Francesco Venier- Future Forum 2013
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  • 1. COME LAVOREREMO (E VIVREMO) NEL FUTURO? Scarica la presentazione da: http://bit.ly/futureforum2013venier FRANCESCO VENIER +39 040 9188 103 venier@univ.trieste.it www.checovenier.com Docente di Social Media Strategy and Personal Branding @ MIB School of Management www.mib.edu Docente di Organizational Behavior and Design @ Università di Trieste www.units.it
  • 2. What is going on under our eyes
  • 3. Some data on an healthy economy
  • 4. Annu. l Pt · ductivity·~Cha tnge in the I ion-·a1rm a ro N f Business.S.e ctor b~y De· ade,1· S0s-2000s c 9 3.0% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.2% 2 .1% L7% 1.6% 0.5% 0 .0% - 1950-59 1960-69 1970-79 1980-89 Fii· ure 3 ..1: Prod uctivity g1ow th has been g row ing. g r Statisti1 cs. 1.990-99 Source~ 2000-09 BurHau of Labor
  • 5. +13% in 40 years +71% in 15 years
  • 6. l 1n ~dex ~o~f ~Gr~o,wth IR~e ,al 190 in U.S~. Rea1 GDP per Cap~ita1 a1 l nd Mledia1 Hlous~eho~l ~d n lll nc~ome,, 119'75~2008~ Real GDP per Capita 170 ... o o 160 150 Il a.n ...... ... - 140 '" a 130 Ql x ai r: - 120 / ' ..... -.... .... --- ... """ .,. ' ' Re . l · "a Medlian ! ouseholdl H 110 ~ncome 100 l 1975 197'8 1981 1.984 1987 l l 1990 l 1993 l l l 1996 l l 1999 l l 2002 l 2005 l l 2008 Fii gure 3,3: Reali GD, per ~ca[pita has ~g rown s i gJ i fica.ntly f'a ster than reali median . P n household in com1 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics. e.
  • 7. 45% ,...,, 35% l / l . J-.;'' h / 2 ·if'IL)./ . V 7'0 ...._ l _,~ il!l "t l940s~, 37.7 % ,. , ";' ,. , ., ,_,.. / ~ ,.. ,. 1960s, 31. 1% -- -19705, 27.6% ,..!' 1950s, 24. 7%, 19:80.s, 20~ 2% 1990s, 19. a% l (" c.. "" ,. ' l . ,- r / - l ~~ ' )'v l o > l ,.,. l E 4! .. 15% l J * z lo& J6 .§ G.! lbO 1: (1111 5% é ::.E: G 0% 2000s, -1.1% -5% 1 2 3 6 Year ~n Decade 7 8 9 10 Figu re 3 .4~: In tlhe ne'W mi~ lenni um, j ~ob g r~owt:h stalll s. Sou ree: BtJrea u of Labor StatDsties_
  • 8. U ,S. I e, l C~orp~orate Pr~ofits, AfterTa1 19~9~0-·2010 . R a x, (· ith w lnv~entory va~lua1tion a1 1n~d ~consum~pti~on Capitai Adj ustm1 ents ) 1 $1,600 $1,400 $1,200 $1,000 'Ili .fi = ·- $800 11:1:1 $f!()0 $400 $200 $0 198'0 1995 Fii gu r· 3.6:: Proflits soar in 'the e Ana lys~s. 2000 2005 curtr~e nt re~co·v·ery. Sour~oe: 2010 Bureau of Economie
  • 9. US Manufacturing, 1970-2010 Value Added vs Employment 2,000 - 25,000 - 1,800 ~ c: ~ c: o 1,600 a5 - '(/). 20,000 ... ~ 1,400 c: 'tl OJ OJ 'tl 'tl < OJ :l 1,200 15,000 a.Q c: Q. w a.Q 10,000 800 :l ('IS c: 'i: ... v :l ' i: ... v -5 c: E > .9 E 1,000 nJ > .Q ·- ('IS 600 :l c: 400 5,000 ~ ('IS ~ ~ :::> 200 o 1970 o 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
  • 10. Changes irn Wa;ge~s for F1iiii-T'ime, F1uii~Year, I a le u M U.S. Wo~r·ker~s,, 1 196~3-2 1008, 0.6 Graduate Schor l o 0.5 I Ì(Ir 'llliQ "' .. 11!1 3: 0.4 : '':!i:ir rli ,~, =:: IIQ IQ!r College Graduate l 0.3· ~l l 'i iii '"' D:: Some . 11111 l ,f i l • t M I1j<• , il ~.. . ·.., ~ ~ .. ... ,. , ...... College ' ....... , , ,., ...... School ·. ..,.... l·. .. ~ •• • • • • i •• .Il! l • • iii ., • • . , •• Gimdlllait 'e •• • •if!•ltl li • • • itì -.,.- -0.1 1963 1968 1978 1983 1988 1993 Hligh 1.998 2003 2008 High S<:hool Dnlpcut ! ir ure 3.5: Wa, es, hav~e· inc1eased 'f or those w'itlh the 1 ost edurcati,on ~ whillr fall ling Fg g r m e f: r thos,e· · itih1thte· llea.st~ Souroe~: Acemoglu end Autor , nalys,is o, the Current o w a f Popu~a1Uon Suruey · or ·1963-2008. r
  • 11. Unemployment rate, by education, 2007 and 2011 ::oc) • 2007 201 1 17.8% ISr:, l h':. l·l'i:> ... CII (Q ~ J"W _) c: CII E 11 .1% 10.3% I O~:·. ~ 8.6% .2 Q. E 8l;, CII c: => 6~*' 5.4% 5.2% 4.000 3.3% •t ~";', 2.4% .. 1./% 2r: H1::;h s.:hoo 1 Sour<e: t. > aia~js.s of b)SJC rto"''thV Cu·rerr l'op1.dat1•Jn 1 )U r J-?"i m'ctoJ ata
