Riverdale & Ideo's Desigh Thinking toolkit for educators
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Riverdale & Ideo's Desigh Thinking toolkit for educators

on

  • 3,453 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,453
Views on SlideShare
3,015
Embed Views
438

Actions

Likes
19
Downloads
224
Comments
0

12 Embeds 438

http://unitedstory.org 240
http://blog.deandreanichols.com 109
http://www.bagtheweb.com 39
http://www.slideshare.net 19
http://pedagogyweekly.blogspot.com 14
http://paper.li 6
http://blog.catalystsbydesign.com 3
http://localhost.bagtheweb.com 3
http://pedagogyweekly.blogspot.com.au 2
http://activitybasededucation.blogspot.com 1
http://pedagogyweekly.blogspot.sg 1
http://activitybasededucation.blogspot.in 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Riverdale & Ideo's Desigh Thinking toolkit for educators Riverdale & Ideo's Desigh Thinking toolkit for educators Document Transcript

  • DesignThinking for Educators Version One | April 2011
  • Use your classroom space in different ways? Support healthy habits inside and outside your school?Are You Connect more effectivelyLooking with parents?To...? Find new ways to teach old content? Recruit the best teachers to your school? Develop better systems of feedback between teachers? Re-envision arrival and departure procedures at your school? Then you’re in the right place.
  • This toolkit can help you This toolkit offers you new create solutions for every- ways to be intentional and day challenges. collaborative when you are designing. It hones your It equips you with the pro- skills and empowers you to cess and methods of design. create desirable solutions. Businesses, social entrepre- neurs and other innovators This is an invitation toThis is a have used them for decades to create solutions for many different types of challenges. experiment with the design process. Let it inspire you to approach challenges differ-Tookit. In this toolkit, these methods are adapted specifically for ently and experience how Design Thinking adds a newFor You. educators, because as an edu- perspective to your work. cator, you design every day. You design your classroom, you design curriculum, you design learning environments for your students, and you design experiences and inter- actions for your colleagues.Having a process that In some ways, I have Design Thinking has I used to be quick tobrings people together always had elements made me look at our impose restrictionsto create more and of Design Thinking in curriculum in a whole on myself. I couldbetter ideas has been the way that I have new way. Incorporating easily convince myselfvery valuable for us. worked and thought Design Thinking with why a project wouldn’t about schools, but I Grant Wiggins’ Under- work before ever giv-Karen, have had no real pro- standing by Design, ing it a chance. SinceLearning Specialist cess to validate some I can research deeper, I have been exposed of my ideas. I was come up with more to Design Thinking, looking for approaches ideas and prototype I have made a stron- that combined the lessons. I have also ger effort to explore logical rigor of study started to collect ideas. My students in a traditional dis- feedback as inspira- have become part of cipline with a more tion to come up with my research team. The open and creative new lessons or to feedback they provide approach to thinking. adapt a lesson plan has helped me create Design Thinking offers for the next time. lessons that are more a way of problem student-centered. solving that is more Michael, integrative of differ- 2nd Grade Teacher Patrick, ent modes of thought. 3rd Grade Teacher It validates some of the things that teach- ers already do, but also gives the oppor- tunity to revisit one’s practice. Dominic, Head of School
  • Guide
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 2ContentsGuide DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3 It’s Experimental. Design In short, Design Thinking DT for Ed | Guide | p. 4 The design process is what It’s a deeply human approach DT for Ed | Guide | p. 5 The design process may The design process therefore DT for Ed | Guide | p. 6 current students in the year Over the course of the follow- Thinking creates a real space is the confidence that new, puts Design Thinking into that relies on your ability seem very straightforward integrates various modes 2060. They imagined what ing school year, the teachers to try something new. It better things are possible action. It’s a structured to be intuitive, to interpret at first glance, but there is of working: some steps are these people had done in tested many ideas in their gives you permission to fail and that you can make them approach to generating and what you observe and to one important aspect to more reflective, others are their lives and careers. As a classes. One teacher devel- and to learn from your mis- happen. And that kind of evolving ideas. Its five phases develop ideas that are emo- understand: its real value hands-on, and some encour- group, the teachers then cap- oped new communications takes, because you come up optimism is well-needed in help navigate the develop- tionally meaningful to those lies in the mix of tangible age interactions with people tured the most interesting for parents. The technology with new ideas, get feedback education. ment from identifying a you are designing for—all problem solving and abstract outside of your team. To help themes and worked back- team built new tools to sup- on them, then iterate. Given design challenge to finding skills you are well versed in thinking. The very concrete you know what to expect, ward to understand the skills port teachers in Investigative What is Design the range of needs your students have, your work will never be finished or “solved.” Classrooms and schools across the world are facing design challenges every The Design and building a solution. as an educator. One Thing observations of the first phase are abstracted as you define themes and insights. the following indicators will guide you through the meth- ods in the Toolkit section: Case Study these people would have needed to develop as chil- dren to be successful. Armed Learning. Another teacher even received a grant to reno- vate a classroom and create Thinking? It is always in progress. Yet there is an underlying expec- single day, from integrating technology to increasing par- Process to Keep Only after you have devel- oped a sense of meaning Reflective Ormondale with this inspiration from their own experiences, the a different learning environ- ment for her students. They in Mind Elementary tation that educators must ent involvement to improving and direction do you develop Hands-On group then went to visit out- didn’t go it alone: to build Design Thinking is a mindset. It’s Human-Centered. strive for perfection, that daily schedules. Wherever tangible solutions. What side organizations that were a network of learning and Design Thinking begins by they may not make mistakes, they fall on the spectrum of Phases may seem like a detour in Interaction facing analogous challenges. support, the staff dedicated School Thinking like a designer can understanding the needs that they should always be scale, the challenges educa- idea development ultimately Through interpreting all this time in their weekly meetings transform the way you and motivations of people— flawless role models. This tors are confronted with are makes your solutions much This design process can be information, the participants to discuss what was happen- approach the world when in this case, the students, kind of expectation makes it real, complex and varied. As more meaningful. applied in many forms. The came up with many genera- ing, learn from each other, imagining and creating new teachers, parents, staff and hard to take risks. It limits the such, they require new per- following pages contain a tive questions, such as “how and help each other through solutions for the future: administrators who make possibilities to create more spectives, new tools, and new discovery interpretation ideation experimentation evolution It requires taking a step back variety of examples of how might we enable the globally rough patches. it’s about being aware of up your everyday world. You radical change. But educa- approaches. Design Thinking to reflect, analyze, evaluate, it has been used to create aware student?” and “how the world around you, talk with these people, you tors need to experiment, too, is one of them. think again and then evolve. new, relevant solutions in an might we provide opportuni- In their second year, the believing that you play a role listen to them, you consider and Design Thinking is all This takes time—a scarce educational context. ties for interest-driven learn- group got back together in shaping that world, and how best to help them do about learning by doing. resource—and can be chal- ing?” The brainstorms that for a second workshop to taking action toward a more good work. Design Think- lenging, as educators are followed started with ideas make sense of all the experi- desirable future. Design ing begins from this place of It’s Optimistic. Design I have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new. used to solving problems on about tools and classroom ments they had conducted How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it? Thinking gives you faith in deep empathy and builds on Thinking is the fundamental the spot in their classrooms. design and expanded out around the school. During your creative abilities and the power of these empa- belief that we all can create Discovery builds a solid Interpretation transforms Ideation means generat- Experimentation brings Evolution is the develop- But there are no shortcuts. to include curriculum and this session, they shared and The more abstract a process to take action thetic questions and insights. change—no matter how foundation for your ideas. your stories into mean- ing lots of ideas. Brain- your ideas to life. Building ment of your concept steps often feel The small, sometimes hidden, the educational system as a discussed their experiences, through when faced with a big a problem, how little time Creating meaningful ingful insights. Observa- storming encourages you prototypes means making over time. It involves plan- more intense, details often hold the keys to whole. Through prototyping created a typology of Investi- solutions for students, par- tions, field visits, or just a to think expansively ideas tangible, learning ning next steps, communi- difficult challenge. It’s Collaborative. Design or how small a budget. No but pay off in solving complex challenges. several of these ideas, the gative Learning methods, ents, teachers, colleagues simple conversation can and without constraints. while building them, and cating the idea to people the long run. how might Thinking requires conver- matter what constraints and administrators be great inspiration—but It’s often the wildest ideas sharing them with other who can help you realize When the teachers and teachers saw a set of similar and developed a framework sation, critique and all-out exist around you, designing begins with a deep under- finding meaning in that that spark visionary people. Even with early it, and documenting the administrators at Ormondale patterns emerge across all for Investigative Learning we create can be an enjoyable process. standing for their needs. ABSTrACT standards and assessments. teamwork. And that’s some- and turning it into action- thoughts. With careful and rough