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I Know I’ve Seen Them Before: Using Persona Archetypes to Create Emotionally Engaging Spaces
 

I Know I’ve Seen Them Before: Using Persona Archetypes to Create Emotionally Engaging Spaces

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Our research found there are attendee and exhibitor archetypes whose view of the world is surprisingly predictable. By knowing what archetypes need, you can design engaging spaces that make powerful ...

Our research found there are attendee and exhibitor archetypes whose view of the world is surprisingly predictable. By knowing what archetypes need, you can design engaging spaces that make powerful emotional connections and delight audiences.

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  • Have you ever noticed there tend to be the same kinds of people at any event you go to? I don’t mean by title or age group. I’m talking about how people see the world? What kinds of similar people do you see?I do marketing research for the events industry, and I get to go to a wide range of conferences and tradeshows. Over time, I started noticing there are certain types of attendees and exhibitors who seem to have the same attitude and behaviors–no matter what that event was.So I decided to do some meta-analysis on my data and see if this is really true. And it actually is! What I will show you is based on 5,782 quantitative survey responses and 161 in-depth interviews. These items are from across 11 different association events, so they are skewed to associations. If you come from a background that’s different from associations, I’d challenge you to see how close this is to your experience.
  • So what’s an archetype? It’s a pattern of behaviors that helps you understand yourself and others. It can also be referred to as personas.Archetypes have been around a long time—actually, as long as people have been telling stories. In Greek mythology, the heroes Hercules and Odysseus are examples of onearchetype.Archetypes are not cut in stone, they’re generalities. Just like stereotypes, you can’t assume they apply uniformly to everyone. Sometimes a person can have the traits of one archetype or even several. But what’s true about archetypes is they cut across age, race, gender, and professional titles. So why should you care? When you know the archetypes that apply to your reality, the world is much easier to navigate. You have a framework or vocabulary to understand yourself and others better. That gives you information to design amazing experiences.
  • This is the classical archetype model. The theory originated with Carl Jung, the same person who created the basis for the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. He believed they represent parts of our experience that evoke deep emotions.[Jung believed that universal, mythic characters—archetypes—reside in our unconscious. They represent fundamental human parts of our experience as we evolved, so they evoke deep emotions.] Here are the 12 basic archetypes, and they can be grouped in different ways. In this format, there are 4 different kinds. It’s fun to see which archetype(s) you most identify with. You can even do this with family and/or friends.Around the beginning of the 21st century, [Leo Burnett] advertising agencies figured out they could help build brands and even create stories if they used this framework. So here’s what it looks like now. Each brand will represent the traits of that archetype.Remember which archetype you thought fit you best. Now see if how much you like the brand that’s associated with the archetype? Still fit?So let’s take the archetype story to events. What do Attendee Archetypes look like?[Source: “The Hero & The Outlaw”, Mark & Pearson]
  • There are three main groups I found among attendees:Desire to Leave a Mark. These are people who’re very excited and passionate at being at the event.Providing Structure. These people make the wheels of the world turn. They’re the reliable folks who do the job.Focus is Elsewhere. These people are at your event, but they aren’t focused in the way you’d like them to be.The next three slides will tell you a little more about these nine kinds of folks.
  • These are not real people, but it’s helpful to think about them that way. As we go through these, see if you recognize any of these attendees.Desire to Leave a Mark. The leaders of the world.Trend-Setting Leader. Often a CEO or an owner. He wants to network, especially with people at his level. He’s less concerned with education sessions.The Up and Comer.Tends to be a younger version of the Trend-Setting Leader.The Mentor.See these in the medical sectors. They’re defined by a strong sense of community.
  • Providing Structure. The people who hold the economy or ecosystem together.The Protégé. Teach me! They are a lot like the earlier group in that they want to learn, but they do NOT consider themselves industry leaders.Regular Guy. Wants to learn so he can immediately apply it at home. Love hands on.The Academic. See this in healthcare events. They’re older, more politically active within the association.