  • 12. What is the cause of this more and more uneven income distribution and employment crisis/ stagnation?
  • 13. A Disconcerting Perspective
  • 14. The Second Half of the Chessboard —  The Google car(truck?) —  IBM Deep Blue beats Kasparov 1997 —  IBM Watson wins Jeopardy 2012 —  Text readers/ Pattern recognition (goodbye legions of lawyers -only 60% accurate) —  Automated ‘call centers’ (goodbye offshoring) —  GeoFluent (goodbye translators) —  Vending machines for … everything > Retail jobs disappearing
  • 15. What about more creative jobs as musical composition or poetry?
  • 16. “ … The audience then voted on the identity of each composition.* [Music theory professor and contest organizer] Larson’s pride took a ding when his piece was fingered as that belonging to the computer. When the crowd decided that [algorithm] Emmy’s piece was the true product of the late musician [Bach], Larson winced.” —Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World *There were three: Bach/Larson/Emmy-the-algorithm.
  • 17. “ … Which haiku are human writing and which are from a group of bits? Sampling centuries of haiku, devising rules, spotting patterns, and inventing ways to inject originality, Annie [algorithm] took to the short Japanese sets of prose the same way all of [Prof David] Cope’s. algorithms tackled classical music. ‘In the end, it’s just layers and layers of binary math, he says. … Cope says Annie’s penchant for tasteful originality could push her past most human composers who simply build on work of the past., which, in turn, was built on older works. …” — Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World
  • 18. “Software Seen Giving Grades on Essay Tests” —Headline, p 1, New York Times /0405.13
  • 19. “Algorithms have already written symphonies as moving as those composed by Beethoven, picked through legalese better than a senior law partner, diagnosed patients with more accuracy than a doctor, written news articles with the smooth hand of a seasoned reporter, and driven vehicles on urban highways with far better control than a human driver.” —Christopher Steiner: Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule the World
  • 20. “A bureaucrat is an expensive microchip.” —Dan Sullivan, consultant and executive coach
  • 21. “The median worker is losing the race against the machine.” —Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, The Race Against the Machine
  • 22. “The root of our problem is not that we’re in a Great Recession or a Great Stagnation, but rather that we are in the early Great Restructuring. times of a Our technologies are racing ahead, but our skills and organizations are lagging behind.” Source: Race AGAINST the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  • 23. “In some sense you can argue that the science fiction scenario is already starting to happen. The computers are in control. We just live in their world.” —Danny Hillis, The Connection Machine
  • 24. The three effects of technology on work •  Technology is developed in order to be “substitutive” of work. But this is just technology’s first loop effect. •  The innovation changes the roles (hence the power) of people and enables two second loop effects that are human centered and empower us to shape the future of work with unprecedented freedom. These effects are: “Integrative” & “Innovative”
  • 25. Technology has always changed work (and society) •  •  •  •  Agriculture -> Urban Civilization Writing -> Philosophy Press -> Science Steam Engine -> Industrial Revolution •  Electric & Internal combustion engines •  Jet Engine and Radio/TV •  Computer/Internet -> Knowledge Economy •  Social Technologies – Big Data … ->???
