Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Event Participants Are Narcissists
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Event Participants Are Narcissists

98
views

Published on

We all strive to have 100% engagement at our events, but have you ever been able to achieve that? This presentation discusses the macro trends that affect the events industry, how neuroscience relates …

We all strive to have 100% engagement at our events, but have you ever been able to achieve that? This presentation discusses the macro trends that affect the events industry, how neuroscience relates to your audience's needs, and how neuroscience can create engaging experiences.

Published in: Marketing, Technology, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
98
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • What does engagement mean? Engaged is a buzzword that means “this is something I really care about.” Or “oooh that’s really cool, I want to know/experience more about that.”

    What if … all the people who come to your event were 100% engaged? What would your event look like?

    You can get to engaged by understanding macro trends. This presentation is in 3 parts …

    What ARE the macro trends (MTs)?
    How neuroscience relates to my audience’s needs.
    How neuroscience can create engaging experiences based on MTs.
  • What types of roles are represented in the room? (Meetings manager, exhibitor sales, marketing, etc.)

    Why should you care about MTs? “Macro trends” can also be a buzzword. It really means what attendees consistently say they want or what our competitors are doing.

    MTs show you where you have an advantage over your competitors or it can show you opportunities on where to grow. It’s a starting point of knowledge.
  • It’s interesting to think of your organization as I go through this. Are you doing this? How likely would it be for you to implement it?

    Looking through a variety of sources (industry, marketing/advertising, financial), four MTs emerged.

    Engagement–We’re in the Age of the Customer. This is why I said “Event Participants are Narcissists.” It’s all about getting what I want, the way I want. (What’s your Starbucks drink?)


    Sources: CEIR, Trade Show Executive, Exhibit City News, ExpoWeb, Successful Meetings, B2B Magazine, American Marketing Assoc, Springwise, AdAge, Yahoo Finance
  • Neuroscience is also a hot trend. Hot in bsn, marketing and events space.
  • Neuroscience can be scary to some (think of caps with wires, fMRI machines, brain manipulation). It’s true that MDs and PhDs do use these techniques (not brain manipulation) to study brain anatomy and how it relates to behavior. But that’s not what we’re going to talk about here.

    For us in the business world, it’s about taking the nuggets of what those MDs/PhDs have learned about behavior and applying them to our industry.

    The scientists have discovered people will act a certain way because the brain is hardwired that way (through evolution). This is the same regardless of gender, ethnicity, age, nationality, or occupation.

    Neuroscience is really learning about what makes people tick, and why they do what they do. When you know why people do what they do, you can impact their concerns and be the hero.
  • One of the most important things neuroscience has discovered is that our decisions are a combination of rational and emotional factors.
  • When you ask people why they come to events, here’s what you hear.

    Does this sound familiar? What type of show do you have? This is consistent across any event industry. These reasons don’t really change.

    What’s important to note is that these needs are rational, stated–not emotional.

    Source: CEIR Exhibition Spend Study 2011 and research surveys we’ve conducted with Freeman customers
  • What do successful events do? They meet those rational/stated needs (in the center, from the last slide) AND also meet emotional needs.

    Events that perform well have positive emotions attached to them (like inspired, valued).

    For events that don’t perform well, you’ll hear/see emotions like angry, irritated, hurried, etc.
  • This is an example to show you can focus too much on the rational.

    Eurostar, the railway from Paris to London, spent $9.5M to reduce travel time ~40 minutes.

    1% could have been spent to put wifi on the trains–wouldn’t reduce time but would make the time more pleasant.

    10% could have been spent to have world’s top supermodels walk up/down passing out cocktails, and people would have wanted the ride to be longer.

    For us in the events industry, the perception of the event is what matters. People need to believe it’s a good show, not that it absolutely has to be a good show.

    Source: Rory Sutherland (Ogilvy and Mather)
  • This is the only techy slide.

    Imagine a brain. What does it look like? Lobes/ropey part is the neocortex, or the new brain. Reasoning takes place here. But the brain didn’t always look like this--over time, it evolved to be this way.

    Think back to caveman times. Then our brain was just focused on instincts (running away, finding food, mating). This brain still exists in us today and is closest to the brain stem. It’s called the Reptile brain, or the deep brain.

    Over time, the middle brain formed and emotions evolved. This is also called the Limbic System. Finally the neocortex, or new brain, formed in modern man.

    So what does that mean? When you want to get someone’s attention you need to reach the oldest part of the brain first–the deep, reptile brain. Then you can get them engaged/excited by hitting the emotional angle. Finally finish off the experience with the rational argument.

    Definitions: Middle Brain – Limbic System; New Brain – Neocortex

  • Here’s a real world example to explain how there’s more to us than just the rational, thinking side. Who here has a personal Facebook account?