  • Focus is Elsewhere. They have a presence at the event, but you may not actively want to go after these people.Vacation Focused. They may or may not be energetic in the event’s activities, but they are jazzed about where it’s held. Vegas, Orlando, and Hawaii are awesome destinations.Reluctant. Forced to go. Boss may have told them, or they have to interact with a supplier.Phantom Exhibitor. AKA “suitcaser.” They may/may not be selling their products, but they are actively promoting their business. May also be scoping the event to see if they’ll exhibit in the future.That’s the three groups of attendees. The title of this session promises that we’ll do something with these archetypes. Remember at the beginning, I said to think of archetypes as shortcuts to designing experiences. I’m going to show you a few examples of how you can make physical spaces tap in to what these people care about, making strong emotional connections.
  • Networking Connections. The Trend-Setting Leader and Up and Comer are super attendees. They want to see and do it all, but they especially want to network. The Trend-Setting Leader wants to network with people at his level.Trend-Setting Leaders network with others at their level–SHRM Hideaway for profs at a certain level or above.
  • Networking Connections. The Trend-Setting Leader and Up and Comer are super attendees. They want to see and do it all, but they especially want to network. The Trend-Setting Leader wants to network with people at his level.Up-and-Comers want to learn how they can progress in their careers. GlobalShop provides a Retail Roundtable where attendees can talk with other attendees at only a director level or above. Speed-dating style, speakers rotate tables.
  • Protégés and Mentors Connecting. You can create environments that bring different archetypes together–like the Mentor and Protégé.ASM Mentoring Sessions in the Student Lounge.
  • Protégés and Mentors Connecting. You can create environments that bring different archetypes together – like the Mentor and Protégé.IFT SPA Lounge for post-docs/students planning to become professors to connect with actual professors. Professors ask the students about their posters.
  • Hands On Demos. The Regular Guy wants learning that will make him successful, then he wants to immediately put that to work. This guy thrives on hands-on product demos.ORSM Open Air Demo is the ultimate try-it-yourself.
  • Hands On Demos. The Regular Guy wants learning that will make him successful, then he wants to immediately put that to work. This guy thrives on hands-on product demos.ORSM Open Air Demo is the ultimate try-it-yourself.
  • Hands On Demos. At its 2013 annual meeting, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) featured a 9,000-square-foot, interactive mock emergency department featuring the latest innovations in emergency care. Thirty-seven companies showcased a variety of innovations (ultrasound, info systems, diagnostics, telemedicine, patient kiosks, etc.).Changes were focused on the here and now, not 10-15 years from now. They needed to know what was just around the corner. They needed an environment where they could see and use products that would soon be on the market, but not necessarily anything too visionary.
  • Hands-On Demos.At the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), InnovatED will feature a patient treatment and trauma room, a pre-hospital treatment area, patient check-ins and waiting areas, staffing stations, and a communication center. It required getting industry vendor sponsorship to make it happen.
  • Expo areas the emphasize learning: Desire to Leave a Mark and Providing Structure folks want to learn. Here are examples of exhibitors who built learning right into their booths.
  • For exhibitors, there are 2 major archetype clusters:Brand Builders. These are people who are more concerned with building their brand and establishing who they are to the world. They do want to get leads that turn into sales, but they most likely won’t pull out of the show if they have one lower-performing event.Sales Builders. These archetypes MUST make the sale. They are very focused on ROI and may come across as overly aggressive to attendees.
  • Brand Builders. Letting the world know who they are.The Anchor.This is who you think of when you think exhibit floor. Largest footprint on the floor. All about branding and relationship building. They’re association fans, but may consider a private event if they don’t see the value.Silent Leader.They like your event, getting good exposure and leads. Their booth is not as flashy as that of the Anchor, and they may not be as well known. They want to work with organizers to get more traffic.Defender.May have been a Silent Leader in the past. They have had good experiences at the event before, but not as much now. Cannot NOT be there. If I’m not there, customers will question if I’m still around and will go to my competition. International. – Often from Asia. Eager to be there, but may not know all the ins/outs of how to be a good exhibitor.
