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    Genealogy 102 presentation Genealogy 102 presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Genealog y 102
    • What is a Source? One definition of a source - by James Tanner: “A source is a person, book, document or other information provider that is used to establish a name, date, place or event in an ancestor's life.” Another definition – by Bill Buchanan: “A source should identify the individual, the type of source record, where the record is found, and the key contents of the record. It should allow other researchers to find the same source.”
    • What is a Source? Sample Sources - FamilySearch United States Census, 1910, index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M5WM-QX3 : accessed 17 Oct 2013), Benjamin C Haviland in household of Virgil C Haviland, Catskill, Greene, New York, United States; citing sheet , family 246, NARA microfilm publication T624, FHL microfilm 1374963
    • What is a Source? Sample Sources – City Clerk's office Marriage Record No. 3465 Office of the City Clerk Municipal Building Manhattan The City of New York Date of marriage: October 19, 1942 11:13 AM 1942
    • What is a Source? Sample Sources – City Clerk's office LDS Film #1953615; State of New York certificate and record of birth (Borough of Manhattan) 1898-1909 Microfilm of original records at the New York City Municipal Archives in New York City. publication: Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1994 Certificate #34156, 1899
    • Determining the accuracy of the information I find. Evaluate the records What are the most accurate records? What are less accurate records? What are the least accurate records?
    • Evaluate the Record
    • Most Accurate Records
    • Less Accurate Records
    • Least Accurate Records
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death – (Death records are not the best source for birth and names of parents but better than nothing) deaths roll #287 (0961511) vol 438 p 696 date of death: Nov 28, 1893 place of death, residence: Royalston Maria Eaton, female, widow age: 75y, 8m cause of death: accidental from falling down stairs occupation: housekeeper birthplace: Bennington parents: David & Sally Wright birthplace: unknown Citation: Massachusetts Death Records, 18411915", index and images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org); from Massachusetts State Archives. "Deaths, 1841-1971". Massachusetts Division of Vital Statistics, State House, Boston, Massachusetts. FHL microfilm. Family History
    • Public Record Sources Cemetery records Discrepancies Between Tombstone & Cemetery Record Wm H. Hocumb – Wm Holcumb Maria R. Eaton – Myra Eaton d. Nov 28 - d. Nov 24
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death – (Death records are not the best for birth and names of parents but better than nothing) • Church records • Cemetery records Discrepancies between Tombstone & Cemetery Record Age 72 – Age 66
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death • Cemetery records • Church records
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death • Cemetery records • Church records • Census
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death – (Death records are not the best for birth and names of parents but better than nothing) • Cemetery records • Church records • Census • Immigration
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death • Cemetery records • Church records • Census • Immigration • Probate Records
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death – (Death records are not the best for birth and names of parents but better than nothing) • Cemetery records • Church records • Census • Immigration • Probate Records • Land Records - see case study at genealogyblog.com/?p=23386
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death • Cemetery records • Church records • Census • Immigration • Probate Records • Land Records • City Directories 1939
    • Public Record Sources • Birth, marriage & death records contain primary information for birth, marriage, death ● (Death records are not the best for birth and names of parents but better than nothing) • Cemetery records • Church records • Census • Immigration • Probate Records • Land Records • City Directories • Newspapers - obituaries, marriage announcements or accounts are great for adding to your knowledge of your family.
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – Historical Records – Many online – FamilySearch Catalog – Use Catalog to order microfilm – FamilySearch Wiki – Use the FamilySearch Wiki to find out what records are available in different places and how to access them – Write letters or email to clerk's offices, archives, historical societies, ... Ancestry.com – Historical Records – Many online – Ancestry Wiki – Redbook, The Source, information about many other sources & tips for doing research Redbook and The Source are also available at the Family History Center
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – Historical Records – Many online
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – Historical Records – Many online
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – FamilySearch Catalog – Use Catalog to order microfilm Redbook and The Source are also available at the Family History Center
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – FamilySearch Catalog – Use Catalog to order microfilm
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – FamilySearch Wiki – Use the FamilySearch Wiki to find out what records are available in different places and how to access them Redbook and The Source are also available at the Family History Center
    • Public Record Sources FamilySearch.org – FamilySearch Wiki – Use the FamilySearch Wiki to find out what records are available in different places and how to access them
    • Public Record Sources More free Websites to check out • Ancestry.com - historical records, free in the *Family History Center Premium Websites & CRRL • billiongraves.com - photograph or transcribe tombstones, search for ancestors • cyndislist.com - more than 262,790 links to other internet resources • davidrumsey.com - David Rumsey Historical Map Collection • FamilySearch.org - free historical records & Family Tree • findagrave.com - look for ancestors’ graves, request photos or submit information • Heritage Quest - free census records, Freedman’s Bank, etc through librarypoint.org from CRRL with library card number OR free in *Family History Center Premium Websites • usgenweb.org - genealogical websites for every state and county in the US - some better than others • worldgenweb.org - genealogical websites for other countries • www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm - Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com 1. Source the record ... you need to know where the record comes from and who supplied the information. How can you evaluate the validity of the evidence if you don’t know where the information and who supplied it? If the info comes from your crazy great aunt it may not be valid. Or it may be. But you have an idea of whether you should trust it or not.
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com 2. Examine the image, not just the index. Never, ever, ever attach a record without looking at the image if the image is available. Not everything on the image is included in the search index. (The search index is there to help you find the image.) You might miss something. Just the other day I was looking at my great uncle’s 1940 census record and noticed he had a supplemental line at the bottom. Low and below it told me that my great uncles father (my great grandfather) served in the Spanish American War and World War I. If I had just attached the record without thoroughly examining the image, I might have missed an important clue.
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com 3. List all points of genealogical importance. It is amazing how writing something down helps you understand it. It is too easy to glance at something and not really grasp it. But if you write every little bit of genealogical data in a record, you might find something you missed. When was the record recorded? Name each person listed on the record no matter how significant. Every date, location and relationship you find. Any assumptions you might have. (Oh, and write down that something is assumption.) If everything is written down, it is easy to review later.
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com 4. What questions do you have? … now that you’ve looked at the image and gathered everything you can find, what new questions do you have? Do you know who all the people are on the document? Do you know why that document was created? Then you can create a plan on how to answer them.
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com 5. File it so you can find it again later. … Put the information you wrote down somewhere you could find it. You can put it in a Word file, or a Story on Ancestry online trees. And if you have Family Tree Maker, then you can put it in the notes files. And there it is whenever you need it.
    • Public Record Sources Five Things You Should Do With Every Record Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2013 in Ancestry.com Try this on your latest brick wall. Gather all the records you have for a person and go through them and do all five steps for each record. You may have the answer right in front of you. Or you may have asked the right question that will lead you to the answer. http://goo.gl/jF66Cp