  • 26. Consider this ...
  • 27. Te n years ago there were no soci al networl<s. ® space • l facebook. rnY friends aptacefor
  • 28. Ten years before that we didn•t have the Web.
  • 29. lf you in the web programming, online marketing, or mobile p hone industries ...
  • 30. Who l<nows what jobs will exist twenty years from now?
  • 31. 12 disruptive technologies
  • 32. Next-generation genomics Energy storage .......~····... Fast, low-cost gene sequencing, advanced big data analytics, and synthetic biology ("writing" DNA) Devices or systems that store energy for later use, including batteries _...:····... ~ 30 printing ..·.............· ~ ...:· ..... Additive manufacturing techniques to create objects by printing layers of materia! based on digitai models Advanced materials Advanced o il an d gas exploration and recovery 1,,, ....._.1~ ,,, 1 Materials designed to have superior characteristics (e.g. , strength, weight, conductivity) or functionality Exploration and recovery techniq ues that make extraction of unconventional oil and gas economica! Renewable energy Generation of electricity from renewable sources with reduced harmful climate impact ~-~ SOUI CE: McKinsey Global lnstitute analysis R
  • 33. Speed, scope, and economie value at stake of 12 potentially economically disruptive technologies Illustrative rates of technology improvement and diffusion Mobile Internet Illustrative groups, products, and resources that could be impacted 1 Illustrative pools of economie value that could be impacted 1 $5 million vs. $4002 4.3 billion $1.7 trillion Price of the fastest supercomputer in 1975 vs. that of an iPhone 4 today, equal in performance (MFLOPS) People remaining to be connected to the Internet, potentially through mobile Internet $25 trillion 6x Growth in sales of smartphones and tablets since launch of iPhone in 2007 1 billion Transaction and interaction workers, nearly 40% of global workforce GDP related to the Internet lnteraction and transaction worker employment costs, 70% of global employment costs ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Automation of knowledge work 100x 230+ million $9+ trillion lncrease in computing power from IBM's Deep Blue (chess champion in 1997) to Watson (Jeopardy winner in 2011 ) 400+ million lncrease in number of users of intelligent digitai assistants like Siri and Google Now in last 5 years Knowledge workers, 9% of global workforce 1.1 billion Smartphone users, with potential to use automated digitai assistance apps Knowledge worker employment costs, 27% of global employment costs ···~ -- ~·~·~ · ~·······i~i~·;~·~i- ~i··········3·ao%···························································································· :; ·i~i-iii·~~································································;s36" i~i-iii~;;························································· ~~ ~~ ~'~ ~ Things lncrease in connected machine-to-machine devices over past 5 years 80_90 % Price decline in MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) sensors in last 5 years Things that could be connected to the Internet across industries such as manufacturing, health care, and mining 40 million Annual deaths from chronic diseases like Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease Operating costs of key affected industries (manufacturing , health care, and mining) $4 trillion Global health care spend on chronic diseases ·········~~~~~;:;········f~~-~~~h:~~-~=·~:~:;·:~~::~~:~·;:;·~:;1·~;·················-~~:::··-···-···-···-···-··-···f~=~~·::-:::~·-··-···-···Monthly cost of owning a server vs. renting in the cloud Servers in the world 75-85% 320 million Lower price for Baxter3 than a typical industriai robot Manufacturing workers, 12% of global workforce 250 million Annual major surgeries Enterprise IT spend .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Advanced robotics 170% Growth in sales of industriai robots, 2009--11 $6 trillion Manufacturing worker employment costs, 19% of global employment costs $2-3 trillion Cost of major surgeries
  • 34. DOWNLOAD THE FULL MGI REPORT: - http://bit.ly/19AEOnt
  • 35. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 1. The power to invent (and execute) is switching/ flipping rapidly/inexorably to the network. “Me” is transitioning to “We”—as consumers and producers. Nouns are giving way to gerunds—it’s an “ing”/ shapeshifting world! 2. The Internet must stay open and significantly unregulated to enable, among other things, the entrepreneurial spurt that will significantly underpin world economic growth. 3. Entrepreneurial behavior and upstart entrepreneurial enterprises have underpinned every monster shift in the past, such as farm to factory. This time will likely be no different. 4. An obsession with a “Fortune 500” of more or less stable giants dictating “the way we do things” will likely become an artifact of the past. (Though big companies/"utilities" will not disappear.)
