“Bite the wax tadpole!”
And other Branding Blunders: The importance of research.

Clairol introduced the “Mist Stick”, a c...
MARKETING STRATEGY
Getting results from your organization’s marketing has everything to do with choosing meaningful
market...
1. What are trends and changes that affect your industry?
        2. Where will you be in five years? Ten years?

   Succe...
Brand Objectives.
       •    Delivers the message clearly
       •    Confirms your credibility
       •    Connects your...
Designing Brand Identity by Alina Wheeler © 2006
COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS
Who is your biggest competition and why?
Who is NOT your competition and why?
                       ...
MARKETING INVENTORY
EXTERNAL
Newsletter/   Sales/ referral    Customer           Collateral    Web site             Direct...
MARKETING INVENTORY (CONTINUED)
NEW MEDIA
Pay Per Click     Social networking:    Other
                  FaceBook
       ...
Lyric Financial                                                                                                           ...
A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study
                                                                                        ...
Fresh Dirt Marketing                                                          A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study
          ...
A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study
                                                                                        ...
Fresh Dirt Marketing Branding Congruency DIG
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Fresh Dirt Marketing Branding Congruency DIG

  1. 1. “Bite the wax tadpole!” And other Branding Blunders: The importance of research. Clairol introduced the “Mist Stick”, a curling iron, into German only to find out that “mist” is slang for manure. Not too many people had use for the “manure stick”. Scandinavian vacuum manufacturer Electrolux used the following in an American campaign: Nothing sucks like an Electrolux. In Chinese, the Kentucky Fried Chicken slogan “finger-lickin’ good” came out as “eat your fingers off”. The American slogan for Salem cigarettes, “Salem-Feeling Free”, was translated into the Japanese market as “When smoking Salem, you will feel so refreshed that your mind seems to be free and empty”. When Gerber started selling baby food in Africa, they used the same packaging as in the US, with the beautiful Caucasian baby on the label. Later they learned that in Africa, companies routinely put pictures on the label of whatís inside, since most people canít read English. An American T-shirt maker in Miami printed shirts for the Spanish market which promoted the Pope’s visit. Instead of “I saw the Pope” (el Papa), the shirts read “I saw the potato” (la papa). In Italy, a campaign for Schweppes Tonic Water translated the name into “Schweppes Toilet Water”. Pepsi’s “Come alive with the Pepsi Generation” translated into “Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the grave”, in Chinese. We all know about GM’s Chevy Nova meaning “it won’t go” in Spanish markets. When Parker Pen marketed a ball-point pen in Mexico, its ads were supposed to have read, “it won’t leak in your pocket and embarrass you”. Instead, the company thought that the word “embarazar” (to impregnate) meant to embarrass, so the ad read: “It wonít leak in your pocket and make you pregnant”. The Coca-Cola name in China was first read as “Ke-kou-ke-la”, meaning “Bite the wax tadpole” or “female horse stuffed with wax”, depending on the dialect. Coke then researched 40,000 characters to find a phonetic equivalent “ko-kou-ko-le”, translating into “happiness in the mouth”.
  2. 2. MARKETING STRATEGY Getting results from your organization’s marketing has everything to do with choosing meaningful marketing tactics based on sound strategy and a strong brand. That’s not a new idea, but knowing how to evaluate the status of your organization, set achievable goals, choose tactics to employ and determine how they should be executed isn’t always obvious. A good foundation should be based on exploring the purpose, mission and values of your organization. Goals should be set from this research and paired with an analysis of your organization’s business situation. From this process, a plan should be created to deliver the outcome that you desire. I. RESEARCH Core Values: 1. What business are you in? 2. What is your mission? What are your three most important goals? 3. Why was the company created? 4. Describe your products or services. 5. Who is your target market? 6. Prioritize your stakeholders in order of importance. How do you want to be perceived by each audience? Competition: (complete competitive analysis) 1. What is your competitive advantage? Why do your customers choose your product or service? What do you do better than anyone else? 2. Who is your competition? Is there a competitor that you admire most? If so, why? Marketing Inventory: (complete marketing inventory) 1. How do you market your products and services? Trends: Fresh Dirt Marketing 2003 Blair Blvd, Suite 200, Nashville, TN 37212 615.279.1502 www.freshdirtmarketing.com