prototypes, process. Change often elementary, a public K-3 their prototypes: they were Discovery means opening able opportunities for preparation and a clear you can receive a direct happens over time, and thing that might be a bit of school in California, wanted all passionate about a teach- a shift, because despite up to new opportunities, and getting inspired to design is not an easy task. It involves storytelling, set of rules, a brainstorm session can yield hun- response and learn how to further improve and reminders of even subtle signs of progress are a 21st century to find ways to bring 21st ing and learning approach Today, the faculty at Ormon- the fact that educators are that they called Investiga- dale elementary School are learning expe- create new ideas. With the as well as sorting and dreds of fresh ideas. refine an idea. important. century skills into their surrounded by people all right preparation, this can condensing thoughts until classrooms, they knew the tive Learning. This approach continuing to evolve their rience for day long, teaching remains be eye-opening and will you’ve found a compelling would address students not approach to Investigative challenge would take time give you a good under- point of view and clear an often solitary profession. and long-term commitment. as receivers of information, Learning. As new teachers our students? standing of your design direction for ideation. Still, addressing complex (or challenge. They chose a year-long time- but as shapers of knowledge. join the school, other faculty even not-so-complex) chal- frame and used the design At the end of the workshop, help them understand how lenges benefits significantly process to get started. the teachers planned and to construct these experi- from the views of multiple Find videos about committed to experiments ences, and they have created perspectives, and others’ cre- Investigative Learning During the summer, the based on this philosophy that a “Manual of Investigative at Ormondale at ativity bolstering your own. pvsd.net. teachers kicked off the proj- they could conduct in their Learning” to keep track of ect with a two-day Design classrooms. their philosophy and meth- Thinking workshop. The ods. They have gained sup- Discovery phase began with port from their school board, CONCreTe an activity that asked them and have become recognized to develop empathy for a as a “California Distinguished learner in the 21st century: School.” the exercise entailed teach- dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOn ers imagining one of their3 4 5 6 DT for Ed | Guide | p. 7 In 2010, the faculty at river- After several experiments DT for Ed | Guide | p. 8 They turned to Design teachers] and the players DT for Ed | Guide | p. 9 enough theory—it’s time It’s Version One: this is not a dale Country School, an inde- with a few different collabo- Thinking to develop a game [kids] had different needs to take action. The Toolkit finished piece, it’s a foundation. pendent K-12 school in New ration tools, the riverdale and combined it with the and understood different provides you with instructions The Toolkit will evolve and York, embarked on a design teachers now have an online Backwards Design method- things. But the game actually to explore Design Thinking change based on your feed- project to encourage more platform for sharing lesson ology, which begins with had to meet all these needs yourself. back. That’s why we want to collaboration among teach- plans and activities as well the end goal in mind, to cre- simultaneously.” hear from you. Please send ers. With three teachers lead- as creating meeting agendas ate the educational content. us comments, stories, photos ing the process as facilita- to save time. “It seems to Using Backwards Design, Since launching, Motion Math or movies of your experiences Case Study tors, a group of 15 worked as a design team to take on the challenge. They started with be working for us. We’re shar- ing more as a team and we’ve freed up time to get more Case Study they were able to hone in on how they could assess students’ mastery of con- has been on the “Top 5” list of educational apps, was fea- tured in the Wall Street Jour- This is a Work using this toolkit to create new design solutions: DT_ed@ideo.com Riverdale observations and conversa- tions—not just in their own done in our meetings,” said one of the team members. Motion Math cepts and work from there to help them get the concepts nal, and won an excellence in Design Award from Children’s in Progress. Country School school, but also with analo- right. Using Design Thinking, Technology Review. Most gous environments. Splitting And there’s still a lot more they were able to create rewarding for Adauto and Collaborative into three teams, they inter- happening: teachers at a game that was fun, engag- Klein was the fact that insti- development of this toolkit, February- viewed employees at Sirius riverdale were so energized ing and valued by parents, tutional school purchases April 2011. XM, Consumer reports and by Design Thinking that they teachers and students alike. have been very strong. IDeO—organizations that submitted ideas for several “The most important part of Teachers have emailed them were noted for their team- design projects. In early merging the two processes videos of kids playing their work and collaboration. One 2011, they assembled a was iteration, being open to game in the classrooms, of the teacher-facilitators core team of five teachers to really listening to what people and students from preschool noted that this inspiration conduct a one-year project want,” observed Adauto. through community college was important to the team: to revise the school’s pro- are using the game to learn “It was really provocative. gram in character, conduct, Adauto and Klein started math skills. The founders are Discovery We saw that people have very and ethics. Another team of the process by defining a currently building on their different ways of managing teachers is helping to design challenge to create a game success and designing addi- their time and we developed a smooth transition for the that would address the tional educational games a new awareness [of these new head of the elementary biggest stumbling block for to address other hurdles in how might companies].” school. Teachers are using elementary school kids. They elementary education. It was the prototyp- Design Thinking in their went out to talk to teachers. we create a ing and feedback that made me really see Bringing this inspiration classrooms and are sharing how might we When the founders of Motion Over and over, they heard develop games back on-site, the team dis- their enthusiasm and ideas that fractions were a huge Interpretation the value in this pro- Math got together to think culture of col- Read more about cess. We have become cussed their learnings and with their colleagues. The about how to use games pain point. Next, they looked Motion Math at a more effective team laboration? that now shares ideas, resources and feedback clustered them into three themes: online tools, faculty impact has expanded way beyond the initial design proj- to tackle the to help kids learn, they knew that teaching math and for inspiration from the most popular games at the time, motionmathgames.com. on a regular basis. spaces and team-building ect and continues to spread. toughest learn- designing a product weren’t one of which had a bouncing activities. They identified device to move a character ing hurdles? Michael, the same thing. Both teach- 1st Grade Teacher opportunities for design ers who worked with ele- around a screen. From there, within these areas, and brain- mentary-school-aged kids, the team started brainstorm- Ideation stormed dozens of ideas. In Gabriel Adauto and Jacob ing, and generated lots of smaller groups, they built dif- Klein began their project with ideas for interactive games ferent prototypes, including an understanding of both that could help kids learn an online collaboration tool what kids liked and what par- fractions. Many prototypes to make faculty meetings ents and teachers valued— and feedback sessions later, more effective, a new faculty but they also recognized that Adauto and Klein launched lounge, and potluck brunches their experience and intuition Motion Math. “We did lots to bring teachers together in alone weren’t enough to of feedback sessions with Experimentation casual settings. design a successful learning paper prototypes. The most product. valuable feedback session we had was with parents, teachers and kids all together. We saw how the groups inter- act, and it helped us realize that the payers [parents and Evolution7 8 9
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 3 It’s Experimental. Design In short, Design Thinking Thinking creates a real space is the confidence that new, to try something new. It better things are possible gives you permission to fail and that you can make them and to learn from your mis- happen. And that kind of takes, because you come up optimism is well-needed in with new ideas, get feedback education. on them, then iterate. GivenWhat is Design the range of needs your students have, your work will never be finished or “solved.” Classrooms and schools across the world are facing design challenges everyThinking? It is always in progress. Yet there is an underlying expec- tation that educators must single day, from integrating technology to increasing par- ent involvement to improvingDesign Thinking is a mindset. It’s Human-Centered. strive for perfection, that daily schedules. Wherever Design Thinking begins by they may not make mistakes, they fall on the spectrum ofThinking like a designer can understanding the needs that they should always be scale, the challenges educa-transform the way you and motivations of people— flawless role models. This tors are confronted with areapproach the world when in this case, the students, kind of expectation makes it real, complex and varied. Asimagining and creating new teachers, parents, staff and hard to take risks. It limits the such, they require new per-solutions for the future: administrators who make possibilities to create more spectives, new tools, and newit’s about being aware of up your everyday world. You radical change. But educa- approaches. Design Thinkingthe world around you, talk with these people, you tors need to experiment, too, is one of them.believing that you play a role listen to them, you consider and Design Thinking is allin shaping that world, and how best to help them do about learning by doing.taking action toward a more good work. Design Think-desirable future. Design ing begins from this place of It’s Optimistic. DesignThinking gives you faith in deep empathy and builds on Thinking is the fundamentalyour creative abilities and the power of these empa- belief that we all can createa process to take action thetic questions and insights. change—no matter howthrough when faced with a big a problem, how little timedifficult challenge. It’s Collaborative. Design or how small a budget. No Thinking requires conver- matter what constraints sation, critique and all-out exist around you, designing teamwork. And that’s some- can be an enjoyable process. thing that might be a bit of a shift, because despite the fact that educators are surrounded by people all day long, teaching remains an often solitary profession. Still, addressing complex (or even not-so-complex) chal- lenges benefits significantly from the views of multiple perspectives, and others’ cre- ativity bolstering your own.