  • 36. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 5. There is simply no limit to invention or entrepreneurial opportunities! (Please read twice.) 6. The new star bosses will be “wizards”/“maestros.” 7. Sources of sustained profitability will often be elusive in a “soft-services world.” 8. Control and accountability will be a delicate dance. Now you see it, now you don't ... 9. Trial and error, many many many trials and many many many errors very very very rapidly will be the rule; tolerance for and delight in rapid learning—and unlearning—will be a/ the most valued skill.
  • 37. “We are in no danger of running out of new combinations try. Even if technology froze today, we have more possible ways of configuring the different applications, machines, tasks, and distribution channels to create new processes and products than we could ever exhaust.” —Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy
  • 38. “Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource.” —Richard Florida
  • 39. “The prospect of contracting a gofer on an a la carte basis is enticing. For instance, wouldn’t it be convenient if I could outsource someone to write a paragraph here, explaining the history of outsourcing in America? Good idea! I went ahead and commissioned just such a paragraph from Get Friday, a ‘virtual personal assistant- firm based in Bangalore. … The paragraph arrived in my in-box ten days after I ordered it. It was 1,356 words. There is a bibliography with eleven sources. … At $14 an hour for seven hours of work, the cost came to $98. …” —Patricia Marx, “Outsource Yourself,” The New Yorker, 01.14.2013 (Marx describes in detail contracting out everything associated with hosting her book club — including the provision of “witty” comments on Proust, since she hadn’t had time to read the book—excellent comments only set her back $5; the writer/contractor turned out to be a 14year-old girl from New Jersey.)
  • 40. “Be the best. It’s the only market that’s not crowded.” From: Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America, George Whalin
  • 41. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 10.  “Gamers” instinctively “get” the idea of lots of trials, lots of errors, as fast as possible; for this reason among many, “the revolution” is/will be to a very significant degree led by youth. 11. Women may well flourish to the point of domination in new leadership roles in these emergent/ethereal settings that dominate the landscape—power will be exercised almost entirely indirectly (routine for most women—more than for their male counterparts), and will largely/elusively inhabit the network per se. 12. The “Brand You/Brand Me” idea is alive and well and getting healthier every day and is … not optional. Fact is, we mostly all will have to behave/be entrepreneurial tapdancers to survive let alone thrive. (Again, the under-35 set already seem mostly to get this; besides, this was the norm until 90 years ago.)
  • 42. MMORPG/ Massively Multiplayer Online RolePlaying Games Source: Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  • 43. “The popularity of an unwinnable game like Tetris completely upends the stereotype that gamers are highly competitive people who care more about winning than anything else. Competition and winning are not defining traits of games—nor are they defining interests of the people who love to play them. Many gamers would rather keep playing than win. In high-feedback games, the state of being intensely engaged may ultimately be more pleasurable than the satisfaction of winning.” —Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  • 44. “It may have once been true that computer games encouraged us to act more with machines than with each other. But if you still think of gamers as loners, then you’re not playing games.” — Jane McGonigal, Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
  • 45. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 10.  “Gamers” instinctively “get” the idea of lots of trials, lots of errors, as fast as possible; for this reason among many, “the revolution” is/will be to a very significant degree led by youth. 11. Women may well flourish to the point of domination in new leadership roles in these emergent/ethereal settings that dominate the landscape—power will be exercised almost entirely indirectly (routine for most women—more than for their male counterparts), and will largely/elusively inhabit the network per se. 12. The “Brand You/Brand Me” idea is alive and well and getting healthier every day and is … not optional. Fact is, we mostly all will have to behave/be entrepreneurial tapdancers to survive let alone thrive. (Again, the under-35 set already seem mostly to get this; besides, this was the norm until 90 years ago.)
