Technology and Creativity
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Presentation for the launch of launch of a creative industries strategy and signing of a partnership agreement between Macedonian Government bodies in Skopje.

Presentation for the launch of launch of a creative industries strategy and signing of a partnership agreement between Macedonian Government bodies in Skopje.

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  • Catalyst for inter disciplinary communities around strategic innovation themes . Exploring future innovation challenges and opportunities. Generating and sharing innovation insight, knowledge as the basis for projects and collaborations. Signposting and awareness raising (newsletter/content and sharing).
  • A national body supporting business innovation... for business benefit.. for economic growth.. for quality of life..
  • Music Digital accounted for 55.5% of UK trade revenues in Q1 2012 – overtaking physical for first time growth in digital music revenues boosted the record industry ’ s overall market value by 2.7% to £155.8m, offsetting a decline in revenues from physical products. Paid-for subscription services also performed strongly with income almost doubling (93%) year-on-year to just under £9 million as users migrate to premium, paid-for tiers Games The UK video games industry contributes some £1 billion to national GDP each year. 216 games companies started up in the UK market between 2008 and 2011 The UK games sector is projected to grow by 7.5 per cent between 2009 and 2012 80 per cent of the new UK games businesses that have been set up over the last two years are developing games for online digital distribution Advertising   Internet advertising revenues for the first quarter of 2012 set a new record for the reporting period at $8.4 billion, according to the latest IAB Internet Advertising Report from the Interactive Advertising Bureau  “ a 15 percent increase over the comparable period in 2011 is a solid affirmation the internet is delivering on its promise to attract consumers and the advertising dollars that follow. ” Television UK TV is now 100% Digital The estimated total revenue from the international sale of UK TV programmes and associated activities was £1.42 billion in 2010, a 13 per cent increase on 2009. revenue from the a new generation of online video services, fuelled by faster broadband ISP connectivity, to quadruple by 2020 new services (e.g. Netflix , YouView  etc.) will begin to eat away at the established market.
  • The TSB The Role of the KTN Challenge of maintaining the profile of the Creative Industries Wider Design Agenda The presentation
  • provide a trusted source of knowledge on technology and market developments and provide the mechanisms for creative businesses to explore potential impacts and opportunities; promote partnerships between business and academia through collaborative projects and Knowledge Transfer Partnerships; signpost creative businesses to other support-agencies within the broader innovation landscape and, where needed, develop the mutual understanding necessary to facilitate successful relationships; promote multidisciplinary cross- fertilisation between the Creative Industries sector and other technology and market application areas supported by the Technology Strategy Board; transfer creative industry know-how to other sectors, in particular to apply design thinking and creative industry solutions to societal and industry challenges.
  • Innovation in the sector is pervasive and iterative, highly collaborative, project-based and informal. Non-linear and multi-disciplinary, new projects and services are developed out of rapid iteration, open to inputs from unexpected sources Successful innovation is strongly user-focused. Understanding how technology can be adapted and used is critical to the development and exploitation of that technology. Some of the most successful innovations over recent decades have been built around an understanding of and engagement with human behaviour Content is key. Innovation is driven by the desire to create new experiences for users and audiences, often rooted in story or emotion; creative businesses develop technology in pursuit of that end. It is almost impossible to separate content and format from technological development. The culture of a place is important, and how business ideas are generated and engaged with. Successful innovation tends to benefit from a combination of the ‘ street ’ and the ‘ lab ’ – informal networking and facilitated interaction, integrated into more formal modes of operation This has implications for governance as well as facilities: there needs to be a greater level of engagement with small companies at every stage, and an openness to the different ways in which innovation happens among small dynamic creative and digital businesses.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • I’ve been in post only for a couple of months; this is my first outing in that position so this is very much a prototype talk. I hope it makes some sense and doesn’t go on for too long. In the dying days of 2011, the UK government apparently reduced its view of the value of the Creative Industries. DCMS published a new statistical estimate of the economic contribution and size of the UK’s Creative Industries for 2009,  lowering it from 5.6% of GVA to 2.9% or from £59.1bn to £36.3bn. What I’ve been doing today: creative industries is no longer a particularly helpful term because it is based on a 20 th century model of the activity and the business models in the sectors described. They’re changing radically, dynamically new kinds of skill, knowledge and business are emerging.
  • A national body supporting business innovation... for business benefit.. for economic growth.. for quality of life..
  • Innovation in the sector is pervasive and iterative, highly collaborative, project-based and informal. Non-linear and multi-disciplinary, new projects and services are developed out of rapid iteration, open to inputs from unexpected sources Successful innovation is strongly user-focused. Understanding how technology can be adapted and used is critical to the development and exploitation of that technology. Some of the most successful innovations over recent decades have been built around an understanding of and engagement with human behaviour Content is key. Innovation is driven by the desire to create new experiences for users and audiences, often rooted in story or emotion; creative businesses develop technology in pursuit of that end. It is almost impossible to separate content and format from technological development. The culture of a place is important, and how business ideas are generated and engaged with. Successful innovation tends to benefit from a combination of the ‘ street ’ and the ‘ lab ’ – informal networking and facilitated interaction, integrated into more formal modes of operation This has implications for governance as well as facilities: there needs to be a greater level of engagement with small companies at every stage, and an openness to the different ways in which innovation happens among small dynamic creative and digital businesses.
  • A national body supporting business innovation... for business benefit.. for economic growth.. for quality of life.. for the UK to be a global leader in innovation and a magnet for innovative businesses, where technology is applied rapidly, effectively, and sustainably, to create wealth and enhance quality of life.