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 4 The design process is what It’s a deeply human approach puts Design Thinking into that relies on your ability action. It’s a structured to be intuitive, to interpret approach to generating and what you observe and to evolving ideas. Its five phases develop ideas that are emo- help navigate the develop- tionally meaningful to those ment from identifying a you are designing for—all design challenge to finding skills you are well versed inThe Design and building a solution. as an educator.ProcessPhASeS dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOnI have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new.How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it?Discovery builds a solid Interpretation transforms Ideation means generat- Experimentation brings Evolution is the develop-foundation for your ideas. your stories into mean- ing lots of ideas. Brain- your ideas to life. Building ment of your conceptCreating meaningful ingful insights. Observa- storming encourages you prototypes means making over time. It involves plan-solutions for students, par- tions, field visits, or just a to think expansively ideas tangible, learning ning next steps, communi-ents, teachers, colleagues simple conversation can and without constraints. while building them, and cating the idea to peopleand administrators be great inspiration—but It’s often the wildest ideas sharing them with other who can help you realizebegins with a deep under- finding meaning in that that spark visionary people. Even with early it, and documenting thestanding for their needs. and turning it into action- thoughts. With careful and rough prototypes, process. Change oftenDiscovery means opening able opportunities for preparation and a clear you can receive a direct happens over time, andup to new opportunities, design is not an easy task. set of rules, a brainstorm response and learn how reminders of even subtleand getting inspired to It involves storytelling, session can yield hun- to further improve and signs of progress arecreate new ideas. With the as well as sorting and dreds of fresh ideas. refine an idea. important.right preparation, this can condensing thoughts untilbe eye-opening and will you’ve found a compellinggive you a good under- point of view and clearstanding of your design direction for ideation.challenge.
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 5 The design process may The design process therefore seem very straightforward integrates various modes at first glance, but there is of working: some steps are one important aspect to more reflective, others are understand: its real value hands-on, and some encour- lies in the mix of tangible age interactions with people problem solving and abstract outside of your team. To help thinking. The very concrete you know what to expect,One Thing observations of the first phase are abstracted as you define themes and insights. the following indicators will guide you through the meth- ods in the Toolkit section:to Keep Only after you have devel- oped a sense of meaning Reflectivein Mind and direction do you develop Hands-On tangible solutions. What may seem like a detour in Interaction idea development ultimately makes your solutions much This design process can be more meaningful. applied in many forms. The following pages contain a It requires taking a step back variety of examples of how to reflect, analyze, evaluate, it has been used to create think again and then evolve. new, relevant solutions in an This takes time—a scarce educational context. resource—and can be chal- lenging, as educators are used to solving problems on the spot in their classrooms. But there are no shortcuts.The more abstractsteps often feel The small, sometimes hidden,more intense, details often hold the keys tobut pay off in solving complex challenges.the long run.ABSTRACTCONCReTe dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOn
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 6 current students in the year Over the course of the follow- 2060. They imagined what ing school year, the teachers these people had done in tested many ideas in their their lives and careers. As a classes. One teacher devel- group, the teachers then cap- oped new communications tured the most interesting for parents. The technology themes and worked back- team built new tools to sup- ward to understand the skills port teachers in InvestigativeCase Study these people would have needed to develop as chil- dren to be successful. Armed Learning. Another teacher even received a grant to reno- vate a classroom and createOrmondale with this inspiration from their own experiences, the a different learning environ- ment for her students. TheyElementary group then went to visit out- didn’t go it alone: to build side organizations that were a network of learning and facing analogous challenges. support, the staff dedicatedSchool Through interpreting all this time in their weekly meetings information, the participants to discuss what was happen- came up with many genera- ing, learn from each other, tive questions, such as “how and help each other through might we enable the globally rough patches. aware student?” and “how might we provide opportuni- In their second year, the ties for interest-driven learn- group got back together ing?” The brainstorms that for a second workshop to followed started with ideas make sense of all the experi- about tools and classroom ments they had conducted design and expanded out around the school. During to include curriculum and this session, they shared and the educational system as a discussed their experiences, whole. Through prototyping created a typology of Investi- several of these ideas, the gative Learning methods,how might When the teachers and teachers saw a set of similar and developed a framework administrators at Ormondale patterns emerge across all for Investigative Learningwe create elementary, a public K-3 school in California, wanted their prototypes: they were all passionate about a teach- standards and assessments.a 21st century to find ways to bring 21st ing and learning approach Today, the faculty at Ormon- that they called Investiga- dale elementary School arelearning expe- century skills into their classrooms, they knew the tive Learning. This approach continuing to evolve theirrience for challenge would take time and long-term commitment. would address students not as receivers of information, approach to Investigative Learning. As new teachersour students? They chose a year-long time- but as shapers of knowledge. join the school, other faculty frame and used the design At the end of the workshop, help them understand how process to get started. the teachers planned and to construct these experi-Find videos about committed to experiments ences, and they have createdInvestigative Learning During the summer, the based on this philosophy that a “Manual of Investigativeat Ormondale atpvsd.net. teachers kicked off the proj- they could conduct in their Learning” to keep track of ect with a two-day Design classrooms. their philosophy and meth- Thinking workshop. The ods. They have gained sup- Discovery phase began with port from their school board, an activity that asked them and have become recognized to develop empathy for a as a “California Distinguished learner in the 21st century: School.” the exercise entailed teach- ers imagining one of their
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 7 In 2010, the faculty at River- After several experiments dale Country School, an inde- with a few different collabo- pendent K-12 school in New ration tools, the Riverdale York, embarked on a design teachers now have an online project to encourage more platform for sharing lesson collaboration among teach- plans and activities as well ers. With three teachers lead- as creating meeting agendas ing the process as facilita- to save time. “It seems toCase Study tors, a group of 15 worked as a design team to take on the challenge. They started with be working for us. We’re shar- ing more as a team and we’ve freed up time to get moreRiverdale observations and conversa- tions—not just in their own done in our meetings,” said one of the team members.Country School school, but also with analo- gous environments. Splitting And there’s still a lot more into three teams, they inter- happening: teachers at viewed employees at Sirius Riverdale were so energized XM, Consumer Reports and by Design Thinking that they IDeO—organizations that submitted ideas for several were noted for their team- design projects. In early work and collaboration. One 2011, they assembled a of the teacher-facilitators core team of five teachers to noted that this inspiration conduct a one-year project was important to the team: to revise the school’s pro- “It was really provocative. gram in character, conduct, We saw that people have very and ethics. Another team of different ways of managing teachers is helping to design their time and we developed a smooth transition for the a new awareness [of these new head of the elementaryhow might companies].” school. Teachers are using It was the prototyp- Design Thinking in their ing and feedback thatwe create a made me really see the value in this pro- Bringing this inspiration back on-site, the team dis- classrooms and are sharing their enthusiasm and ideasculture of col- cess. We have become a more effective team cussed their learnings and with their colleagues. The impact has expanded waylaboration? that now shares ideas, clustered them into three resources and feedback themes: online tools, faculty beyond the initial design proj- on a regular basis. spaces and team-building ect and continues to spread. Michael, activities. They identified 1st Grade Teacher opportunities for design within these areas, and brain- stormed dozens of ideas. In smaller groups, they built dif- ferent prototypes, including an online collaboration tool to make faculty meetings more effective, a new faculty lounge, and potluck brunches to bring teachers together in casual settings.