  • 46. “I speak to you with a feminine voice. It’s the voice of democracy, of equality. I am certain, ladies and that this will be the women’s century. gentlemen, In the Portuguese language, words such as life, soul, and hope are of the feminine gender, as are other words like courage and sincerity.” —President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, 1st woman to keynote the UN General Assembly
  • 47. Bachelor’s degree, age 25-34: 40% F; 30% M Graduate degree students: 60% F; 40% M Source: Sydney Morning Herald /26.03.12
  • 48. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 10.  “Gamers” instinctively “get” the idea of lots of trials, lots of errors, as fast as possible; for this reason among many, “the revolution” is/will be to a very significant degree led by youth. 11. Women may well flourish to the point of domination in new leadership roles in these emergent/ethereal settings that dominate the landscape—power will be exercised almost entirely indirectly (routine for most women—more than for their male counterparts), and will largely/elusively inhabit the network per se. 12. The “Brand You/Brand Me” idea is alive and well and getting healthier every day and is … not optional. Fact is, we mostly all will have to behave/be entrepreneurial tapdancers to survive let alone thrive. (Again, the under-35 set already seem mostly to get this; besides, this was the norm until 90 years ago.)
  • 49. Circa 2013: Coming to Believe 13. Individual performance and accountability will be more important than ever, but will be measured by one’s peers along dimensions such as reliability, trustworthiness, engagement, flexibility, willingness to spend a majority of one’s time helping others with no immediate expected return. 14. ICT is ripping through traditional jobs at an accelerating pace. Virtually no job, no matter how “high end,” will remain in a recognizable way within 15-25 years. It’s as simple— and as traumatic—as that. 15. Wholesale/continuous/intense re-education (forgetting as well as learning) is a lifelong pursuit/imperative; parent Goal #1: Don’t kill the curiosity with which the child is born!
  • 50. +400,000*/-2,000,000** “new computing technologies that destroy middle-class [whitecollar] jobs even as they create jobs for highly skilled workers who can exploit them” *Managerial jobs added USA 2007-2012 **White-collar jobs lost USA 2007-2012 Source: Financial Times, page 1, 0402.13 (“Clerical Staff Bears Brunt of US Jobs Crisis”)
  • 51. “I believe that ninety percent of whitecollar jobs in the U.S. will be either destroyed or altered beyond recognition in the next 10 to 15 years.” (Tom Peters 22 May 2000/ Time magazine)
  • 52. China too/Foxconn: 1,000,000 robots in next 3 years Source: Race AGAINST the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  • 53. Fab Labs/Fabrication Labs/Fabulous Labs/digital fabrication machine/ parts themselves are digitalized/ 3-D printer /MIT Center for Bits and Atoms/ Prof Neil Gershenfeld/ $5K: “large-format computer-controlled milling machine can make all the parts in an IKEA flatpack box” customized for the individual/Etc./Etc. Source: “How to Make Almost Anything,” Beil Gershenfeld, Foreign Affairs/11-12.2012
  • 54. Multiple Choice Examination You will lose your job to; choose one … (1)  An offshore contractor? (2)  A computer? (White collar) (3)  A robot? (Blue collar) Source: Adapted from Dan Pink
  • 55. Multiple Choice Examination You will lose your job to; choose one … (1)  An offshore contractor? (2)  A computer? (White collar) (3)  A robot? (Blue collar) (4) A re-tooled value-added “Brand You”? Source: Adapted from Dan Pink
  • 56. “Knowledge becomes obsolete incredibly fast. The continuing professional education of adults is the No. 1 industry in the next 30 years … mostly on line.” —Peter Drucker
  • 57. "The illiterate of the 21st Century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn." —Alvin Toffler
  • 58. We need “Figure it Out” Jobs “With GE’s future success dependent on creative innovation, we are now continually making such demands of our people. We expect employees to thrive in uncertainty, take initiative, and respond resiliently when their ideas fall short.” •  Beth Comstock 2013 Chief Marketing Officer @ General Electric
  • 59. “You must realize that how you invest your human capital matters as much as how you invest your financial capital. Its rate of return determines your Take a job for what it teaches you, not for what it pays. Instead of a potential employer asking, ‘Where do you see yourself in 5 years?’ you’ll ask, ‘If I invest my mental assets with you for 5 years, how much will they appreciate? How much will my portfolio of career options grow?’ ” —Stan Davis & Christopher Meyer, future options. futureWEALTH
  • 60. (1) People first! (2) Value through creativity! (3) Entrepreneurial ubiquity!
