Thomas Lockwood Danish slidedeck designthinking

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  • Hi Fred. You might want to change the title of this slide pack to why design thinking. This will make it easier to search. Watch video at http://www.ddc.dk/article/thomas-lockwood-why-design-thinking
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Thomas Lockwood Danish slidedeck designthinking

  1. 1. Hi :) Thomas Lockwood, PhD
  2. 2. WHY?
  3. 3. Design thinking is an efective way to find, and solve, the right problems
  4. 4. Copenhagen, 1960
  5. 5. Solving the right problems
  6. 6. Who What How When Where Why discovering unrealized needs, and learning from what people can’t say
  7. 7. Home cleaning - where and why? On Average (in the US): •  The kitchen floor is cleaned about once a week for up to 45 minutes •  Kitchen floor is swept daily •  Counter tops cleaned twice a day Typically used: •  Sponge mop 42% ; string mop 26% ; cloth 17% 30% of households buy 1.5 mops or brooms each year No brand recognition $300 million/year in sales of mops and brooms Reference Continuum
  8. 8. insights: •  People clean the floor, and then they clean the thing that they use to clean the floor. •  This involves water, actually making mud. •  Cleaning implements clean through entrainment of dirt. •  The better the thing is at cleaning the floor, the more difficult it is to clean. Reference Continuum
  9. 9. the discovery of… dirt Reference Continuum
  10. 10. Reference Continuum
  11. 11. platform & brand extension ideas: Reference Continuum
  12. 12. “experiential” evaluation: testing the experience Reference Continuum
  13. 13. Reference Continuum
  14. 14. an almost “self-cleaning” floor & + $1 billion/year new business!
  15. 15. Who What How When Where Why An innovation process "  A front end innovation process "  qualitative research, activity based, or ethnography "  collaborative cross-functional teams working in co-development with users "  Embracing “open innovation” and “co-development” "  visualization and/or demonstration of early and concepts "  rapid mock up of concepts "  encouraging failure as a means to quickly sort out the strongest ideas "  for developing new products, services and business models.
  16. 16. Who What How When Where Why An innovation process “We believe ‘design thinking’ is a catalyst for innovation and bringing new things into the world” - Stanford University, D-School at Institute of Design
  17. 17. Design thinking wikipedia:
 Design thinking is a process for practical, creative resolution of problems or issues that looks for an improved future result. It is the essential ability to combine empathy, creativity and rationality to meet user needs and drive business success. 