  3. 3. 1. What are trends and changes that affect your industry? 2. Where will you be in five years? Ten years? Success: 1. How do you measure success? 2. What values and beliefs unify your employees and drive their performance? 3. What are the potential barriers to the success of your product or service? 4. Place yourself in the future. If your company could do anything or be anything, what would it be? Messaging: 1. If you could communicate a single message about your company, what would it be? SWOT: Use the information above to complete a SWOT evaluation Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (Challenges) II. BRAND EVALUATION Definition of a brand. The American Marketing Association (AMA) defines a brand as a “name, term, sign, symbol or design, or a combination of them intended to identify the goods and services of one seller or group of sellers and to differentiate them from those of other sellers. Branding is not about getting your target market to choose you over the competition, but it is about getting your prospects to see you as the only one that provides a solution to their problem. Your brand resides within the hearts and minds of customers, clients, and prospects. It is the sum total of their experiences and perceptions, some of which you can influence, and some that you cannot. A brand is not always a company, it can be a person (i.e. Oprah) Fresh Dirt Marketing 2003 Blair Blvd, Suite 200, Nashville, TN 37212 615.279.1502 www.freshdirtmarketing.com
  4. 4. Brand Objectives. • Delivers the message clearly • Confirms your credibility • Connects your target prospects emotionally • Motivates the buyer • Concretes User Loyalty Brand architecture. This refers to the hierarchy of brands within a single company. In BMI’s case this could be the artists as sub-brands. Sub brands should mirror the parent’s strategy and support company growth. Examples are: iPod and Apple Computer Polo and Ralph Lauren Oreo and Nabisco Sesame Street and PBS What are BMI’s sub brands and how do they support the parent brand? Building a Brand. A strong brand is invaluable as the battle for customers intensifies day by day. It’s important to spend time investing in researching, defining, and building your brand. After all your brand is the source of a promise to your consumer. It’s a foundational piece in your marketing communication and one you do not want to be without. Fresh Dirt Marketing 2003 Blair Blvd, Suite 200, Nashville, TN 37212 615.279.1502 www.freshdirtmarketing.com
  5. 5. Designing Brand Identity by Alina Wheeler © 2006
  6. 6. COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS Who is your biggest competition and why? Who is NOT your competition and why? What do they do What do they do Competitor Services offered better/differently worse/differently Notes: Name & Website than you? than you? Fresh Dirt Marketing: Strategic Development Worksheet
  7. 7. MARKETING INVENTORY EXTERNAL Newsletter/ Sales/ referral Customer Collateral Web site Direct mail Mass media – Intranet campaigns information TV, Radio, tracking/ mining Print, Outdoor PR E-mail marketing Social events Sponsorship Community giving Promotional items Fresh Dirt Marketing: Strategic Development Worksheet
  8. 8. MARKETING INVENTORY (CONTINUED) NEW MEDIA Pay Per Click Social networking: Other FaceBook LinkedIn Twitter 
 STRATEGIC ALLIANCES COI planning Networking planning Other Fresh Dirt Marketing: Strategic Development Worksheet
  9. 9. Lyric Financial A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study W W W. F R E S H D I R T M A R K E T I N G . C O M PROFILE PROJECT GOALS Lyric Financial’s mission is simple, to create and offer meaningful Lyric Financial came to FDM as First financial products that nurture the growth and development of the Entertainment Financial. The first order independent music community. Lyric Financial is run by music people of business was to come up with a for music people. They understand what it’s like to worry about tour new name. We needed to come up support, or if the next royalty check is going to be enough to cover with something that fit our client’s the bills. They’ve been there and they’re here to lend a hand. At company’s personality. Since the Lyric Financial, we have the ability and understanding to create a company was still very small – without deal that’s right for the clients in the music community. multiple locations and employees - we had to draw inspiration from the owner’s vision, his own style, and that of his centers of influence. We had to balance his desire for a name that was different, and our needs to find something that was not-too-serious but not-too-risky, understandable to his target, and most importantly, not already service marked. It was quite a task. Two weeks and a half-dozen “almost” company names later, Lyric Financial was born. e the idea u really like s work? nest. Do yo lif Let s be ho ng your songs, your of selli ink so. ys) ...didn t th nancial gu (turned fi re music guysdowns and aroundsare there. We nd the ups, ess- and we We ve been o understa music busin catalog. wh er in the on to your of a care to helping you hold help you comm itted out ho w we can s), or if to talk ab your song yo u re ready ed (without selling ne who truly cares, So, when money you ne from someo 15 get the need some advice -739-65 you just Ball) 615 om g guy, Eli al.c (me, the bi l: eli@lyricfinanci call us or emai e the idea u really like s work? nest. Do yo lif Let s be ho ng your songs, your of selli ink so. ys) ...didn t th nancial gu (turned fi re music guysdowns and aroundsare there. We nd the ups, ess- and we We ve been o understa music busin catalog. wh er in the on to your of a care to helping you hold help you comm itted out ho w we can s), or if to talk ab your song yo u re ready ed (without selling ne who truly cares, So, when money you ne from someo 15 get the need some advice -739-65 you just Ball) 615 om g guy, Eli al.c (me, the bi l: eli@lyricfinanci call us or emai the idea really likees work? st. Do you t s be hone your songs, your lif Le lling of se ink so. ) ...didn t th ncial guys urned finaounds usic guys (t ar ther e. We re mthe ups, downs andand we are We ve been o understand music business- ur catalog. wh er in the on to yo of a care to helping you hold we can he lp you committed talk about howyour songs), or if ready to (without selling o truly cares, when you re eed ne wh
