Trail Construction and Use-Conflict Minimization Overview
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Trail Construction and Use-Conflict Minimization Overview

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Part of the Royal Gorge Public Outreach Process. John Svahn, Stewardship Director of the Truckee Donner Land Trust, and Randy Martin, Owner of Trailscape put on a presentation about Trail Construction ...

Part of the Royal Gorge Public Outreach Process. John Svahn, Stewardship Director of the Truckee Donner Land Trust, and Randy Martin, Owner of Trailscape put on a presentation about Trail Construction and Use-Conflict Minimization.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • This a fantastic presentation and in my opinion a great case for an extensive network of primarily multi-use trails. Sorry I missed the presentation to SLPOA last Sunday!
    -John Sarter
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  • Erosion consists of two components: disturbance and transport. Horses and hikers: High level of disturbance, low level of transport Bikes: low level of disturbance (unless skidding), high level of transport
  • Water bars are out
  • Construction of sustainable trails allows for more durable trails, less maintenance work Clear drains, “ to daylight” Clear deadfall discreetly Prune brush at an angle Reconstruct tread: maintain backslope and critical edge, restore outslope Grade dips
  • These pictures don’t show the guilty activity
  • It also says that contact between users need not be made The “level of resentment is often lopsided”
  • Even Day/Odd Day use management Ordnance vs. recommendation
  • Can lead to “trail vigilanteism” by empowering the entitled user
  • Check out sawtooth, DLRT from Castle, emigrant to summit for good design Check out Mt. Lala Trail steps, Confluence Trail in Auburn for bad design
  • Road analogy
  • A non-skidding bike is one of the lowest impacts on trails

Trail Construction and Use-Conflict Minimization Overview Presentation Transcript

  • 1. For Royal Gorge Public Process July 21, 2013
  • 2. Introduce Randy Martin of Trailscape Why trails? The Real Estate Value Added of Trails  The parts of the trail Presentation on use conflict and the causes of it How to manage use via designations How to manage use via design
  • 3. Sample Projects 14 miles Multiuse trail Susanville Ca. 2009 14 Miles Hiking Primarily Trail, Genoa 2011 Guest Trail Builder Jamaica, 2009 Sugarbowl, 6 miles design, 2 miles built from Disney to Lake Mary, 2010 Tahoe Donner, Euer Valley, 2 miles, 2012 Market Studies and Premium Analysis Advisory Board Hidden Falls Regional Park, CA Frequent Speaker: California Trail Symposium California Park and Recreation Society, Urban Land Institute International Trail Symposium Professional Trail Builders Association Professional Highlights
  • 4. • Brings people to a place of interest • Keeps people away from sensitive areas • Meet recreational needs of people • Economic benefits • Public Health • Introduce people to the outdoors
  • 5. When constructing trails, the Land Trust follows stringent federal and State standards
  • 6. Donner Summit Canyon Trail December 4, 2012
  • 7. Meandering low-gradient trails • keep speed down Grade reversals- undulations in the tread  Keep water from running down tread • Slows bikes and minimizes skidding Grade dips • Easier to build than a water bar; therefore more get built!
  • 8. • Make them smooth- no hoof or tire-catchers! • Rock-hopper stones next to it for hikers?
  • 9. • Most maintenance on modern trails occurs because of the original design and layout • A well-built trail should need mostly annual spring cleaning-not much more • Major maintenance needs after flood events (maybe) Sustainable? Sustainable
  • 10. GUILTY HAVING THE VOLUME UP TOO LOUD FOR SAFE TRAIL SHARING GUILTY TRAMPLING STREAM BANKS AND WALKING SIDE-BY-SIDE ON SINGLE TRACKS GUILTY CUTTING SWITCHBACKS AND LEAVING ‘ROAD APPLES’ GUILTY NOT YIELDING TRAIL AND GOING TOO FAST
  • 11. Why? P.S. EXTRA CREDIT IF YOU KNOW WHAT IS WRONG WITH THIS SIGN…
  • 12. According to the Forest Service it is defined as: “Goal interference attributed to another's behavior” Huh?
  • 13. •Varying rates of speed by trail users
  • 14. Out for a workout Thrillseeking Bird/critter/wild -flower viewing Family/Friend time Enjoyment of Nature Solitude All of the above can happen here!
  • 15. Perceptions of who should rightly be able to use the trail. Lack of clarity or understanding of regulations Poaching It’d be tough to lay out a multi use route through here! Use-Conflict-Why do we have it? (cont’d)
  • 16. Considerations in designation: •Single-user, or several users? •Resource preservation and/or use-conflict mitigation? •Ordinance or voluntary compliance? •Enforcement plan?
  • 17. The Good: Segregates use however designed Provides a level of security against potential use-conflict Allows a clear line for enforcement Can mitigate erosion by singling out high impact users (particularly on older, non-sustainable trail) The bad: Does not necessarily mitigate user conflict; may actually cause an increase in it More trails to satisfy all users= redundancy, larger footprint of impacted area, greater costs Tough to enforce
  • 18. The Good: Less trails needed= less impact to watershed Easier navigation Use conflict minimized through design Larger pool of potential funders and volunteers for construction and maintenance Easier enforcement The bad: Varying rates of speed by users WILL occur Design critical to minimization of use-conflict Potential for user-group dominance
  • 19. Sustainable design employs: Low overall gradient Maximum grades determined by soil type Follows contours Meanders designed to slow users Lots of grade reversals* * But not to the point of having P.U.D.’s Design is critical on this section of trail as there is no place to yield
  • 20. •Slow fast-paced trail users down, provide extra durability where there is high-use
  • 21.  Multi-use trails in the backcountry- (the majority of the trails)  Single-use on flatter terrain for accessibility and walking  Single-use (proposed) trails for mountain bikes  Single-use routes (potential) for safer travel to areas with steep or exposed access.
  • 22. See you on the trail!