  • Sales Builders. Must make ROI or they’re out.Need for Scale – Often regional exhibitor, may have decided at the last minute to exhibit. If I don’t grow I may go out of business. Most aggressive group to attendees.Specialty Player – Selling to a sub group of the overall attendee base. Ex: orthodontia equipment at a dental conference, infertility testing at an OB/GYN event. Don’t go to a lot of events so they ones they do must count.Recruiter – Headhunters. See them at medical and maybe tech shows looking for hard-to-find talent.Coat-Tailers – Selling cars/vacations at medical shows. Often get high traffic, but their presence may be controversial. Ex: SHRM exhibitor selling jewelry, “HR pros need bling!”So what do these personas look like in action on the floor? Here are a few examples.
  • Anchor exhibits with strong branding. Anchor exhibitors want to get across what their brand stands for. They also want to build/nurture strong customer relationships.QualComm wanted attendees’ to know their products can be in all facets of people’s lives.
  • Anchor exhibits with strong branding. Anchor exhibitors want to get across what their brand stands for. They also want to build/nurture strong customer relationships.
  • (Recruiter) Smaller booths getting great traffic.Everyone wants good traffic, but the Sales Builders live and die by it. This is an exhibitor at IFT (food technology). They’re from a from a large packaged goods company, and they were specifically there to recruit food scientists. Sometimes engaging spaces don’t have to be fancy. These guys had a tiny 10x10 booth near a wall. And they were thrilled because traffic was great. They were near a critical entry where lots of people passed by.
  • Many of the Sales Builder personas have small booths. To get the most out of small spaces, be clever with color, images, and textures.
  • Silent Leaders want to build their brands and relationships, but they often have a smaller footprint than do Anchors. This space here does a good job of providing conversational space and conveying messages with clean colors and large, simple images.
  • International Exhibitors Clustered Together. Has anyone seen this before? Exhibitors from the same country (usually Asia) are clustered together. What’s your impression of that? Mine is that they’re usually not well trafficked, and the exhibitors look bored or lonely.This is an example of perhaps what not to do. What category did Internationals fall into? Brand Builders, so they want to make connections to get their name out. Is the cluster the right way to do this? What do you do when this is required by the host country?
  • Who are the archetypes that show up most often at your events?What could you do to create engaging spaces that would engage those archetypes?

I Know I’ve Seen Them Before: Using Persona Archetypes to Create Emotionally Engaging Spaces I Know I’ve Seen Them Before: Using Persona Archetypes to Create Emotionally Engaging Spaces Presentation Transcript

  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. I Know I’ve Seen Them Before Using Persona Archetypes to Create Emotionally Engaging Spaces Loretta Hudelot @FreemanXP
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. As presented at the IAEE Expo! Expo! Annual Meeting and Exhibition Dec. 10-12, 2013 Houston, Texas
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. When you know your archetypes, the world becomes easier to navigate Why Should I Care? A pattern of behaviors that helps you understand yourself and others What’s An Archetype?