  • 61. “All human beings are entrepreneurs. When we were in the caves we were all selfemployed . . . finding our food, feeding ourselves. That’s where human history began . . . As civilization came we suppressed it. We became labor because they stamped us, ‘You are labor.’ We forgot that we are entrepreneurs.” —Muhammad Yunus/ The News Hour/PBS/1122.2006
  • 62. “We are CEOs of our own companies. ME inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called you” Tom Peters
  • 63. INTEGRATIVE + INNOVATIVE
  • 64. SOCIAL TECHNOLOGIES AHEAD
  • 65. Social Technologies •  We define Social Technologies as digital technologies that share three characteristics: 1.  Are enabled by information technology 2.  Provide distributed right to create, add and/or modify content 3.  Enable distributed access to consume content
  • 66. Social technologies incllude a broad range of applications that can be used both by consumers and enterprises Upload, share, and comment on photos, videos, and audio Keep connected through personal and business profi1 les Connect with friends and strangers to play games Harness collective knowledge and generate collectively derived answers Co-create content; coordinate joint projects and tasks Discuss topics in open communities; rapidly access expertise l NOT EXHAUSTIVE PubHsh and discuss opinions and experiences Social analytics 1 Evaluate andrate products, services, and experiences; share opinions Purchasing in groups, on social platforms, and sharing opinions Search, create and adapt articles; rapidly access stored knowledge 1 Social analytics is the practice of measuring and analyzing interactions across social techno l og~y platforms to inform decisions. SOURCIE : McKinsey Globallnstitute analysis
  • 67. Ten ways social technologies can add value in organizational functions within and across enterprises ----------------------------------------: 0 Organizational functions Derive customer insights 1 : Across enti re enterprise 9 l ----------------------------------------J 1 Co-create products 2 3 Derive customer insights 5 Use social technologies for marketing comm unicationlinteraction 6 Generate and foster sales leads 7 Business support2 Use social to distribute business processes 4 Customer servi ce Leverage social to forecast and monitor Social commerce 8 Use social technology to improve intra- or inter-organ izational collaboration and communication Provide customer care via social technologies 10 Use social technology to match talent to tasks lmprove collaboration and communication ; match talent to tasks3 1 Deriving customer insights for product development is included in customer insights (lever 4) under marketing and sal es. 2 Business support functions are corporate or administrative activities such as human resources or finance and accounting. 3 Levers 9 and 1O apply to business support functions as they do across the other fun ctional value areas. SOURCE: McKinsey Global lnstitute analysis
  • 68. Potential value and ease of capture vary across sectors IUS EXAMPLE e Directional HigherJ Relati1V9 size of G DP contribution Software ~ Education-e and Internet • Professional services Health care providers Pha rmaceuticals • Value potenti al e Energy Consumer products Food and beverage processmg Lo ca l ' National Chemicals government Lower Media and entertainment • Banking Transportation lnsurance manufacturing wholesale Construction Higher Lower Ease of capturing value potential SOURCE: McKinsey Global lnstitute analysis l
  • 69. Value available through collaborati1 and other benefits of on social technologies varies across industries • Collaboration Other benefits o/o 63 49 57 48 38 30 CPG P&C Life Retail insurance insurance banking SOUI CE: McKinsey Global l nstitute anall ysis R 34 24 Professional serv1ces SemiAuto conductors Aerospace Average
  • 70. What is the groundswell? “A social trend in which people use technologies to get the things they need from each other, rather than from traditional institutions like corporations.”