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 8 They turned to Design teachers] and the players Thinking to develop a game [kids] had different needs and combined it with the and understood different Backwards Design method- things. But the game actually ology, which begins with had to meet all these needs the end goal in mind, to cre- simultaneously.” ate the educational content. Using Backwards Design, Since launching, Motion MathCase Study they were able to hone in on how they could assess students’ mastery of con- has been on the “Top 5” list of educational apps, was fea- tured in the Wall Street Jour-Motion Math cepts and work from there to help them get the concepts right. Using Design Thinking, nal, and won an excellence in Design Award from Children’s Technology Review. Most they were able to create rewarding for Adauto and a game that was fun, engag- Klein was the fact that insti- ing and valued by parents, tutional school purchases teachers and students alike. have been very strong. “The most important part of Teachers have emailed them merging the two processes videos of kids playing their was iteration, being open to game in the classrooms, really listening to what people and students from preschool want,” observed Adauto. through community college are using the game to learn Adauto and Klein started math skills. The founders are the process by defining a currently building on their challenge to create a game success and designing addi- that would address the tional educational games biggest stumbling block for to address other hurdles in elementary school kids. They elementary education. went out to talk to teachers.how might we When the founders of Motion Over and over, they heard Read more aboutdevelop games Math got together to think that fractions were a huge Motion Math at about how to use games pain point. Next, they looked motionmathgames.com.to tackle the to help kids learn, they knew that teaching math and for inspiration from the most popular games at the time,toughest learn- designing a product weren’t one of which had a bouncing device to move a charactering hurdles? the same thing. Both teach- ers who worked with ele- around a screen. From there, mentary-school-aged kids, the team started brainstorm- Gabriel Adauto and Jacob ing, and generated lots of Klein began their project with ideas for interactive games an understanding of both that could help kids learn what kids liked and what par- fractions. Many prototypes ents and teachers valued— and feedback sessions later, but they also recognized that Adauto and Klein launched their experience and intuition Motion Math. “We did lots alone weren’t enough to of feedback sessions with design a successful learning paper prototypes. The most product. valuable feedback session we had was with parents, teachers and kids all together. We saw how the groups inter- act, and it helped us realize that the payers [parents and
  • DT for Ed | Guide | p. 9 enough theory—it’s time It’s Version One: this is not a to take action. The Toolkit finished piece, it’s a foundation. provides you with instructions The Toolkit will evolve and to explore Design Thinking change based on your feed- yourself. back. That’s why we want to hear from you. Please send us comments, stories, photos or movies of your experiencesThis is a Work using this toolkit to create new design solutions: DT_ed@ideo.comin Progress. Collaborative development of this toolkit, February- April 2011.DiscoveryInterpretationIdeationExperimentationEvolution
  • DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 1 Toolkit
  • DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 2 DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 3 Are you curious to explore There is a reason for the DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 4 This toolkit guides you The methods are the core DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 5 DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 6 This overview lists all the Design Thinking and try it sequence—each step of the through the design process piece of this toolkit: they methods you will find in the out yourself? This document process builds on the other. in five phases and twelve offer the actual instructions next section of this docu- explains how to do so. And often it makes a lot of steps. every phase has a that help you put Design ment. There are many, in sense to follow it in a linear distinct purpose and feel to Thinking to action. each order to provide you with As you start to experience way. But don’t feel restricted it. That’s why you find a brief method includes concise a rich variety to choose from: the design process, many by that: only you know how introduction to each one of explanations, useful sugges- every challenge requires a parts of it will feel familiar to to best use this toolkit. Use them, and an outline of which tions and tips to make it work. different approach and a Explore you: they are based on capa- bilities you have and use in your daily work. Sometimes, it along with other meth- odologies and theories you find useful to develop ideas. The Design steps to take and when. Method Some methods are hands-on, others are more Method different set of methods. You should select the ones that Pages are most valuable for you. This Toolkit Process Index reflective, and however, you will feel chal- Adapt it, annotate it, cut it some involve up, reconstruct it and make it Adjust to fit lenged and get stuck. And people outside of your team your schedule it’s easy to lose sight of your your own. Add new methods overall goal once you have to your toolkit as you see fit. begun to explore. All that is PHASeS PHASeSContents perfectly normal. Make sure So, plow in. Have fun with it. you regularly take a step Discover what happens to Discovery | 1.4 DT for Ed | Toolkit Some methods back and reconsider where your practice as an educa- need focused you are. Discuss the chal- tor as you begin to think and time, others lenges you have run into, and work like a designer. DISCOvERy InTERPRETaTIOn IDEaTIOn ExPERIMEnTaTIOn EvOLuTIOn Cut up and step Define Challenge Mode Reflective Time Needed ~30-45 min Time Type Intermittent can be used DISCOvERy InTERPRETaTIOn IDEaTIOn ExPERIMEnTaTIOn EvOLuTIOn in shorter think about these moments reassemble as you see intervals MeTHoDS as valuable learning oppor- tunities. Then, keep looking Build your own fit Share Chances are good that you already have some knowledge about the topic. 1. Define the Challenge 4. Tell Stories 7. Generate Ideas 9. Make Prototypes 11. Evaluate Learnings What You ahead: optimism is essential method. Share and document this knowledge, 1.1 Understand the challenge 4.1 Capture your learnings 7.1 Prepare for brainstorming 9.1 Create a prototype 11.1 Integrate feedback in order to get to new ideas. so you can build on it and are free to I have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new. Know 1.2 Define your audience 4.2 Share inspiring stories 7.2 Facilitate brainstorming 11.2 Define success DT for Ed | Toolkit What and Why Phase (Circle one) (Circle one) (Shade in) (Circle one) Step Mode Time Needed Time Type How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it? focus on discovering what you don’t 1.3 Build a team 7.3 Select promising ideas 10. Get Feedback yet know. (Method title) (Overview) Some 1.4 Share what you know 5. Search for Meaning 7.4 Build to think 12. Build the Experience STePS 10.1 Make a test plan methods (Circle number) 1. Define the Challenge 4. Tell Stories 7. Generate Ideas 9. Make Prototypes 11. Evaluate Learnings require 5.1 Find themes 10.2 Identify sources for 12.1 Identify what’s needed Team larger 2. Prepare Research 8. Refine Ideas feedback teams, 5.2 Make sense of findings 12.2 Pitch your concept 10.3 Invite feedback Where it gets you (Instructions) others Team 2.1 Make a plan 5.3 Define insights 8.1 Do a reality check 12.3 Build partnerships What to keep in mind are easier 2-6 People participants to do with Fold in 2.2 Identify sources of 8.2 Describe your idea 12.4 Plan next steps 10.4 Build a question guide a small half inspiration group 6. Frame Opportunities 10.5 Facilitate feedback 12.5 Document progress What it gets you 1. share what you know 2. Define what you don’t 2.3 Invite research 2. Prepare Research 5. Search for Meaning 8. Refine Ideas 10. Get Feedback 12. Build the Experience conversations 12.6 Share your story An overview of the team’s Post the design challenge know participants 6.1 Create a visual reminder knowledge and its open where everyone can see Write down and share These tips questions. it. With your team, write what you don’t know or 10.6 Capture feedback 2.4 Build a question guide 6.2 Make insights actionableToolkit down what you know yet understand about can be What to keep in mind about the topic. Use one the challenge. Post these learnings How To helpful Keep notes and look back piece of information per questions in a different 2.5 Prepare for fieldwork on how your point of view Post-it Note. Read your area. when you’re has changed after your notes out loud, and post stuck field research. them under the design 3. Build on your knowl- 2.6 Practice research challenge. Ask others for edge and fill in the gaps techniques Prototype of a feedback and discuss any Group the Post-it Notes of the assumptions that into themes and use them method during 3. Gather Inspiration 6. Frame Opportunities come up. to plan your research. the development Write down questions you of the toolkit. want to explore. 3. Gather Inspiration Plenty of 3.1 Immerse yourself in white space context to write 3.2 Learn from individuals notes 3.3 Learn from groups 3.4 Learn from experts MeTHoDS 3.5 Learn from peers observing peers 3.6 Learn from peoples’ Discovery | 1.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit iNTerPreTATioN | 4.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit iDeATioN | 7.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit exPeriMeNT. | 9.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit evoLuTioN | 12.