Transcript

  • 1. Creative Industries KTNaccelerating innovationFrank BoydDirector 1
  • 2. Technology Strategy Boardsupporting business innovationInvested over £2 billion in 4 yearsLaunched over 2000 R&D PartnershipsSupported over 4000 businessesAnd most of the UK’s universitiesReaching out to SMEsLaunchpad, Feasibility Studies, R&D GrantsInitiating Catapult ProgrammeTechnology Innovation Centres 2
  • 3. UK Creative Industriesdigital is changing everythingMusicDigital 55.5% of revenues in Q1 2012Overtakes physical sales for the first timeGamesWorth over £1 Billion annually, growing at 7.5%Over 200 new companies in the past 2 yearsAdvertisingInternet revenues of $84 billion in Q1 201223% of all advertising spend in the UKTelevisionRevenue growing at over 10%, £1.4 billion in 2010Income from online services to quadruple by 2020 3
  • 4. Agenda Item 1 & 2 Minutes and Welcome 4
  • 5. Creative Industries KTNaccelerating innovation byproviding a trusted source of knowledge ontechnology and market developmentspromoting partnerships betweenbusinesses and with academia throughcollaborative projects;signposting other support and collaboratewith other agencies;promoting interdisciplinary cross-fertilisation and transfer creative industryknow-how to other sectors 5
  • 6. Creative Industries KTNcurrent themesConvergenceTransmedia, Internet of Things, Cross-sectorExperience Led InnovationUser Centred DesignFinance and InvestmentConnecting investors with creative SMEsBusiness ModelsInnovation, Rights Frameworks, Cross Sector 6
  • 7. Convergence: Changing Platforms, Changing behaviours convergence is blurring the boundaries between sub-sectors and creating new challenges and opportunities 7
  • 8. Convergence: transmedia: building ‘story worlds’producers create universes that provide platforms for telling multiple stories in which the user can become a participant and creator, not just a consumer 1. Minutes 8
  • 9. Crossplatform Case Study: TV Documentary: Hugh’s Fish Fight“We could have done [it] as a television show alone but extending the campaign across platforms increased the public impact. Part of the story was the 700,000 people who signed the petition online.” 1. Minutes 9
  • 10. TV and Social Media Platforms The Second Screen: ZeeBoxa free app on your laptop, tablet or phone: it knows what youre watching, it shows you what your friends are watching. It can give you more information about what youre watching, instantly. It lets you buy and download relevant stuff.. 10
  • 11. Keeping Attention: The Second Screen: Secret Fortuneviewers play a quiz on their smartphones to compete in real time with a studio audience. 11
  • 12. Transmedia and Film Marketing on other platforms: 221b 1. Minutesa game launched before the film release to deepen engagement and attract new audiences. 2. Welcome to Frank Boyd 3. CIKTN2 Progress Against Business Plan 12
  • 13. Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds The Internet of Things the number of connected objects will reach 50bn by 2020 and thepotential added value of services enabled by the Internet of Things is in the hundreds of billions of pounds a year. 13
  • 14. Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds ideas made real with 3D printingcompanies are developing platforms to enable designers to connect directly with users, designers create ‘choice architectures’ allowing users to customise objects to their own needs. 14
  • 15. Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds MakieLabmaking a new kind of future-smashing toy: customisable, 3D-printed, locally made, and game-enabled.. 15
  • 16. Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds Physical Interfacesincreasingly interactive entertainment occurs in spaces that connect the digital and physical. 16
  • 17. Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds Augmented Reality turning any product, advert, logo or physical landmark into an interactive experience simply by pointing a phone at it.. 17
  • 18. Crossing Sectors Year Zero: online health applicationapplying the knowledge, skills and approaches of creative businesses to the development of products and services in other sectors: healthcare, energy, future cities 18
  • 19. Experience Lead Innovationa philosophy which aims to create great products by basing design decisions on an understanding of user need 19
  • 20. Technology Strategy Boardsupporting business innovation 20
  • 21. Innovation in the Creative IndustriesIterativeInnovation in the sector is pervasive and iterative, highly collaborative, project-based and informal.User Centredmost successful innovations are based on an understanding of and engagement with human behaviourContent and Story DrivenCreative businesses do not develop technology in a vacuumInterdisciplinaryCollaboration between people with different skillsets, from different professional cultures is key 21
  • 22. Creative Industries KTNQuestions?connect.innovateuk.org/web/creativektn@frnboyfrank@creativeindustriesktn.org. 22