...

Mark Rolston, chief creative officer at frog design, argues in this presentation, given at the DMI conference 2009, that the time is ripe for "less design thinking and more design doing." He highlights the importance of craftsmanship and calls for an agile concept of design strategy that embraces both the ambiguity and the materiality of the creative process.

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Mark Rolston@DMI: Embrace the Coarse Process Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Rethinking Design Embrace The Coarse Process Mark Rolston Chief Creative O cer
  • 2. “Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” Elvis Costello 2
  • 3. The Fog of War "The great uncertainty of all data in war is a peculiar di culty, because all action must, to a certain extent, be planned in a mere twilight, which in addition not infrequently — like the e ect of a fog or moonshine — gives to things exaggerated dimensions and unnatural appearance." Carl von Clausewitz, Prussian military analyst, 1800’s 3
  • 4. “The implicit assumption that thinking is somehow removed from the act of design itself. That is, if we get some really smart folks together to ponder and brainstorm paradigm shifts, great stu will come from it. This is mildly delusional at best.” Bob Brunner, in Fast Company 4
  • 5. embrace the coarse process 5
  • 6. The market for innovation: What do we have and what do we want? 6
  • 7. what we had 7
  • 8. what we wanted 8
  • 9. what we had 9
  • 10. what we wanted 10
  • 11. what we have 11
  • 12. what we want 12
  • 13. 13
  • 14. 14
  • 15. “so then, a modern strategic design program should do the trick, right?” 15
  • 16. The era of design superstars 16
  • 17. The big idea 17
  • 18. 18
  • 19. 19
  • 20. 20
  • 21. But the problem has changed 21
  • 22. We want simplicity 22
  • 23. 23
  • 24. MEX: Personalization © 2009 frog design. Confidential & Proprietary.
  • 25. MEX: Personalization © 2009 frog design. Confidential & Proprietary.
  • 26. MEX: Personalization © 2009 frog design. Confidential & Proprietary.
  • 27. The physical object loses functional identity © 2009 frog design. Confidential & Proprietary.
  • 28. it can be anything you want it to be Open Systems Invite Innovation © 2009 frog design. Confidential & Proprietary.
  • 29. phone = computer = netbook = MID... general computing / communications / lifestyle / entertainment... 29
  • 30. A white box 30
  • 31. A white box 31
  • 32. A white box 32
  • 33. agnostic in form, time, place, and purpose 33
  • 34. what if there is no box? 34
  • 35. 35
  • 36. a ordance overhead 36
  • 37. a ordance overhead Randall Munroe xkcd.com 37
  • 38. how can we innovate in this new context? 38
  • 39. embrace the coarse process 39
  • 40. design by intent is waterfall thinking (determinism) 40
  • 41. who wants to be standing here? 41
  • 42. A map may have a structure similar or dissimilar to the structure of the territory. A map is not the territory. - Alfred Korzybski, 1931 42
  • 43. 43
  • 44. 44
  • 45. design with intent is working in the territory, not trying to perfect the map 45
  • 46. jump in, get dirty! 46
  • 47. craftsmanship 47
  • 48. craftsmanship 48
  • 49. “We consider that the architects in every profession are more estimable and know more and are wiser than the artisans, because they know the reasons of the things which are done.” Aristotle 49
  • 50. craftsmanship 50
  • 51. Plato observed that although ‘craftsman are all poets…they are not called poets, they have other names” Plato 51
  • 52. craftsmanship 52
  • 53. “The hand and head divided” Richard Sennett 53
  • 54. We discover elegant solutions more e ectively than conjuring them 54
  • 55. tacit knowledge 55
  • 56. Soviet and Japanese models of craftsmanship 56
  • 57. Soviet Construction Industry 57
  • 58. Japanese Total Quality Control 58
  • 59. While Marx dealt with “the worker” The Japanese dealt with “the work” Text 59
  • 60. designing with the material rather than upon it 60
  • 61. Technology People Processes material Politics Money oh, and actual ”materials” 61
  • 62. 62
  • 63. 63
  • 64. 64
  • 65. failure points discover design deliver strategy and design research then development team folks do their thing, defining the vision, then the designers design it (software and hardware) the solution, and the requirements builds it 65
  • 66. discover design deliver strategy and design research then development team folks do their thing, defining the vision, then the designers design it (software and hardware) the solution, and the requirements builds it 66
  • 67. ! insight design build convergence of convergence of insight with design design with development 67
  • 68. ! insight design build convergence of convergence of insight with design design with development 68
  • 69. 69
  • 70. Best Business/Productivity Application, People’s Choice Award 70
  • 71. 72
  • 72. my recommendations: (six of them) 73
  • 73. encourage tacit knowledge (Plans are no substitute for the real thing) 74
  • 74. create a culture of doing as much as, if not more, than thinking. 75
  • 75. embrace the discomfort and ambiguity of the creative process (the fog) ...even the chaos 76
  • 76. you don’t know shit. (demand perpetual curiousity and the willingness to course correct) 77
  • 77. remember there is a point to all this... process is a means to an end. Our purpose is to create. 78
  • 78. Embrace The Coarse Process