    Research by Dr. A.K Pradeep of NeuroFocus:

    Post–hear me, appreciate me (bragging), support me (laid off, death), remember me (memorial profiles)

    [Login – What’s going on? (not get left out), Who wants to know me? (new friend invitations), What reaction did I create or stimulate? (see the responses)]

    Facebook facts: As of November 2012, there are 1B monthly active users. 81% are outside of the United States and Canada.

    For us in Events, if you know what your customers care about deeply AND you can give that to them, they’ll find a way to stick with you even when times are tough (e.g., give up basic cable).
  • Here’s another example of what we’ve learned from neuroscience. We don’t always know what influences us, we just subconsciously perceive it.

    This is a story about swag. Love it or leave it, trinkets and trash.

    Swag--52% of tradeshow attendees say they’re more likely to enter a booth that provides some sort of giveaway (American Marketing Association 12/11)

    For events, value can come from the little things. You don’t always have to spend a fortune.

    Source: Bob Milam, Tradeshow Bob
  • One more neuroscience learning: We don’t consider everything from an experience, just the most noticeable parts.

    This is a clip of exiting a keynote at a large healthcare event (37,000 attendees, 1100 exhibitors). What do you think these people remember?

    What if there was music, something to create positive energy?

    How many of you have motivational speakers at your events? People are leaving energized and inspired. What can you do to keep up that positive energy and extend it past just the speaker? In this example, they could have had upbeat music playing.
  • Neuroscience is interesting, but what do I do with it?

    If you marry the knowledge of macro trends with the insights of neuroscience, you can get to engaging experiences.
  • Let’s go back to the industry trends. The big one is the environment is ripe for technology that has value.

    Value: Warren Buffett’s definition of value. “Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.”

    The neuroscience application is to introduce emotion into the equation. Use technology to engage people (hook them in) and create a positive emotion.
  • Here’s how it works. We don’t pay attention to boring things. Technology can make things nonboring.

    It does that by making a WOW experience that triggers emotions. Emotions pull you in and keep you engaged.

    The WOW connects to the brand--it imbeds itself in your memory. Then you remember that brand when it’s time to decide.

    So emotional Wows influence behavior. (Politicians speak to emotions.)
  • These last slides share cool technology that’s (for the most part) new to our industry. Think of them as “what if we did this” examples.

    Poken/Minglestick
    Has anyone used this at their event? I experienced Minglestick at TMRE. Very helpful to have an Excel spreadsheet after the event so I could track down a speaker several weeks later.
  • For the Bio 2012 event, Freeman created a game for the BIO Agriculture group (a group within bio.org). The bsn goal was to attract new members, especially younger audiences not yet affiliated with the association.

    Show the F2F Race game.

  • Second Screen
    What if you used Second Screen during sessions? Giving people permission to be on their smart phones/tablets?

    Madden 2012 for Xbox/Playstation has an added feature - a database of players/stats you can recruit to the team at any time, and you can hold discussions.

    Source: Conference Pad (App store)


    Pick ‘n Play
    This is an example of how to use gaming for a large audience. In this case, it’s in Sweden at a populated outdoor square. People use their smart phone to play Pong on an outdoor billboard that’s sponsored by McDonald’s. If they win, they get a coupon for free food.

    What’s cool is to see how excited people get.

    How could you use this technology to motivate crowds? To excite, to energize?

    Video: Start at :13, Stop at :59
  • These 2 aren’t as brand new–using NFC for commerce exchange.

    POS
    This is not new–think taxicabs.

    For buying tradeshows, what if every exhibitor on the floor had one of these applications?


    Starbucks
    What if, similar to the Starbucks app, you could preload an account and let people buy/get points using their smart phone?

    The reward might be something that’s valuable to that experience. If it’s a conference, perhaps an extra session; if it’s a buying show, then maybe a discount; or let them pick if it’s both!
  • Radio Frequency Identification–What if you used RFID to do more than just track people’s movement in booths?

    RFID to create a hosted buyer experience
    For an Adweek event, FISH technology (consulting company) used RFID bracelets to create a hosted buyer experience for Microsoft.

    To promote Microsoft Advertising (its digital marketing services), Microsoft gave 1,000 red RFID bracelets to registered visitors. The bracelets provided real-time info for personalized interaction with each wearer. Benefits: pull them to the front of a line, give them VIP seats at conference events, provide free rides in Microsoft’s pedi-cabs, and allow entry to The LOFT party.

    The RFID registration draws in new potential partners, and the event created an experience where attendees feel part of the Microsoft Advertising community.

    Source: FISH Technology, consulting company

    Coldplay
    Did anyone go to the Coldplay concert this year? They figured out to really elevate the fun factor by using RFID.
  • You can’t just throw technology at people and expect them to be engaged (an app is not for everyone).

