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More Scoops of Chapman's Ice Cream. .

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More at http://www.nosweatpublicspeaking.com

More at http://www.nosweatpublicspeaking.com

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  • 1. More Scoops of Chapman’s Ice Cream that. . .Make ”Subtle Little Differences!”As stated in a previous article, Chapman’s Ice Cream, a past St. Louis tradition, wasfamous for their advertising campaign that stated there was a “subtle little difference” intheir product that “made all the difference!” Apply that philosophy to your presentations.Here are more “subtle little differences” you can use that will “make allthe difference” in how the audience perceives you, your message and how wellthey GET IT! ■ Make a “subtle little difference” with the Title of your speech. ■ Think of the Title of your speech as if it were the headline of a newspaper article, subject line of an email, or the title on the spine of a book sitting on a shelf at the bookstore. ■ If it doesn’t quickly grab someones attention, they won’t look any further, and hence, won’t attend your talk! ■ If I had chosen to name my signature speech, blog and book, “How to Give a Good Speech and Presentation” would you be reading this now? “No Sweat Public Speaking!” attaches emotionally! ■ Make a “subtle little difference” by Insisting on Name Tags ■ If the meeting planner doesn’t provide them, have your own and bold Sharpie pens available. ■ Name Tags reach out, and pull you in. They close the gap between you and individuals in the audience. The Meet & Greet you should be doing before each speaking event is made easier by approaching people wearing Name Tags and addressing them personally. ■ Audience members will appreciate the Name Tags, also! ■ When taking Questions ■ Make a ”subtle little difference” by repeating the question if in a large room and the person asking does not have a microphone. (This is so often overlooked!) ■ Look directly at the person who asked the question when you start your answer, but then move on to have eye contact with others. ■ If you only look at the questioner during your answer, others will feel left out.
  • 2. ■ You also run the risk of getting into a dialogue with them, possibly getting off track, and not addressing other members questions. ■ Don’t miss the opportunity to make a “subtle little difference” by Branding Yourself! ■ My good friend, Russ Henneberry, has a business; Tiny Business, Mighty Profits. He closes each presentation with, “Do the things we discussed today, and YourTiny Business will have – Mighty Profits!” ■ When I speak, I close with, “a Challenge and a Prediction,” stating “by using the components, parts and elements of “No Sweat Public Speaking” your next speech will be absolutely, positively - No Sweat!” ■ Make a “subtle little difference” by using Self-Effacing Humor. ■ Making fun of yourself is far better than making fun of others. The ability to make fun of yourself shows self -confidence. ■ Although there’s probably a wealth of material, don’t overdo it because it will have a negative effect on the audience. ■ Connect with Your Audience Emotionally, and you’ll make a “not so subtle difference.” ■ Using my friend Russ as an example, again, he once started a presentation by telling the audience, amongst other thing, “I’m a Failure!” He went on to explain how a previous business went bust and the effects it had on him financially and emotionally. ■ When he uttered that phrase, “I’m a Failure.” it had the same impact on the attendees as when Renee Zelwicker exclaimed in the movie, Jerry McQuire, “You had me at “Hello’” Everyone in Russ’s audience instantly connected to him on an emotional level. ■ I can not over emphasize the impact of that statement. Too many times we hear speakers talk about how great they are and their many accomplishments. They hardly ever mention failure, and consequently, often don’t connect emotionally with their audiences.I’ll close this Post with a Challenge and a Prediction.The Challenge is: the next time you prepare and deliver a presentation, use some of the“subtle little differences” in this and the previous article. Do that, and my Prediction isyour speech will be absolutely, positively – No Sweat!About the AuthorFred E. Miller is a speaker, an author and a coach.Businesses and individuals hire him because they want to improve their PublicSpeaking and Presentation Skills.They do this because we perceive really great speakers to be Experts.
  • 3. Perception is reality and we rather deal with Experts.He shows them how to Develop, Practice and Deliver Knock Your Socks OffPresentations! with - No Sweat!Fred E. MillerFred@NoSweatPublicSpeaking.comnosweatpublicspeaking.com