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit self-documentation step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type Define Challenge Reflective ~1-2 hours Continuous Tell Stories Hands-On ~30-60 min Continuous Generate Ideas Hands-on ~45-60 mins Continuous Make Prototypes Hands-On ~45-90 min Intermittent Build the Experience Hands-On ~30-45 min Intermittent Understand A clearly defined challenge will guide your questions and help you stay on Share Share what you learned from your research as stories, not just general Facilitate Brainstorming is a great activity to generate fresh thoughts and new Create a Prototypes enable you to share your idea with other people and discuss Identify In order to realize your concept, you will need various resources and capa- the track throughout the process. Spend Inspiring statements. This will create common Brain- energy. Create a safe and positive Prototype how to further refine it. You can proto- What’s bilities, namely materials, money, time Challenge time with your team to create a com- mon understanding of what you are Stories knowledge that your team can use to imagine opportunities and ideas. storming atmosphere for your brainstorm so the team can come up with all kinds type just about anything. Choose the form that suits your idea best from Needed and people. Specify what exactly it will take to make your idea come to life. 3.7 Seek inspiration in working toward. of wild ideas. the list below. new places Team Team Team Team Team 2-3 People 2-6 People 6-8 People 2-4 People 2-4 People What it gets you 1. collect thoughts 3. Frame the challenge 4. create a visible What it gets you 1. set up a space » Personal details: who 4. capture the informa- What it gets you 1. select a facilitator 4. equip everyone for 6. Move one by one What it gets you create a storyboard create a story create a model What it gets you 1. specify materials 3. estimate timeframes A clear design challenge As a team, collect and Based on the thoughts reminder A shared understanding Plan your storytelling did you meet? (profes- tion in small pieces A lot of fresh, new ideas. Decide on a person to participation Post the question you are A tangible representation Keep a “parking lot” for Visualize the complete Tell the story of your idea Put together simple An overview of what it Make a list of all the mate- Specify the amount of expressed in one sentence. write down thoughts you have collected, frame Post the challenge in a of all the stories your team session in a room with sion, age, location etc) Write down notes and lead the group through Gather your team near brainstorming about on of your idea that you can questions that come up experience of your idea from the future. Describe three-dimensional rep- takes to realize your idea. rials you will need to build time that you’ll need to about your challenge. the challenge as one place that everyone on collected. plenty of wall space. » Interesting stories: what observations on Post-it What to keep in mind the activity. Familiarize a wall or flipchart. Give the wall so everyone can share and learn from. while you build proto- over time through a what the experience resentations of your idea. your concept. Are these create your concept. Do What to keep in mind Start with a broad view: sentence starting with an the team can see, to be Distribute Post-it Notes was the most memorable Notes while listening Brainstorming is a fast yourself with brainstorm- everyone a Post-it Pad see it. Ask participants to types. Revisit and answer series of images, sketches, would be like. Write a Use paper, cardboard, What to keep in mind supplies available at your you need time for prepa- A good challenge is ask yourself why people action verb, such as: “cre- reminded of your focus What to keep in mind and markers. Have a flip and surprising story? to a story. Use concise and dynamic activity. ing protocol. and a marker. Encourage take a few minutes and What to keep in mind them as you develop your cartoons or even just text newspaper article report- pipe cleaners, fabric and Your needs may be larger school? Will you need to ration? Does anyone need phrased with a sense of might need, want, or ate,” “define,” or “adapt.” throughout the process. Tell stories person by chart pad or large sheets » Motivations: what did this and complete sentences Have your team stand up people to draw and be write down their first Prototyping is not about idea further. blocks. Stick figures are ing about your idea. Write whatever else you can than the support you purchase any new assets? to be trained? Do you possibility. Make it broad engage with your topic. person, one at a time. of paper nearby, as well participant care about that everyone on your and encourage people 2. Present your topic visual. Remind them to ideas before starting as a getting it right the first great—you don’t need a job description. Create a find. Keep it rough and can receive from your want to use an existing enough to allow you to Or, phrase the challenge as tape to attach these the most? What motivates team can easily under- to speak up and keep it Briefly ntroduce the chal- write in large letters and group. Then facilitate the time: the best prototypes Capture the evolution of to be an artist. Use Post-it letter to be sent to parents. at a low fidelity to a start, school. Don’t give up. Find 2. calculate funds meeting time differently? discover areas of unex- 2. establish constraints as an engaging and imagi- Use vivid details and sheets to the wall. him/her? stand. Capture quotes— short: only take a few sec- lenge you are working on. to note only one idea per brainstorm and capture change significantly your prototype over time Notes or individual sheets Describe your idea as if and evolve the resolution ways to creatively make Money will always be pected value, and narrow Make a list of criteria and native question starting describe your immediate » Barriers: what frustrated they are a powerful way onds to explain an idea. Share some of the exciting Post-it. each individual idea. over time. Give yourself as you make changes and of paper to create the it were published on the over time. your concept work within a scarce resource in an 4. identify people enough to make the topic constraints for the chal- with: “How might we...?” experiences. This is not 2. Take turns him/her? of representing the voice stories from your Discov- permission to try, and fail, increase its resolution. storyboard so you can school website. those constraints. Can educational context. Don’t Create an overview of manageable. lenge. Does it need to fit or “What if…?” the time to generalize or Describe the individuals » Interactions: what was of a participant. ery phase. 5. start with a warm-up 7. Keep the energy high and try again. rearrange their order. create a role-play you involve an extra let this discourage you. people who can help into a certain timeframe? judge. you met and the places interesting about the way Choose a fun, easy or Provide encouragement create an ad Act out the experience person to lessen the work- Think about creative realize your idea. What Can it be integrated with Keep rewriting your you visited. Be specific he/she interacted with 5. surround yourself 3. introduce the rules of even unrelated activity or alternative topics if the Sometimes your worst create a diagram Create a fake advertise- of your idea. Try on the load? What can you do ways to hold a fundraiser. capabilities are you look- an existing structure or statement until it feels and talk about what actu- his/her environment? with stories brainstorming to get people in the right flow of ideas slows down. ideas teach you the most. Map out the structure, ment that promotes the roles of the people that with existing materials? Look into applying for a ing for? Who is invested initiative? approachable, under- ally happened. Revisit » Remaining Questions: Write large enough so that Explain each rule and mood: Switch to a new brain- Prototyping them may network, journey or best parts of your idea. are part of the situation grant. Consider opportu- in supporting the con- standable and actionable the notes you took right what questions would everyone can read your its purpose to set the » Warm-up brainstorm: storm question every lead to new inspiration. process of your idea. Try Have fun with it, and feel and uncover questions Reflect on how your nities to tap into existing cept? Do you need to find to everyone on the team. after your observation. you like to explore in your notes. Put all Post-its up on right tone for the activity. how might we find a fifteen to twenty minutes. different versions of your free to exaggerate shame- they might ask. idea will be sustained budgets. Don’t forget to someone to champion the Print out your photos next conversation? the wall on large sheets of You can find an over- needle in a haystack? Throw out some wild Challenge yourself to visualization. lessly. over time. Can it scale? explore how to realize idea? Capture your needs and use them to illustrate paper. Use one sheet per view of brainstorming » Never could we ever: ideas yourself. Remind come up with at least Will it live on without your idea without any on Post-its. Sort them and your stories. 3. Actively listen story, so you have an over- rules in the beginning brainstorm things you your team of the rules if three different versions of create a mock-up your involvement? Build money as a brainstorm identify which capabili- While you are listening view of all your experi- of this section. could never do at your needed. Set a goal for how your idea to test multiple Build mock-ups of digital a foundation for longer- challenge. ties you have inside your Tell the story of each to each other, compare ences and the people you school. many ideas you want to aspects of the possible tools and websites term impact. school, and which you‘ll person following these and contrast the things have met. » Get visual: ask everyone generate in total. solutions your team has with simple sketches of have to find externally. prompts (you may you have learned. Explore to draw his or her neigh- come up with. screens on paper. Paste Think about leveraging have already used them areas where you find bor in a minute. Share. the paper mock-up to the larger network and when capturing your different opinions and an actual computer including parents, alumni first impressions): contradictions. Begin to screen or mobile phone and/or neighbors. look for recurring themes. when demonstrating it. 3 4 5 6 DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 7 Are you new to Design To get started, use just DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 8 DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 9 DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 10 You can use the pages of DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 11 Invite variety: select people DT for Ed | Toolkit Thinking? Do you just have a limited period of time for the highlighted methods. They are the basic set that How might we design a new Professional Development Weekly Meetings. Claim a this toolkit to create a visual overview of the design who can contribute from different angles. Consider Spaces. A dedicated space, your design project? or do will lead you through the teaching module? Day. Transform a profes- common prep period or an process for your team. Then, involving an administrator, even if it’s just a wall, gives you want to give someone design process. As you sional development day into after school meeting for work- choose the methods you or a teacher you have never the team a physical reminder else a quick overview? become more familiar with a collaborative design work- ing on a design project. Use want to use for each step. worked with. You’ll have a of their work. It allows them Design Thinking, explore How might we adapt the school shop. To make the most of the methods in this toolkit to better chance of coming up to put up inspiring imagery schedule to the learning rhythms This page is for you. and add more methods to the day, define a challenge, determine the agenda each with unexpected solutions. or notes from their research Method your selection. Prepare of our students? Prepare assemble a team and identify sources of inspiration ahead of time. The large amount week. Meet regularly to build momentum, and provide opportunities for individual Prepare Prepare Assign roles: it helps every- one navigate the project if and to be continuously immersed in their learnings. Shared visual reminders help Selection Choose a How might we engage students Integrate Into of time set aside for a PD day is ideal for working through work and reflection on the days in between. Build an Overview Before You there is a clear understand- ing of what to contribute track the progress of the project and stay focused