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. LEAVING A MARK NO MAN AN ISLAND YEARNING FOR PARADISE PROVIDING STRUCTURE The Explorer The Innocent The Sage The Ruler The Creator The Care Giver The Jester The Lover The Regular Guy The Hero The Outlaw The Magician Classical Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Attendee Archetypes @FreemanXP
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. DESIRE TO LEAVE A MARK FOCUS IS ELSEWHERE PROVIDING STRUCTURE The Reluctant Attendee Vacation Focused The Phantom Exhibitor The Academic The Regular Guy The Protégé The Trend Setting Leader The Up & Comer The Mentor Attendee Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. No-nonsense leader interested in the latest trends • Wants to network, meet experts • Less interest in conference education • Established career Growth-oriented leader who gains inspiration from events • Hungry to learn, passionate • Early in career or business • Loves everything about events Empathetic leader who enjoys mentoring colleagues • Strong sense of community • Wants to network, share with others • Meeting experts, new vendors DESIRE TO LEAVE A MARK The Trend- Setting Leader The Up & Comer The Mentor Attendee Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Contributor looking to learn and advance, but not to lead • Wants education, to learn about trends • May appreciate a mentor • NOT an industry leader Hard worker who wants to improve job performance • Hands-on learner, likes product demos • Looking for solutions to current problems • May share tips with peers Academic representative, often politically involved • May fulfill governance requirements • Established in career • Wants to socialize with colleagues PROVIDING STRUCTURE The Academic The Regular Guy The Protégé Attendee Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Attendee interested in combining the event with a vacation • Wants an attractive, a desirable location • Coordinates with personal schedules • Less interested in trends Employee who attends often because he/she HAS to • Less interested in trends, networking, exhibitors • May enjoy entertainment, socializing Business owner who attends to sell his/her own services • Wants to network with attendees, see trends, gain competitive intelligence • Deciding about exhibiting in future The Reluctant Attendee Vacation Focused The Phantom Exhibitor FOCUS IS ELSEWHERE Attendee Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Trend-Setting Leaders Networking at Their Level The Trend- Setting Leader
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Up and Comers Connecting With Career Leaders The Up & Comer
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Mentors Advising Students in a Structured Setting The Mentor
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Protégés and Mentors Connecting in Their Specialty The Mentor The Protégé
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Ultimate Hands-On Demos for the Regular Guy The Regular Guy
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. See it, Touch it Demos for the Regular Guy The Regular Guy
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. See and Use Products Soon-to-Be on the Market The Protégé The Regular Guy The Trend- Setting Leader The Up & Comer The Mentor
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. See and Use Products Soon to Be on the Market The Protégé The Regular Guy The Trend- Setting Leader The Up & Comer The Mentor
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. In-Booth Theaters for Archetypes Who Want to Learn The Mentor The Mentor The Regular Guy The Protégé Vacation Focused The Trend Setting Leader The Up & Comer
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Exhibitor Archetypes @FreemanXP
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. BRAND BUILDERS SALES BUILDERS The Recruiter The Specialty Player The Coat-Tailer The Anchor The Silent Leader The Defender Exhibitor Archetypes Need for Scale The International
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Exhibitor Archetypes Large, familiar company with a large event footprint • Supports the event, may sit on the event’s board • Scrutinizing spend, may consider a private event The Anchor Well-respected company, not in the limelight • Events are a large percentage of the marketing spend • Wants to partner with the event organizer Mid-sized biz exhibiting to keep up with competitors • Feels obligated to attend • Concerned about being missed by customers • Less happy with event ROI Non-U.S. company growing into new U.S. markets • Wants to expand, look for new distribution channels • Often less familiar with event logistics, U.S. customs BRAND BUILDERS The Anchor The Silent Leader The Defender The International
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Small company looking to aggressively grow • Often a regional or first time exhibitor • Must generate sales to survive • Cost conscious Business targeting a subsection of attendees • Promoting specialty products to generalists • Exhibits at few events so they must count Company focused on finding hard-to- find talent • Looking to hire talent (doctors, dentists, technical) • Connect with early- career attendees Exhibitors selling products unrelated to the event • Often consumer products (jewelry, cars, vacations, etc) • Wants attendees with disposable incomes or in target SALES BUILDERS The Recruiter The Specialty Player The Coat-Tailer Need for Scale Exhibitor Archetypes
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. The Anchor Anchor Archetype Communicating Their Brand Message
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. The Anchor Anchor Archetype Communicating Their Brand Message
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. High-Traffic Location Is Engaging for Recruiters The Recruiter
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Color, Images, Textures Make the Most Out of Small Spaces The International The Specialty Player The Coat-Tailer The Recruiter Need for Scale
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Mid-Sized Spaces Can be Effective Brand Builders The Specialty Player The Defender The Silent Leader
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Is Clustering International Archetypes Engaging? The International
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. So… What is the Key Takeaway? @FreemanXP
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. …If you take the time to understand what creates engagement Physical spaces can be designed to complement archetypal mindsets
  • © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Don’t Be a Stranger Loretta Hudelot (214) 445-1292 loretta.hudelo@freemanxp.com FreemanXP.com @FreemanXP