    Engaging means different things to different people. Must know who are core groups at your event, what they care about/need. Then provide technology that meets their specific needs.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Event Participants Are Narcissists And Other Surprising Events Industry Macro Trends
    • 2. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Presented by: Loretta Hudelot At Expo!Expo! 2012 (214) 445-1292 loretta.hudelot@freemanco.com
    • 3. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. What macro trends are impacting the events industry? Learning Objective 1
    • 4. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. The Macro Trend Story for Face-to- Face The Macro Trend Story for Face-to- Face 3 • Events are improving, exhibitors returning • But not at ‘08 levels 3- A stabilizing economy3--A stabilizing economy 2 • Mobile in early majority • Social media for meetings • Video invitations 2- Technology isn’t so scary 2--Technology isn’t so scary 4 Demand for Industry Tech With VALUE • Virtual and hybrid • Digital way- finding • Gamification, RFID 4- Tech with value 4--Tech with value 1 • Interactive format • Hosted buyer events • Custom event apps 1- Engage me! (Customization) 1- Engage me! (Customization) 1--Engage me! (Customization)
    • 5. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. How does neuroscience relate to my audience’s needs? Learning Objective 2 Twitter: @FreemanCo
    • 6. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Neuroscience Is About What Makes People Tick You’re a HERO! Knowledge to impact concerns Why people do what they do
    • 7. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Decisions Are Rational AND Emotional Neuroscience Decision Model Decisions Are Rational AND Emotional Rational Emotional
    • 8. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. • Network with colleagues/vendors • Keep up on trends • Education • See/evaluate new products • Find a new vendor • Location Attendee Why People Come to Events These reasons do not change Exhibitor • Identify new leads • Build brand awareness • Meet with customers • Have a presence • Launch new product/service • Competitive intelligence
    • 9. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Successful Events Meet Rational and Emotional Needs Events Performing Well Rational Networkin g Education Trends Leads Awareness Relationships Emotion alHow do you feel? Angry Stresse d Irritated Neglected Events NOT Performing Well Rational Networkin g Education Trends Leads Awareness Relationships Emotion alHow do you feel? Inspired Hopeful Valued Energize d Happy Hurried
    • 10. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. People need to BELIEVE it’s a good show Perception RULES!
    • 11. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. How Does Your Brain Decide? The 3 brains New Brain—Rational Middle Brain—Emotional Reptile Brain—Instincts
    • 12. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. How does your brain decide? The 3 brains Reptile Brain - Instincts Middle Brain - Emotional New Brain - Rational It’s About What We Want at a Deep Level Understand what customers deeply care about. Give them that, and they’ll find a way to stick with you. Why do people POST on Facebook?
    • 13. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Sometimes we don’t know what influences us, we just subconsciously perceive it Sometimes we don’t know what influences us, we just subconsciously perceive it Value can come from the little things Value can come from the little things
    • 14. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. We don’t consider all the elements of an experience, only the most noticeable Make your most noticeable moments count
    • 15. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. How can neuroscience create engaging experiences? Learning Objective 3
    • 16. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. The Macro Trend Story for Face-to- Face The Macro Trend Story for Face-to- Face 3 • Events are improving, exhibitors returning • But not at ‘08 levels 3- A stabilizing economy3--A stabilizing economy 2 • Mobile in early majority • Social media for meetings • Video invitations 2--Technology isn’t so scary 2--Technology isn’t so scary 4 Demand for Industry Tech With VALUE 4- Tech with value 4--Tech with value 1 • Interactive format • Hosted buyer events • Custom event apps 1- Engage me! (Customization) 1- Engage me! (Customization) 1--Engage me! (Customization) • Virtual and hybrid • Digital way- finding • Gamification, RFID
    • 17. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Technolog y creates emotional WOWs We Don’t Pay Attention to Boring Things I see the experience I’m WOW’ed by the experience I link that WOW feeling to your brand That WOW feeling embeds itself in my memory I remember your brand when it’s time to decide Event Tech Impacts Behavior
    • 18. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Poken/Minglestick Collect and exchange digital info offline via NFC Flock (by Bump) Share multiple-user photos into a single album Technology to Interact With OthersTechnology to Interact With Others
    • 19. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Technology to Play WithTechnology to Play With Throwable microphone to liven event participation Catchbox Social gaming at the BIO Agriculture booth Gamification
    • 20. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. Technology to Enhance ExperiencesTechnology to Enhance Experiences Companion device supplementing primary info delivered by another medium Second Screen McDonald’s Pick ‘n Play Experiential advertising in a group settinghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7u0ij9D5S4Y
    • 21. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. NFC as a Mobile WalletNFC as a Mobile Wallet Point-of-Sale Applications Credit card payment via mobile device Starbucks App Electronic account linked to a mobile phone, money deposited and used as cash, rewards earned
    • 22. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. RFID to Engage Microsoft Advertising Hosted buyer event using RFID bracelets to provide personalized experiences to key audiences Coldplay Concert 30,000+ RFID wrist bracelets flashed colored lights in sync with the music
    • 23. © Copyright 2014 Freeman Expositions, Inc. Proprietary & Confidential. But a Solid Strategy Is Still Needed But a Solid Strategy Is Still Needed