  • 71. 140 CHARACTER TWEETS SENT EVERY SINGLE DAYON TWITTER. TWITTfR l 2011
  • 72. 1/8 MINUTES ONLINE IS SPENT ON FACEBOOK. COMSCORE l FEBRUARY 2011
  • 73. APRI L 2009 - MAY 201 O 13% INCREASE 88% INCREASE 100%
  • 74. 9 OF lO INTERNET USERS VISIT SOCIAL NETWORKS MONTHLY. COMSCORE l FEBRUARY 2011
  • 75. read blogs monthly
  • 76. more time spent with social media than email.
  • 77. pieces of content shared o n Facebook month ly
  • 78. IT’S A CHANGED WORKERS-SCAPE
  • 79. IT’S A CHANGED MANAGER-SCAPE
  • 80. SO…
  • 81. What is the FUTURE OF WORI<?
  • 82. - - - -. -- , - The future of work is... ---- ~ --==--~~-----=--- ------ - --- -- - - - - 1 -~ TRANSPARENT D
  • 83. No o ne is going to just tal<e your word far it. t l
  • 84. Now, ti me an d tasl< tracl<ing tools are revolutionizing productivity measurement.
  • 85. The more productively you worl<, the more money you'll mal<e.
  • 86. rk,
  • 87. The only options for communication were landline phones or snail mai l.
  • 88. Today, project teams use amazing web tools
  • 89. Tools lil<e Sl<ype have made long-distance calling virtually free.
  • 90. The world is now flat.
  • 91. ''f•·u.~ l .' '( ~ ~
  • 92. …or, better, will matter in a new way!
  • 93. And informai education is more accessi bi e than ever.
  • 94. MOOCs like Coursera.org, Udacity.org give courses online for FREE From TOP Universities like MIT, Stanford, Harvard… http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/04/booming/answers-for-middle-aged-seekers-of-moocs-part-1.html http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/11/booming/advice-for-middle-age-seekers-of-moocs-part-2.html
  • 95. lt is commonplace to h ire vendors an d contractors fra m across the planet.
  • 96. One in four organizations plans to increase spending an outsourcing by 25°/o or more this year. SOURCE
  • 97. According to interviews with more than 500 executives, the l<ey benefit of outsourcing
  • 98. io stav empoved n the wor<pace of the future
  • 99. Many businesses are choosing over hiring new employees.
  • 100. The word "career" is as outdated as the word "typewriter". Career
  • 101. lndependent individuals with unique talents get together to worl< o n a company's project.
  • 102. At the end, they ali go their separate ways. They might worl< together aga in in the future. They might not.
  • 103. lt's a whole new paradigm.
  • 104. So why should you consider this?
  • 105. lndividuals will have more freedom an d power than ever before. l i
  • 106. Employers will h ave access to a larger and more sl<illed worl<force.
  • 107. A BRAND CALLED YOU
  • 108. = = :E ·- ~·=-~ c.,~ '-::: = §; -- ca ,...., res onsible -~ n.,§ i l l ~ 8 c= l = - • eu • "bi VISI eu e.· memorable • ' l '» • • exciting
  • 109. Our business in life is not to get ahead of others, butto get ahead of ourselves '' + ~ Email Me Professar of management @ Trieste University Associate Dean far Executive Education @ mib.edu Business model innovation scholar and management education architect ... but also local food heritage entrepreneur, slowfood, wine, travel & photography addict, BMW GS biker an d yes, F16 fighter pilot ;-) My purpose ls to enable people and organlzatlons to defy outmoded business models by lnnovatlng management practlces through the professlonal use of soclal technologles Latest Posts Just Make a
  • 110. Bibliografia (ita) •  Brynjolfsson E., McAfee A. (2011) In gara con le macchine: La technologia aiuta il lavoro? http://amzn.to/16vh8TF •  Donkin R. (2012) Il futuro del lavoro http://bit.ly/FuturoDelLavoro •  Hoffman R., Cosnocha B. (2013) The Start-up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career http://bit.ly/SARTUPOFYOU •  Li C. & Bernoff J. (2011) Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies http://bit.ly/GroundswellLiBernoff •  McGonigal, J. (2010) La Realtà in Gioco: Perchè I giochi ci rendono migliori e possono cambiare il mondo http://bit.ly/RealtaInGioco •  Moretti E. (2013) La nuova geografia del lavoro http://amzn.to/17TIj62 •  Steiner C. (2012) Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World http://bit.ly/AutomateThis