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  • Tea is typically considered to be black, green, white, and oolong teas which are all, “made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant” (Lowenstein, 2011). The difference between these teas is the way they are prepared. “Black tea is made from leaves that have been wilted (dried out) and then fully oxidized (meaning that chemicals in the leaves are modified through exposure to air). Green tea's leaves are wilted but not oxidized. Oolong tea is wilted and then only partially oxidized, and white tea is not wilted or oxidized at all” (Lowenstein, 2011). Chamomile, ginger, peppermint, and other brews are not teas, but rather plants that have been infused and made into a tea like substance.
  • “Black tea: Made with fermented tea leaves, black tea has the highest caffeine content and forms the basis for flavored teas like chai, along with some instant teas. Studies have shown that black tea may protect lungs from damage caused by exposure to cigarette smoke. It also may reduce the risk of stroke” (Edgar).
  • “Green tea: Made with steamed tea leaves, it has a high concentration of EGCG and has been widely studied. Green tea’s antioxidants may interfere with the growth of bladder, breast, lung, stomach, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers; prevent clogging of the arteries, burn fat, counteract oxidative stress on the brain, reduce risk of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, reduce risk of stroke, and improve cholesterol levels” (Edgar).
  • White tea is unfermented and uncured. It undergoes much less processing than other types of tea and is thought to have more potent anticancer properties than some of the other types of tea that are processed more.
  • “Oolong tea falls somewhere between green and black teas, as its leaves are only partially oxidized” (Health Benefits of Oolong Tea).
  • It’s important to remember that many teas contain caffeine and that people react differently to caffeine than other. With everything we consume, it’s good to keep in mind that everything should be done and consumed in moderation. Excessive amounts of caffeine can cause anxiety, headaches, irregular hearbeat, heartburn, confusion, and/or diarrhea. When so much caffeine is consumed that these negative side effects become present, it kind of defeats the good purposes of consuming the teas.
  • Herbal brews are made with a variety of other plants that have been infused. Many times these concoctions will include various plants, flowers, and supplements that have health or nutritious benefits. There are many types of herbal brews and the effects they cause vary greatly and can help a wide variety of issues. They have teas to help you fall asleep, promote healthy lactation for breast feeding mothers, promote regularity in bowel movements, help sore throats, help upset stomachs, and relieve stress. There are many other types of herbal “teas” as well and while you have to pay attention to the labels and packaging, many times herbal brews are caffeine free.
  • When purchasing tea, you might want to keep Fair Trade in mind. Most teas and herbal brews that abide by Fair Trade Policies will clearly mark their products with a Fair Trade Stamp. “Fair Trade helps tea farmers and workers gain access to capital, set fair prices for their products, and make democratic decisions about how to best improve their business, their community and their tea” (Products).Fair Trade is a non-profit organization and their mission statement reads, “We provide farmers in developing nations the tools to thrive as international business people. Instead of creating dependency on aid, we use a market-based approach that gives farmers fair prices, workers safe conditions, and entire communities resources for fair, healthy and sustainable lives. We seek to inspire the rise of the Conscious Consumer and eliminate exploitation” (About Fair Trade USA).
  • BibliographyAbout Fair Trade USA. (n.d.). Retrieved October 14, 2013, from Fair Trade USA: http://www.fairtradeusa.org/about-fair-trade-usaEdgar, J. (n.d.). Types of Teas and Their Health Benefits. Retrieved October 14, 2013, from WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/tea-types-and-their-health- benefitsHealth Benefits of Oolong Tea. (n.d.). Retrieved October 15, 2013, from Organic Facts: http://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/beverage/health-benefits-of-oolong- tea.htmlLowenstein, K. (2011, October 6). The Truth About the Health Benefits of Tea. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from Health: http://www.health.com/health/article/0,,20534999,00.htmlProducts. (n.d.). Retrieved October 14, 2013, from Fair Trade USA: http://www.fairtradeusa.org/products-partners/tea 

Transcript

  • 1. Health Benefits of Teas and Herbal Brews By: H. McClure Kaplan University
  • 2. Types of Teas • • • • • Black Green White Oolong Herbal
  • 3. Black Tea • Characteristics: • Made from fermented tea leaves • Highest caffeine content • Benefits: • May protect lungs from smoke damage • May reduce the risk of stroke.
  • 4. Green Tea • Characteristics: • Made with steamed tea leaves • Contains high levels of antioxidants (EGCG’s) • Benefits: • May interfere with the growth of bladder, breast, lunch, stomach, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. • May prevent clogging of arteries, reduce risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, reduce the risk of stroke.
  • 5. White Tea • Characteristics: • Unfermented • Uncured • Benefits: • Thought to have more potent anti-cancer properties than other types of tea since it is not highly processed.
  • 6. Oolong Tea • Characteristics: • Falls between green and black teas • Leaves are only partly oxidized • Benefits: • May improve weight management, healthy skin, healthy bones, stress management, and many other benefits.
  • 7. Precautions • Teas contain caffeine. • Consume caffeine in moderation or speak with your health care provider before consuming if you have a caffeine sensitivity. • Side effects of caffeine can include: anxiety, headaches, irregular heartbeat, and other unpleasant effects.
  • 8. Herbal Brews • Characteristics: • Contain less caffeine • Made from other plants • Benefits: • There are many types of herbal brews designed to help a wide variety of issues in a natural way.
  • 9. Fair Trade • “We provide farmers in developing nations the tools to thrive as international business people. Instead of creating dependency on aid, we use a market-based approach that gives farmers fair prices, workers safe conditions, and entire communities resources for fair, healthy and sustainable lives. We seek to inspire the rise of the Conscious Consumer and eliminate exploitation.
  • 10. Wrapping Up.. • There are many possible health benefits from drinking tea and herbal brews. • Consider for finding a tea or herbal brew to help with your next headache, stomach ache, or other issue before resorting to medications. • Help the little guys (and yourself) rather than large corporations and do it in a healthier way.
  • 11. Bibliography About Fair Trade USA. (n.d.). Retrieved October 14, 2013, from Fair Trade USA: http://www.fairtradeusa.org/about-fair-trade-usa Edgar, J. (n.d.). Types of Teas and Their Health Benefits. Retrieved October 14, 2013, from WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/tea-types-and-theirhealth- benefits Health Benefits of Oolong Tea. (n.d.). Retrieved October 15, 2013, from Organic Facts: http://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/beverage/health-benefits-ofoolong- tea.html Lowenstein, K. (2011, October 6). The Truth About the Health Benefits of Tea. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from Health: http://www.health.com/health/article/0,,20534999,00.html Products. (n.d.). Retrieved October 14, 2013, from Fair Trade USA: http://www.fairtradeusa.org/products-partners/tea