  10. 10. A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study W W W. F R E S H D I R T M A R K E T I N G . C O M PROCESS & STRATEGY CREATIVE SOLUTION RESULTS What we learned from our client while The logo mark for Lyric isn’t a mark Lyric’s branding efforts along with helping create his company’s name at all. In this case, we knew that the strategic alliances including the Fast- and build their strategy gave us the products would tell the story of the Forward My Royalties program offered tools we needed to take that company company, so each of them would have exclusively to BMI Members have name and make it a brand. We now their own marks. The Lyric Financial launched Lyric Financial to Success understood his company’s culture, mark is a laid-back typestyle in silver even in tough financial times. values and core beliefs. First of all, we on a black background that can be learned that at Lyric, it’s all about tak- replicated in a number of branded ing the way things are normally done colors. and turning them up side down. There were no rules - this had everything to We let these core values drive the tag do with Lyric’s brand. Lyric is a finance line penned as “Words. Music. Money.” company that serves musicians, so the Again, the Lyric Financial feel is about culture is loose – no suits allowed. The as simple as you can get because products would have cool names like banking often doesn’t seem simple FastForwardMyRoyalties. Traditional and Lyric is the “anti-bank.” “Words. banking terminology would be turned Music. Money.” describes what Lyric on its head because the founder of does – they lend money to the people Lyric Financial is a music guy turned that write the words that are made banker. Not the other way around, into music. Their market gets it, and it which is much more common on Nash- requires little to no copy support. ville’s famous Row. Lyric isn’t a bank per se, but understands the financial The decision was made to use images needs of the music industry, and that of real artists and clients on the Lyric alone makes them different and ap- website and in their advertising design. pealing. We had our core competency. We let the irreverent tone drive font se- lection and advertising and web copy. We played on the idea that many songs are written on scrap paper and the backs of napkins whenever the inspiration hits. We developed a postcard campaign that played on the “back of the napkin” idea and all the while, we kept it clean and simple. The design stays congruent and we often promote the product while keeping the Lyric Financial message secondary. It isn’t about the company; it is about what they bring to the music com- munity.
  11. 11. Fresh Dirt Marketing A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study W W W. F R E S H D I R T M A R K E T I N G . C O M PROFILE PROJECT GOALS Fresh Dirt Marketing, LLC (FDM) is a boutique marketing consulting When Holly began planning to open firm in Nashville, Tenn., created to serve small businesses and a marketing consulting business in entrepreneurs seeking strategic marketing direction and marketing early 2007, she knew that the brand implementation services. had to be “right on point.” After all, if It is FDM’s philosophy that marketing is a discipline based on a you own a marketing company that toolbox. Sometimes as marketers we need the advertising “hammer,” the claims to be able to brand and market public relations “wrench” or the social media “screwdriver.” The tools work other’s, you better be able to brand fine alone, but together; they build a strong platform on which to build a and market yourself! solid brand. That leads to growth in sales and revenues – and that is what they want to achieve for our clients. The process began by stating the obvious... 1. The company would be challenged to use Holly’s last name - GRENVICZ - in the title. It is hard to spell, and pronounce! 2. The name needed to be memorable and different. 3. The brand needed to be reflective of the company’s core business - market- ing strategy.
  12. 12. A Fresh Dirt Marketing Case Study W W W. F R E S H D I R T M A R K E T I N G . C O M PROCESS & STRATEGY CREATIVE SOLUTION RESULTS The process began by brainstorming The ideas of digging, dirt and growth A striking first impression that is always words that Holly liked. This yielded a were the jumping off point for the FDM a conversation starter. document with more than 100 words brand. The colors green and brown and word combinations. Holly kept were chosen to communicate and sup- A unique and layered brand percep- coming back to the words that dealt port the name and tagline. A bright tion that illustrates a shining example with “digging” since this described the green was the focus to create a “fresh” of how FDM works with their own strategic development process quite and recognizable look to illustrate clients in developing brand strategy. literally. Her family tree ties back to a that FDM is truely a different and fresh farm in Northern Alabama that Holly’s alternative. A leaf was chosen as a family still runs and she visits often. symbol of growth. “Dirt” is no stranger, and became an obvious option for depicting organic The bright green has been carried into business growth. everything from collateral materials to the color of the office environment, Final inspiration came when the tag promo items and the office door. line jumped off the page - “We Dig In. You Grow.” said it all. By pairing The concept of growing and “digging the literal tag with the more creative - in” has been applied to everything even “fun” company name made it all FDM does including holding monthly gel and created a platform for great educational “DIGs”. design and creative execution.

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