on Challenge Your Context Start Interpretation, Ideation, and to the team. This is particu- the challenge. more deeply in reading? experimentation. These are year-Long Commitment. DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit larly helpful when you can’t PHASeS intense and productive phases Decide what challenge is choose who to work with: To spark new ideas and get of the process, and will leave appropriate for a year- make agreements about unstuck when the work gets A design challenge is the How might we build school-family once you have decided the team with tangible ideas long commitment. Consider Before you begin, here are which responsibilities people more challenging, consider starting point of every design partnerships? multiple factors, such as Continous which challenge to work on, as evidence of your progress. a few tips that will help you can take on that brings out changing the space from process, and the purpose you periods of time you can start to plan your A professional development complexity, scope, peoples’ make the most out of your their strengths. Who will time to time. DISCOvERy InTERPRETaTIOn IDEaTIOn ExPERIMEnTaTIOn EvOLuTIOn will work toward. Here are a design project. The first, day is also an ideal chance involvement and priority. experience. be the coordinator, keep- Intermittent Interpre- Experimen- How might we create a space for few examples you can choose and likely quite challenging, to go out into the world and Then make a project calen- Discovery Evolution ing everything organized? MeTHoDS intervals of tation Ideation tation from, or use as inspiration time task will be to find the time seek inspiration. dar and commit to deadlines Who will be the enthusiast, 1. Define the Challenge 4. Tell Stories 7. Generate Ideas 9. Make Prototypes 11. Evaluate Learnings to come up with a challenge that matters for you. teacher collaboration? for your endeavor. Try to Summer Workshop. Com- and goals, as they create a sense of progress. Agree inspiring the team with big dreams? Who is the nagger, Materials. This process is visual, tactile and experi- integrate Design Thinking Teams. The team is stronger Discovery | 1.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit iNTerPreTATioN | 4.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit iDeATioN | 7.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit exPeriMeNT. | 9.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit evoLuTioN | 11.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type into the existing structures mit time during a prolonged on regular check-ins to keep than any individual—you making sure things keep ential. You often will create Define Challenge Reflective ~1-2 hours Continuous Tell Stories Hands-On ~30-60 min Continuous Generate Ideas Hands-on ~45-60 mins Continuous Make Prototypes Hands-On ~45-90 min Intermittent Evaluate Learnings Reflective ~30-60 min Continuous Understand Share How might we design our classroom Facilitate Create a Integrate DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit A clearly defined challenge will guide Share what you learned from your Brainstorming is a great activity Prototypes enable you to share your Feedback is invaluable to developing DEFINE TELL GENERATE mAkE EvALuATE your questions and help you stay on research as stories, not just general to generate fresh thoughts and new idea with other people and discuss an idea, but can also be quite confus- the Inspiring Brain- Prototype Feedback THE STORIES IDEAS PROTOTyPES LEARNINGS of your school’s schedule: break to dive into the design the momentum going. Be know this well as a guiding moving forward? Who will an overview that’s visible track throughout the process. Spend statements. This will create common energy. Create a safe and positive how to further refine it. You can proto- ing. It may be contradictory, or may not time with your team to create a com- knowledge that your team can use to atmosphere for your brainstorm so type just about anything. Choose align with your goals. Sort through the CHALLENGE Challenge mon understanding of what you are Stories imagine opportunities and ideas. storming the team can come up with all kinds the form that suits your idea best from responses you receive and decide on working toward. of wild ideas. the list below. what to integrate in your next iteration. That will make it easier to process. A continuous period intentional about how best to principle of education. lead the team? for everyone on the team, or Team 2-3 People Team 2-6 People Team 6-8 People Team 2-4 People Team 2-4 People space to be student-centered? follow through. Here are a of time allows for a deeper match the flow of the project And collaboration is inherent come up with a quick sketch few examples: engagement with each to the flow of the school year. to Design Thinking: having Allow for alone time: while to explain your idea. Make What it gets you 1. collect thoughts 3. Frame the challenge 4. create a visible What it gets you 1. set up a space » Personal details: who 4. capture the informa- What it gets you 1. select a facilitator 4. equip everyone for 6. Move one by one What it gets you create a storyboard create a story create a model What it gets you 1. cluster the feedback 2. evaluate the relevance 3. iterate your prototype A clear design challenge As a team, collect and Based on the thoughts reminder A shared understanding Plan your storytelling did you meet? (profes- tion in small pieces A lot of fresh, new ideas. Decide on a person to participation Post the question you are A tangible representation Keep a “parking lot” for Visualize the complete Tell the story of your idea Put together simple Iterations of your concept As a team, discuss the Take a moment to revisit Incorporate valuable expressed in one sentence. write down thoughts you have collected, frame Post the challenge in a of all the stories your team session in a room with sion, age, location etc) Write down notes and lead the group through Gather your team near brainstorming about on of your idea that you can questions that come up experience of your idea from the future. Describe three-dimensional rep- based on feedback. reactions you received where you started. Look feedback into your about your challenge. the challenge as one place that everyone on collected. plenty of wall space. » Interesting stories: what observations on Post-it What to keep in mind the activity. Familiarize a wall or flipchart. Give the wall so everyone can share and learn from. while you build proto- over time through a what the experience resentations of your idea. to your prototypes. Start at your earlier learnings concept. Make changes What to keep in mind Start with a broad view: sentence starting with an the team can see, to be Distribute Post-it Notes was the most memorable Notes while listening Brainstorming is a fast yourself with brainstorm- everyone a Post-it Pad see it. Ask participants to types. Revisit and answer series of images, sketches, would be like. Write a Use paper, cardboard, What to keep in mind by sharing the impres- and ideas. What was where people saw bar- A good challenge is ask yourself why people action verb, such as: “cre- reminded of your focus What to keep in mind and markers. Have a flip and surprising story? to a story. Use concise and dynamic activity. ing protocol. and a marker. Encourage take a few minutes and What to keep in mind them as you develop your cartoons or even just text newspaper article report- pipe cleaners, fabric and Do not take feedback sions you captured right your original intent? Does riers. Emphasize what phrased with a sense of might need, want, or ate,” “define,” or “adapt.” throughout the process. Tell stories person by chart pad or large sheets » Motivations: what did this and complete sentences Have your team stand up people to draw and be write down their first Prototyping is not about idea further. blocks. Stick figures are ing about your idea. Write whatever else you can literally. You don’t need to after your feedback con- it still hold true, based on was well received. Then, possibility. Make it broad engage with your topic. person, one at a time. of paper nearby, as well participant care about that everyone on your and encourage people 2. Present your topic visual. Remind them to ideas before starting as a getting it right the first great—you don’t need a job description. Create a find. Keep it rough and incorporate every sugges- versations. Take notes on the feedback you have create a new prototype phase. It’s an opportunity to a team of people who offer most of this work should be sure you have supplies on enough to allow you to Or, phrase the challenge as tape to attach these the most? What motivates team can easily under- to speak up and keep it Briefly ntroduce the chal- write in large letters and group. Then facilitate the time: the best prototypes Capture the evolution of to be an artist. Use Post-it letter to be sent to parents. at a low fidelity to a start, tion you receive. Look at Post-its. Sort and cluster received? that you can share. Go How might we connect more with discover areas of unex- 2. establish constraints as an engaging and imagi- Use vivid details and sheets to the wall. him/her? stand. Capture quotes— short: only take a few sec- lenge you are working on. to note only one idea per brainstorm and capture change significantly your prototype over time Notes or individual sheets Describe your idea as if and evolve the resolution feedback as an inspiration the feedback: what was through feedback cycles pected value, and narrow Make a list of criteria and native question starting describe your immediate » Barriers: what frustrated they are a powerful way onds to explain an idea. Share some of the exciting Post-it. each individual idea. over time. Give yourself as you make changes and of paper to create the it were published on the over time. for better ways of solving positively received? What Prioritize the feedback: repeatedly and continue enough to make the topic constraints for the chal- with: “How might we...?” experiences. This is not 2. Take turns him/her? of representing the voice stories from your Discov- permission to try, and fail, increase its resolution. storyboard so you can school website. the problem. For example, concerns came up? What what is most important to improve your concept. manageable. lenge. Does it need to fit or “What if…?” the time to generalize or Describe the individuals » Interactions: what was of a participant. ery phase. 