  18. 18. Who What How When Where Why Closing a fundamental gap Reference: Roger Martin, Rotman, University of Toronto 2008
  19. 19. Who What How When Where Why T shape people - First proposed by Insanti, 1993 - T-shaped people are experts in specific areas (T vertical stroke) and know how their discipline interacts with others (horizontal stroke) - In addition to specific disciplinary knowledge they are thus exposed to experience and knowledge in other disciplines
  20. 20. Personal development, skills needed for ID 2.0: -  design (vertical skills) -  technical (horizontal skills) -  business & management (horizontal skills) Reference: Iansiti, 1993
  21. 21. The curriculum for MBA and other general management master’s programs should include instruction in the following core areas - “Financial reporting, analysis and markets MBA requirements, by - Domestic and global economic environments of organizations AACSB - Creation and distribution of goods and services, and - Human behavior in organizations. - The MBA curriculum normally should require a minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the MBA core areas. A minimum of 18 hours is required in courses outside the area of specialization, if any. Basic skills in written and oral communication, quantitative analysis, and computer usage should be achieved either by prior experience and education, or as part of the MBA curriculum”. DESIGN STRATEGY - 30TH June 2010 Source: AACSB curriculum guidelines
  22. 22. The curriculum for MBA and other general management master’s programs should include instruction in the following core areas - “Financial reporting, analysis and markets MBA requirements, by - Domestic and global economic environments of organizations AACSB - Creation and distribution of goods and services, and - Human behavior in organizations. - The MBA curriculum normally should require a minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the MBA core areas. A minimum of 18 hours is required in courses outside the area of specialization, if any. Basic skills in written and oral communication, quantitative analysis, and computer usage should be achieved either by prior experience and education, or as part of the MBA curriculum”. DESIGN STRATEGY - 30TH June 2010 Source: AACSB curriculum guidelines
  23. 23. The Harvard Business Review May 2008
  24. 24. The Harvard Business Review May 2008
  25. 25. The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida, 2002   The Creative Age   The Creative Economy   The Creative Class
  26. 26. A Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink, 2005   Why right-brainers will rule the future   Six senses:   1. Design   2. Store   3. Symphony   4. Empathy   5. Play   6. Meaning
  27. 27. a “design thinker’s” personality profile   Empathy   Integrative thinking   Optimism   Experimentation   Collaboration Reference: Tim Brown
  28. 28. Who What How When Where Why At the front end of innovation here
  29. 29. Who What How When Where Why Also during continuous improvement here here here here
  30. 30. Who What How When Where Why Well, actually, most anytime here here here here here here here here here here
  31. 31. Who What How When Where Why Designers, researchers, product mgrs, brand mgrs, end users, the mail clerk, administrators, executives; most anyone "  Designer led "  Business led "  People interested in discovering unarticulated needs "  To solve problems. The right problems.
  32. 32. Traditional context: 
 company, brand
 existing products and services
 perceived mission, culture, and brand values brand character, VBL, etc Briefing point by stage gate ideas Design strategy Design management Focus on efficiency, coherency
  33. 33. New context: no brief, just problems ideas First, looking to solve the right problems “the architecture of the problem” This may be products or services or integrated design solutions
  34. 34. “Adventure phase” ”Develop phase” TQM/ISO/DM/ other
 Discover Define, Design and Deliver ideas
  35. 35. Design thinking is not a substitute for "  Design strategy, "  Visual brand language, "  Building a design organization and operations, "  Design management, or "  Design leadership. "  Rather, is it a complementary discipline
  36. 36. Who What How When Where Why A way to discover and solve the right problems "  Simple to complex innovation ideas "  New products or services "  “Wicked problems” "  Systems complexity "  The things we are forced to deal with today!
  37. 37. Who What How When Where Why “Businesspeople are from Mars, and designers are from Venus”
 Hartmut Esslinger, 2007

  38. 38. Who What How When Where Why “Businesspeople are from Mars, and designers are from Venus”
 Hartmut Esslinger, 2007 Design Thinking brings them closer together
  39. 39. Who What How When Where Why Reference Gary Van Patter
  40. 40. Who What How When Where Why Reference Gary Van Patter
  41. 41. Who What How When Where Why Reference Gary Van Patter
  42. 42. Who What How When Where Why Reference Gary Van Patter
  43. 43. Business strategy Business alliances Software engineering Hardware engineering Industrial design Interface design Legal / IP E-commerce Marketing strategy Marketing comm Money A visionary leader
  44. 44. Business strategy Business alliances Software engineering Hardware engineering Industrial design Interface design Legal / IP E-commerce Marketing strategy Marketing comm Money A visionary leader
  45. 45. Reference: Rotman, University of Toronto 2008
  46. 46. Red dot design index; stock performance of the winners of red dot design team of the year, 2003-2007. (Adidas, Apple, Audi, BMW, Daimler, LG Electronics, Nokia, Philips, Siemens, Sony and Tupperware)
  47. 47. Shares in design-led businesses outperform key stock market indices by 200%. Source: Design Council
  48. 48. Charles and Ray Eames
  49. 49. WHY?
  50. 50. WHY NOT?
  51. 51. Connect and DMI connects you (design leaders) to the inspiration, knowledge and community you need to succeed. Transform
  52. 52. Thank you ! dmi.org lockwood@dmi.org

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