Culture CUA1, Theories of Second Lanugage Grammar and Acquisition, Western Governoor's University Task #1
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This is an example of my Task #1 from Western Governor's University Task #1. Remember this is the property of the university and my intent is to assist others in their quest.

This is an example of my Task #1 from Western Governor's University Task #1. Remember this is the property of the university and my intent is to assist others in their quest.

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Culture CUA1, Theories of Second Lanugage Grammar and Acquisition, Western Governoor's University Task #1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. SLO1 -Theories of Second Language Acquisition and Grammar This Webinar will direct you to places where you can get information, help, and answers. It will give some of the main ideas to know under each topic, and distinguish some easily confused terms. Please raise your hand, or ask, if you want further clarification or have questions.
  • 2. Inside the COS in “Your Learning Resources”. Topic menu is on the left. Learning Resources are the place to start!
  • 3. Morphology the study of forming words from morphemes. imperfection im perfect tion
  • 4. Morphology – the study of forming words from morphemes. An Introduction to Language, ch. 3, How Language Works, “Morphemes”. Morpheme=the smallest unit of linguistic meaning or function. Allomorph= alternative morpheme (the changing end sound in hats/frogs/kisses). Free morpheme=single morpheme that can be a word all by itself (hit/wish/bat) Bound morpheme= can only occur attached to other morphemes in words (hidden/watched). Inflectional morpheme=has a strict grammatical function. Derivational morpheme= may be needed to create an adjective or other part of speech (petrify/quickly)
  • 5. Syntax sentence structure, and the study of it. Sentence Noun phrase noun adjective Verb phrase verb
  • 6. Syntax – sentence structure, and the study of it. An Introduction to Language, ch’s 1, 2, & 4. Teaching ESL/EFL Listening and Speaking: ch’s 2 & 3. Online Guide to Grammar and Writing. Think: word order How do we order words to make a question? (use “question words” at the beginning, add “do” to a sentence (Do you want a cookie?), move a be verb to the front (Are you going?) Forming complex verbs: Present progressive: be verb+(verb) “ing”(You are shoveling snow). “Ing” does not automatically = present progressive tense, it could be a Gerund! (What an amazing concept!) Don’t ignore the articles/adjectives (a/an/some, the, one/two…) Sapir-Wharf Hypothesis: in ch. 1, the belief that our language either determines or effects our thinking and perception of the world. ◦ Linguistic Relativism----Linguistic Determinism
  • 7. Semantics the study of the ways that language structures meaning in words and sentences. Who/what is doing the action? • noun • Person/place/thing What do we need to know about him/her/them/it? • adjectives • Describing words/phrases What is the action? • verb • Active/passive • What needs to be said about the action?
  • 8. Semantics – the study of the ways that language structures meaning in words and sentences. An Introduction to Language, ch. 5, Teaching ESL/EFL Listening and Speaking: ch’s 5 & 8. Additional web pages in COS. Discourse= a linguistic unit of more than one sentence on a topic. Phrasal verbs= verbs+prepositions-an English phenomenon? Turn up/turn down/turn into/turn around/turn on/turn off/…. “The plane is taking off.” “Is the plane going to take off?” “I want you to take the hat off.” deixis- “she left it over there”.
  • 9. Keep this in mind- Our brains get used to receiving and giving meaning in a certain order. Language learners have to train their brains to accept meaning in a different order. Learning the rules of syntax does not necessarily re-train our brain’s semantic expectations! Think of it as doing mental gymnastics.
  • 10. Language Acquisition Different theorists = different theories Krashen Cummins Asher O’Malley and Chamot L2
  • 11. Language Acquisition - An Introduction to Language, ch’s 2, 8 & 9. Teaching ESL/EFL Listening and Speaking: ch’s 4, 6 & 8. Teachscape Module: Second Language Acquisition Theory and Policy Part 1. Learning our L1 Noam Chomsky- The Innateness Hypothesis: LAD, UG Pragmatics= the appropriate use of language in context L2 Acquisition and teaching methods ◦ TPR, Monitor Model, CALLA, BICS & CALP…
  • 12. Sociolinguistics A rose by any other name would smell as sweet… Telephonic aparatus telephone phone
  • 13. Sociolinguistics and Language Change –There’s more to communication than the words! An Introduction to Language: ch 10, 11. Other websites. Descriptive vs. prescriptive linguistics Dialect= a language variety used by any particular group of speakers. Regional dialect=when the dialect is used in a particular region. Social dialect=a dialect shared largely/only by speakers of the same social status Pidgin=a language developed by speakers of different languages to communicate with each other. Creole=a language begun as a “pidgin” that has evolved into a “native tongue” that is learned as the first language of the speakers’ children.
  • 14. Writing Systems The way it looks on screen…on paper…a scroll…papyrus…in stone…
  • 15. Writing Systems- An Introduction to Language, ch’s 12 & 6. The Diversity Kit, Part I, pgs. 25-65, and Part II, pgs. 1-30. Several additional web pages. Logographic=a symbol represents a whole word or morpheme (Chinese). Syllabic= a symbol represents a syllable. Consonantal=consonants are represented by symbols, and vowels are represented by diacritical marks. Alphabetic=a symbol (or combination of symbols) represents a vowel or consonant (English, European languages). Pictogram=symbols resemble the objects they represent. Ideogram=symbols that represent ideas. Logogram-symbols represent words or morphemes The Rebus Principle=allows for the evolution of ideographic writing systems by using one symbol for multiple homophones. Think of license plate messages, “BI2U”, or “4sale”. Works in Chinese, evolution of ancient Phoenician.
  • 16. Stuck? Use this contact information for the Course Mentor to give you help with SLO1, or any other ELL Course of Study Chris Aranda christina.aranda@wgu .edu 1-866-895-9660 x5150 Or click on the “Contact a Mentor” button in the COS or ELL Communities