5. start with a warm-up 7. Keep the energy high and try again. rearrange their order. create a role-play instead of reasoning that suggestions and builds to making it a success? into a certain timeframe? judge. you met and the places interesting about the way Choose a fun, easy or Provide encouragement create an ad Act out the experience “The participants didn’t did you find? Sort your notes and create Can it be integrated with Keep rewriting your you visited. Be specific he/she interacted with 5. surround yourself 3. introduce the rules of even unrelated activity or alternative topics if the Sometimes your worst create a diagram Create a fake advertise- of your idea. Try on the like the couches, so we an overview of which an existing structure or statement until it feels and talk about what actu- his/her environment? with stories brainstorming to get people in the right flow of ideas slows down. hand that make it easy to ideas teach you the most. Map out the structure, ment that promotes the roles of the people that shouldn’t have any,” think feedback you want to experience the progression different strengths and done as a team, make sure to initiative? approachable, under- ally happened. Revisit » Remaining Questions: Write large enough so that Explain each rule and mood: Switch to a new brain- Prototyping them may network, journey or best parts of your idea. are part of the situation of it as “They didn’t like respond to. 1 4 7 9 11 standable and actionable the notes you took right what questions would everyone can read your its purpose to set the » Warm-up brainstorm: storm question every lead to new inspiration. process of your idea. Try Have fun with it, and feel and uncover questions the couches so maybe the to everyone on the team. after your observation. you like to explore in your notes. Put all Post-its up on right tone for the activity. how might we find a fifteen to twenty minutes. different versions of your free to exaggerate shame- they might ask. space should offer a more Print out your photos next conversation? the wall on large sheets of You can find an over- needle in a haystack? Throw out some wild Challenge yourself to visualization. lessly. active feel.” Then explore and use them to illustrate paper. Use one sheet per view of brainstorming » Never could we ever: ideas yourself. Remind come up with at least what that means and find your stories. 3. Actively listen story, so you have an over- rules in the beginning brainstorm things you your team of the rules if three different versions of create a mock-up new ideas. our neighborhood community? While you are listening view of all your experi- of this section. could never do at your needed. Set a goal for how your idea to test multiple Build mock-ups of digital work in that fashion. Tell the story of each to each other, compare ences and the people you between steps. During the allow for individual work time. school. many ideas you want to perspectives will enable you aspects of the possible tools and websites person following these and contrast the things have met. » Get visual: ask everyone generate in total. solutions your team has with simple sketches of prompts (you may you have learned. Explore to draw his or her neigh- come up with. screens on paper. Paste have already used them areas where you find bor in a minute. Share. the paper mock-up to when capturing your different opinions and an actual computer first impressions): contradictions. Begin to screen or mobile phone look for recurring themes. when demonstrating it. rest of the year, you can draw to solve complex challenges. Sometimes the best progress 2. Prepare Research 5. Search for Meaning 8. Refine Ideas 10. Get Feedback 12. Build the Experience on what you learned during But teamwork isn’t always comes from solitary thinking, Most of the methods require How might we engage faculty in this time. easy. Team dynamics can planning and creating. Post-it Notes, large Post-it Discovery | 2.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit iNTerPreTATioN | 5.3 DT for Ed | Toolkit iDeATioN | 8.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit exPeriMeNT. | 10.5 DT for Ed | Toolkit evoLuTioN | 12.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit be as limiting as they are pads or a flipchart and felt step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type PREPARE SEARCH REFINE GET buILD step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type Prepare Research Reflective ~30-60 min Intermittent Search for Meaning Reflective ~45-90 min Continuous Refine Ideas Reflective ~45-60 mins Continuous Get Feedback Interaction ~30-60 min Continuous Build the Experience Hands-On ~30-45 min Intermittent RESEARCH FOR IDEAS FEEDbACk THE the hiring process? Identify Inspiration is the fuel for your ideas. Plan activities to learn from multiple Define Insights are a concise expression of what you have learned from your Do a So far, you have (hopefully) been developing your idea without giving Facilitate The most important ingredient in a feedback conversation is honesty: Identify In order to realize your concept, you will need various resources and capa- mEANING ExPERIENCE Sources of Insights Reality Feedback What’s empowering. Here’s how to markers. peoples’ perspectives and explore research and inspiration activities. much thought to the constraints you people may feel shy about telling you bilities, namely materials, money, time unfamiliar contexts. They are the unexpected information may face while attempting to realize what they really think of your idea if and people. Specify what exactly it will Inspiration that makes you sit up and pay atten- Check it. It makes sense to now do a real- Conversa- they know that you are very invested Needed take to make your idea come to life. tion. Insights allow you to see the ity check: look at what’s most impor- tions in it. Create a setting that encourages build a great team: Discovery world in a new way and are a catalyst tant about your idea and find ways to an open conversation. for new ideas. evolve and develop it further. other supplies that will be Team Team Team Team Team 2-3 People 2-3 People 2-4 People 2-4 People 2-4 People Start small: a team will work useful are: What it gets you 1. imagine interesting 3. Make a list of activities What it gets you 1. select what surprised 3. craft your insights What it gets you 1. Find out what your 2. List constraints Then revisit your list What it gets you 1. invite honesty and 3. stay neutral What it gets you 1. specify materials 3. estimate timeframes A research plan listing people to meet you want to do Insights that concisely you Experiment with the A first step toward bring- idea really is about Make a list of all the chal- of constraints. Brainstorm Constructive feedback on openness Present all concepts with An overview of what it Make a list of all the mate- Specify the amount of activities and people you Draw a map of all the Choose which activities communicate your Look across your buckets wording and structure to ing your idea to life. As a team, examine what’s lenges and barriers you how you might address your prototype. Introduce your prototype a neutral tone. Don’t be takes to realize your idea. rials you will need to build time that you’ll need to want to learn from. people involved in your will best help you learn research learnings. and themes and choose best communicate your at the core of your idea: are facing with your idea. some of these challenges. as a sketch that you are defensive—listen to all the your concept. Are these create your concept. Do topic. Think of character- and get inspired (find the information that you insights. Create short and What to keep in mind what gets you excited What are you missing? For example: how might What to keep in mind working on. Make it clear feedback and take notes What to keep in mind supplies available at your you need time for prepa- What to keep in mind istics that would make more information about What to keep in mind find most surprising, inter- memorable sentences A reality check might about it? What is the Who would oppose the we raise money to acquire Try to let participants that the development of both of the positive and Your needs may be larger school? Will you need to ration? Does anyone need Inspiration is found in them interesting to meet. each activity on the It can be a challenge to esting, or worth pursuing. that get to the point. Make seem discouraging, as most important value for idea? What will be most furniture for our common experience your concept, your idea is still in prog- negative comments. than the support you purchase any new assets? to be trained? Do you best if it consists of a core Adhesives places that excite you. As a team, choose who respective method pages): identify relevant pieces What have you learned sure your insights convey you may have to let go your audience? What is difficult to overcome? space? rather than just talking ress, and that you have can receive from your want to use an existing Dare to plan activities that you want to learn from. » Learn from individuals of information. Be patient that had not occurred to the sense of a new per- of some ideas. Focus the real need that this is Put the list up on the wall about it: let them interact not spent much time on 4. Adapt on the fly school. Don’t give up. Find 2. calculate funds meeting time differently? will invigorate the team, Plan how to get in contact » Learn from groups and try out various you before? What did you spective or possibility. on the possibility of actu- addressing? so it is visible to the team. 4. evolve your idea with a prototype in their building the prototype or Encourage participants ways to creatively make Money will always be even if you are not certain with them. » Learn from experts versions until you find find most inspiring? What ally building an idea in Discuss how you can own context, or integrate refining the details. to build on the idea, and your concept work within a scarce resource in an 4. identify people what exactly you may » Learn from peers a satisfying set. sparked the most ideas? 4. Get an outside the long term to keep up Capture your thoughts 3. Brainstorm new change your concept them into a roleplay. change your prototype those constraints. Can educational context. Don’t Create an overview of 2 5 8 10 12 learn from them. 2. Think of extremes observing peers perspective your collective energy. on Post-it Notes or a piece solutions based on your new ideas. 2. Provide multiple right away. Be ready to you involve an extra let this discourage you. people who can help Consider meeting people » Learn from peoples’ self- Not every insight is 2. reconnect the learnings Invite someone who is not of paper. For example, First, start from the list you How can you address the prototypes eliminate or change parts person to lessen the work- Think about creative realize your idea. What Remember that at this who represent “extremes”: documentation entirely new information. to your challenge part of your team to read Consider doing these if your idea is creating created in step one of this need differently? How can Prepare various ver- of the idea. load? What can you do ways to hold a fundraiser. capabilities are you look- group of two to five indi- Construction paper point, you are looking for people that are either » Immerse yourself in Often, you will find things Revisit the questions your insights and check check-ins on a regular a teachers’ lounge with method, describing the you work around the con- sions of your prototype with existing materials? Look into applying for a ing for? Who is invested inspiration, not validation. completely familiar with context that you knew about that you started out with: whether they resonate basis as you move for- large couches, the real core values of your idea. straints you are facing? to encourage people to grant. Consider opportu- in supporting the con- Spend more time with and involved in your topic, » Seek inspiration in new before, but your research how do your findings with an outside audience. ward with idea develop- value is in allowing teach- Think up other possibili- compare and contrast. Reflect on how your nities to tap into existing cept? Do you need to find a select group of people or don’t have anything places may have given you a relate to your challenge? ment. ers to relax. ties that might satisfy the 5. Archive ideas idea will be sustained budgets. Don’t forget to someone to champion the rather than trying to meet to do with it. Extreme new perspective. Don’t Narrow down the infor- needs your idea responds Let go of ideas that feel too over time. Can it scale? explore how to realize idea? Capture your needs many. It will likely help participants will help you be shy about retelling mation to those insights to. Consider facilitating a difficult to create, or that Will it live on without your idea without any on Post-its. Sort them and you learn more. understand unarticulated these stories. that are relevant and quick brainstorm to come you are not excited about. your involvement? Build money as a brainstorm identify which capabili- behaviors, desires, and find new clusters. Be pre- up with more ideas. Keep your Post-its and a foundation for longer- challenge. ties you have inside your viduals. The smaller size will Foam core boards needs of the rest of the In the process of identify- pared to let go of details notes so you can revisit term impact. school, and which you‘ll population that they feel ing insights, you will prob- that are less important. For example: how them later. have to find externally. or express more power- ably come up with a lot Try to limit your insights might we create spaces Think about leveraging fully than others. of ideas. Create an “idea to the three to five most for teachers to unwind the larger network and parking lot” and revisit important. between classes? including parents, alumni them later on. and/or neighbors. make it easier to coordinate Markers 3. Gather Inspiration 6. Frame Opportunities schedules and make deci- Scissors Discovery | 3.