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Stakeholder Meeting Csss092909

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  • 1. Waco 2050 Plan A Vision for the Heart of the City July 2009
  • 2. Walkable thoroughfares
  • 3. The best way to move 35 people? • …
  • 4. Auto Oriented Street Design
  • 5. Pedestrian Unfriendly
  • 6. Pedestrian Unfriendly
  • 7. People even “Pay Money to Walk”
  • 8. LA is always extreme
  • 9. Overview • New ways to look at street design • Focus of Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) • What makes streets walkable?
  • 10. Context Sensitive Solutions “One Size Does Not Fit All” Employment Town Regional Center District Residential Center Neighborhood Commercial Corridor Main Street Industrial St Residential Commercial Mixed Use Street Street Street
  • 11. Institutionalizing Nationally
  • 12. How does this apply ? • Regional Transportation Plans • Comprehensive Plans • Area and Master Plans • Performance Based MPO Selection Criteria • Thoroughfare Plan Updates
  • 13. Conventional Thinking Disregard context of street Applied blindly without designer discretion Discourage flexibility Fear of tort liability
  • 14. CSS vs.Conventional Thinking Conventional CSS Approach Context: Context: Urban Suburban Rural General urban Urban center Urban core Design criteria primarily based Design criteria primarily based on: on: Functional class Community objectives Design speed Functional class Forecast travel demand Thoroughfare type Level of service Adjacent land use
  • 15. Focus of CSS • Major urban thoroughfares in walkable areas – “Major”: • arterials and collectors – “Urban/Downtowns”: • Walkable suburbs, town and city centers, neighborhoods • mix of interactive land uses • Viable, attractive choices – Walking – Biking – Transit Photo: Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill LLP Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban
  • 16. Focus of CSS • Balance – Safety – Mobility – Community objectives – Environment • Multimodal • Involve public, stakeholders • Interdisciplinary teams • Flexibility in design • Incorporate aesthetics Source: Minnesota Department of Transportation
  • 17. CSS: In Pactice Simulation by Steve Price, Urban- Advantage
  • 18. CSS: In Pactice Simulation by Steve Price, Urban- Advantage E. 14th Street and Davis Street, San Leandro
  • 19. CSS: In Pactice Simulation by Steve Price, Urban- Advantage
  • 20. CSS Design Framework • Context zones: – Suburbs - downtowns • Street classification: – Functional class • Arterial • Collector – Thoroughfare type • Boulevard • Avenue • Street • Compatibility
  • 21. Context Zones Source: Duany Plater-Zyberk and Company
  • 22. Thoroughfare Types • Three classifications: – Boulevard – Avenue – Street • Basis for: – Physical configuration – Design criteria
  • 23. Boulevard • Divided arterial (4+ lanes) • Target speed (45 mph or less) • Through and local traffic • Serve longer trips • Access management • Major transit corridor • Primary freight route • Emergency response route • Limited curb parking
  • 24. Multi-way Boulevard • Characterized by: – Central roadway for through traffic – Parallel roadways access abutting property, parking, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities – Parallel roadways separated from the through lanes by curbed islands • Require significant right-of-way • Special treatment of intersections
  • 25. Avenue • Arterial or collector (4 lanes max) • Target speed (30 to 35 mph) • Land access • Primary ped and bike route • Local transit route • Freight - local deliveries • Optional raised landscaped median • Curb parking
  • 26. Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban
  • 27. Street • Collector or local • 2 lanes • Target speed (25mph) • Land access primary function • Designed to: – Connect residential neighborhoods – Connect neighborhoods with commercial districts – Connect local streets to arterials • May be commercial main street • Emphasizes curb parking • Freight restricted to local deliveries Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban
  • 28. Photographs from Michael King and Reid Ewing
  • 29. Roadside Design • Roadside zones: – Edge Zone – Furnishings Zone – Throughway Zone (ADA) – Frontage Zone • Function and dimensions vary by context zone and adjacent land use
  • 30. Roadside Design • Roadside zones • Public places • Placement of roadside facilities • Public art • Sidewalk width and function • Pedestrian buffers • Sidewalk/driveway/alley crossings • Street furniture • Utilities • Landscaping/street trees
  • 31. The Urban Roadside – Uses and Activities • Movement of pedestrians • Access to buildings/property • Utilities/appurtenances • Transit stops • Landscaping • Urban design/public art • Sidewalk cafes • Business functions • Civic spaces (plazas, seating)
  • 32. Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban
  • 33. Intersection Design • General principles • Intersection sight distance • Managing modal conflicts • General intersection layout • Curb return radii • Channelized right turns • Modern roundabouts • Crosswalks • Curb extensions • Bicycle lane treatment • Bus stops at intersections
  • 34. What Makes People Walk? • Practical Destinations
  • 35. What Makes People Walk? • Pleasant & Interesting Environment…a Human Scale
  • 36. What Makes People Walk? In most conventional suburban Walkable neighborhoods have streets development, streets separate uses, that connect uses, with arterials discouraging walking and forcing reserved for through traffic. even local trips onto arterial roads.
  • 37. Walkable Networks-Why Do Networks Work?
  • 38. Intersection Control 2 2 4 2 Same Total Lanes 6 6 2 More Capacity 4 • VMT 2 • Turns • Clearance Time • Signal Phase
  • 39. New Traffic Engineering MOEs Traditional Place-Based • Level of Service (auto) • Level of Service (multi- • Delay reduction (speed) modal) • Highest functional • Delay management (speed classification (capacity) appropriate) • Parking capacity (individual • Most context sensitive parcel) functional classification (multi-modal and internal capacity) • Parking capacity (park once district/multiple parcels)
  • 40. Networks Made of Walkable Streets Street Level Urban Redesign A redesign can do many things to improve the function, appearance and safety of a roadway. It can be accomplished by: Removing lanes from a multi-lane roadway 4 lane to 3 lane conversions Create parking and/or bike lanes out of existing lanes Widening sidewalks to encourage pedestrian activity

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