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit iNTerPreTATioN | 6.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit GATHER INSPIRATION DT for Ed | Toolkit FRAmE OPPORTuNITIES DT for Ed | Toolkit sions. Invite others to join for Digital Cameras Video cameras step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type brainstorms, give feedback Gather Inspiration Interaction ~1-2 hours Continuous Frame Opportunities Reflective ~45-90 min Continuous Learn Spending time with people on their own allows you to deeply engage with Make Insights only become valuable when you can act on them as inspiring From Insights or help you get unstuck when and learn from them. Guide the con- opportunities. Turn them into brain- versation to gain a rich understanding storm questions, the springboard for Individuals of their thoughts and behaviors. Actionable your ideas. it’s most useful. Team Team 2-3 People 2-3 People What it gets you 1. create a trusted 3. capture your immedi- What it gets you 1. Develop “how might 2. choose brainstorm How might we...? An in-depth insight into atmosphere ate observations Brainstorm questions that For example: we” statements questions individuals’ needs and Start the conversation on Take lots of quick notes respond to the insights Create generative Select three to five of motivations. a casual note. Talk about in the voice of the par- you found. “How might we create a questions around your these questions for your a subject that is unrelated ticipants. Write down teachers’ lounge with insights. Start each state- brainstorm session. Trust What to keep in mind to your research first to interesting quotes. Do not What to keep in mind large couches?” implies ment with “How might your gut feeling: choose Field research activities make the participant feel worry about interpreting Avoid brainstorm ques- the solution is a room we...?” or “What if…?” those questions that feel are an opportunity to comfortable. Be consider- them yet. Try to capture tions that already imply with large couches. as an invitation for exciting and help you 3 6 take a new perspective. ate of the space you are in your observations in the a solution. Ask yourself: input, suggestions and think of ideas right away. Treat your conversation and make sure you have moment. “Why do we want to do “Why do we want to do exploration. Generate Also, select the questions partner as an expert. Try the appropriate level of that?” This will help you that?” surfaces the actual multiple questions for that are most important to not to make participants privacy. 4. Get continuous reframe your question need of a space for teach- every insight. Write address, even if they feel feel that you are more feedback more broadly. ers to be able to wind them in plain language, difficult to solve for. knowledgeable than they 2. Pay attention to the Consider making one or down in between classes. simple and concise. are, particularly when environment some of your research The brainstorm question you are speaking with Try to meet in the par- participants members of would then be: children. ticipant’s context—in their your team to continuously classroom, home, office or get their feedback and “How might we create Often, interviews will take workplace. During the ideas. a space for teachers to an unexpected turn and conversation, keep your unwind between classes?” you will learn something eyes open for what’s you did not expect to hear. around. Ask about objects This expands possible Go with the flow and let or spaces you find inter- solutions beyond the idea your participant lead the esting, and try to get a of a room with couches. conversation. tour of the environment. Look for contradictions. What people say and what they actually do is often not the same thing.7 8 9 10 11 DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DEFINE PREPARE GATHER TELL search THE RESEARCH INSPIRATION STORIES for CHALLENGE meaning Interpre- 1 2 3 tation 4 5 DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit FRAmE GENERATE REFINE mAkE OPPORTuNITIES IDEAS IDEAS PROTOTyPES Experimen- 6 7 8 9 Ideation tation DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Toolkit DT for Ed | Guide | p. 82 Team Thank YOu Riverdale Country School Yvette Allen GET EvALuATE buILD Phase (Circle one) (Circle one) (Shade in) (Circle one) Karen Fierst Lakmini Besbroda FEEDbACk LEARNINGS THE Step Mode Time Needed Time Type Patrick Murray Dominic Randolph David Bill Neal Bluel ExPERIENCE Michael Schurr Leyla Bravo-Willey Tom Brunzell IDeO Maria-Teresa Design (Method title) (Overview) Annette Diefenthaler Capelle-Burny Adam Geremia Rebtecca Cohen Team Ellen Sitkin Frank Corcoran Sarah Soffer Rich Crandall Sandy Speicher Tyshawn Davis Jackie Steck Design4Change Students COnTRIbuTORS Laura Desmond Ellen Greengrass David Hayes This toolkit is the Ryan Jacoby Mark Hostetter result of a close collaboration between Ben Lesch Bob Hughes Riverdale Country Sarah Lidgus IN-Tech Academy MS/HS 368 School and IDEO from February-April 2011. Tatyana Mamut Carmen James (Circle number) Amanda Rebstock Danny LaChance Riverdale Country Emily Sheehan David Levin School is an indepen- dent Pre-K through Maggie Siena Jane Lisman Katz Team Grade 12 school Dan Wandrey KIPP Infinity Faculty in New York City. Mary Ludemann www.riverdale.edu Don Ostrow P.S.150 IDEO (pronounced Kris Randolph “eye-dee-oh”) is an award-winning Riverdale Country School Where it gets you (Instructions) global design firm Teachers and Students that takes a human- Adam Royalty centered approach to helping organiza- Paul Rozenfeld tions in the public Natasha Schmemann and private sectors Christina Seda innovate and grow. What to keep in mind Sandy Shaller www.ideo.com Jed Silverstein 10 11 12 Aparajita Sohoni Stanford d.school, Evolution k-12 lab
  • DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 3 Are you curious to explore There is a reason for the Design Thinking and try it sequence—each step of the out yourself? This document process builds on the other. explains how to do so. And often it makes a lot of sense to follow it in a linear As you start to experience way. But don’t feel restricted the design process, many by that: only you know how parts of it will feel familiar to to best use this toolkit. UseExplore you: they are based on capa- bilities you have and use in your daily work. Sometimes, it along with other meth- odologies and theories you find useful to develop ideas.This Toolkit however, you will feel chal- lenged and get stuck. And it’s easy to lose sight of your Adapt it, annotate it, cut it up, reconstruct it and make it your own. Add new methods overall goal once you have to your toolkit as you see fit. begun to explore. All that is perfectly normal. Make sure So, plow in. have fun with it. you regularly take a step Discover what happens to back and reconsider where your practice as an educa- you are. Discuss the chal- tor as you begin to think and lenges you have run into, and work like a designer. think about these moments as valuable learning oppor- tunities. Then, keep looking Build your own ahead: optimism is essential method. in order to get to new ideas. DT for Ed | Toolkit Phase (Circle one) (Circle one) (Shade in) (Circle one) Step Mode Time Needed Time Type (Method title) (Overview) (Circle number) Team Where it gets you (Instructions) What to keep in mindPrototype of amethod duringthe developmentof the toolkit.
  • DT for Ed | Toolkit | p. 4 This toolkit guides you The methods are the core through the design process piece of this toolkit: they in five phases and twelve offer the actual instructions steps. every phase has a that help you put Design distinct purpose and feel to Thinking to action. each it. That’s why you find a brief method includes concise introduction to each one of explanations, useful sugges- them, and an outline of which tions and tips to make it work.The Design steps to take and when.ProcessPhASeS dIsCOvEry IntErprEtatIOn IdEatIOn ExpErImEntatIOn EvOlutIOnI have a challenge. I learned something. I see an opportunity. I have an idea. I tried something new.How do I approach it? How do I interpret it? What do I create? How do I build it? How do I evolve it?STePS1. define the Challenge 4. tell stories 7. Generate Ideas 9. make prototypes 11. Evaluate learnings2. prepare research 5. search for meaning 8. refine Ideas 10. Get Feedback 12. Build the Experience3. Gather Inspiration 6. Frame OpportunitiesMeThODS Discovery | 1.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit iNTerPreTATioN | 4.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit iDeATioN | 7.2 DT for Ed | Toolkit exPeriMeNT. | 9.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit evoLuTioN | 12.1 DT for Ed | Toolkit step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type step Mode Time Needed Time Type Define Challenge Reflective ~1-2 hours Continuous Tell Stories Hands-On ~30-60 min Continuous Generate Ideas Hands-on ~45-60 mins Continuous Make Prototypes Hands-On ~45-90 min Intermittent Build the Experience Hands-On ~30-45 min Intermittent Understand A clearly defined challenge will guide your questions and help you stay on Share Share what you learned from your research as stories, not just general Facilitate Brainstorming is a great activity to generate fresh thoughts and new Create a Prototypes enable you to share your idea with other people and discuss Identify In order to realize your concept, you will need various resources and capa- the track throughout the process. Spend time with your team to create a com- Inspiring statements. This will create common knowledge that your team can use to Brain- energy. Create a safe and positive atmosphere for your brainstorm so Prototype how to further refine it. You can proto- type just about anything. Choose