John Seeley Brown's deck changing how we think about and lead change
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John Seeley Brown's deck changing how we think about and lead change

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John Seely Brown warns us about the competency trap—because we are experts in what we know, when we confront problems, we do more of what we know how to do, rather than look to the larger ...

John Seely Brown warns us about the competency trap—because we are experts in what we know, when we confront problems, we do more of what we know how to do, rather than look to the larger context.

He challengs us to design evocative experiences beyond the cognitive: narratives, not logic, reign supreme.

He exhorted us to encourage emergent practices around authorized ones.

And he suggests that we do this in a certain rhythm that balances the dramatic with the systematic, by conceiving of a vision that is compelling, strategically ambiguous, positive, and aspirational.

Source: http://www.arl.org/about/arl-strategic-thinking-and-design

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  • Terrific presentation. I thoroughly enjoyed it. It has pizzazz. Talking about something as stressful as change shouldn't be this much fun, should it? Highly recommend watching this presentation
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  • Fantastic presentation, Fred, as it visually shows the disruption we encounter by the rapidity of change. Surely, the presentation opens new windows of looking at change. This is a change from the way we discuss change.
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John Seeley Brown's deck changing how we think about and lead change John Seeley Brown's deck changing how we think about and lead change Presentation Transcript

  • Changing How We Think About and Lead Change 20th C. Push Economy => 21st C. Pull Economy John Seely Brown Visiting Scholar University of Southern California ARL Fall Forum, October 12, 2012
  • Our Context
  • 18th, 19th, 20th C infrastructure 50 yrs The era(s) of relative stability Skills lasted a lifetime Career paths were clear S-curve stable over decades. Institutional architectures lasted for ever. S-curve
  • then The Big Shift Happened
  • 21st C infrastructure: no stability in sight driven by continual exponential advances in computation 18th, 19th, 20th C infrastructure 50 yrs S-curve S-curve stable over decades.
  • In a world of increasingly rapid change, the half life of a given stock or skill is constantly shrinking. Stocks =====> Flows protecting/delivering authoritative knowledge assets canons/genres relatively fixed participating in knowledge flows genres fluid: transmedia, participatory culture world building
  • An epistemological shift “Knowledge is no longer that which is contained in space, but that which passes through it, like a series of vectors, each having direction and duration yet without precise location or limit. Carla Hesse: In the future, it seems, there will be no fixed canons of texts and no fixed epistemological boundaries between disciplines, only paths of inquiry, modes of integration, and moments of encounter.”
  • A Belief The challenges we face are both fundamental and substantial. We have moved from an era of equilibrium to a new normalan era of constant dis-equilibrium. Our ways of working, ways of creating value & ways of innovating must be reframed.
  • But we have gone thru dis-continuties before. Yeah but not easily. Why is change so hard and will this time be even harder.. Are we just too set in our ways, our mindsets??
  • The Competency Trap works against change! to produce a product family to see new patterns time but what blocks one from seeing new patterns?
  • An Example of a Competency Trap Glenalvon - 1880s Clipper Ships
  • France ll
  • Preussen
  • Thomas W. Lawson Competency traps Reigns Supreme
  • The Great Challenge • changing { one’s own an institution’s } beliefs brick wall to create action
  • Egads, I am not an expert on change. I just stumble along. Bear with me. First some personal examples and then some more general principles.
  • Designing Evocative Experiences - beyond the cognitive • engagement • participation • emotion • gut What! … I thought logic reigned supreme. No, no, narratives do.
  • When User Hits Machine – changing the corporate Xerox mindset listening to the dialogue Never underestimate the power of a narrative
  • Fine – jsb but how did you bring about systemic change inside your own organization? And systemic change was needed and will always be needed.
  • Skills, Social Practices & Needed Services evolve around new technologies 18th, 19th, 20th C infrastructure 21st C infrastructure 50 yrs S-curve S-curve rapid set of punctuated moves
  • Getting PARC researchers to embrace change. But I am my specialty, I can’t change.
  • What??? Don’t you know we are the best!! Why do WE need to change?
  • Cool – but how do you know you are still the best? And can’t you be even better??
  • some small steps – but no brilliant moves i) Became a meta research project – what would constitute truly legitimate measures of value created. ii) Started a year long process of key folks in the lab visiting labs that were doing new breakout research (nano-machines, in particular) iii) Asked all researchers giving talks to report back on what they personally learned. iv) Started an ambitious 50 person summer intern program where part of their job was to needle us our ‘old’ tools and methods.
  • some small steps – but no brilliant moves i) Became a meta research project – what would constitute truly legitimate measures of value created. ii) Started a year long process of key folks in the lab visiting labs that were doing new breakout research (nano-machines, in particular) iii) Asked all researchers giving talks to report back on what they personally learned. iv) Started an ambitious 50 person summer intern program where part of their job was to needle us our ‘old’ tools and methods.
  • some small steps – but no brilliant moves i) Became a meta research project – what would constitute truly legitimate measures of value created. ii) Started a year long process of key folks in the lab visiting labs that were doing new breakout research (nano-machines, in particular) iii) Asked all researchers giving talks to report back on what they personally learned. iv) Started an ambitious 50 person summer intern program where part of their job was to needle us our ‘old’ tools and methods.
  • some small steps – but no brilliant moves i) Became a meta research project – what would constitute truly legitimate measures of value created. ii) Started a year long process of key folks in the lab visiting labs that were doing new breakout research (nano-machines, in particular) iii) Asked all researchers giving talks to report back on what they personally learned. iv) Started an ambitious 50 person summer intern program where part of their job was to needle us our ‘old’ tools and methods.
  • But how do you get folks from different disciplines and different locations to work toward each other toward new ways of working.
  • Authorized and Emergent Practices Authorized Emergent the structure around the work of organizations the structure within the work of organizations Traditional IT supports the authorized Social software supports the emergent The social fabric supports knowledge sharing & meaning
  • Warning – the following will seem simple and perhaps weird.
  • A wired coffee pot
  • Fostering and capturing brainstorming Copying from wall to web
  • Connecting the commons with wide band video over the internet nyc San Francisco
  • Jack Hidary “How often do you get out of your comfort zone?” And how can you do this effectively?
  • Breaking out of Epistemic Silos: exploring the white space in truly socio-technical, multi-disciplinary ways
  • PAIR: PARC ARTIST IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM Rich Gold Technologies of Imagination Pairing Artists and Scientists, One on One, Using Technology as a Common Language.
  • The Big Picture
  • The Rhythm of Change Quy Nguyen Huy & Henry Mintzberg “change has to be managed with a profound appreciation of stability”
  • Change 1.0
  • “Because dramatic change alone can be just drama, systematic change by itself can be deadening, and organic change without the other two can be chaotic, they must be sequenced and paced over time, creating a rhythm of change. “
  • The Bigger Picture
  • Change 2.0
  • A Guiding Example 20th Century Focus: State Craft 21st Century Need: State Craft meets Street Craft Or, perhaps, rethinking of the academy.
  • MINORITY REPORT
  • VISION VISION IS ABOUT SIGHT, PERCEPTION, AND THE IMAGINATION
  • VISION IT IS ABOUT WORLD BUILDING (THE FULL CONTEXT)
  • VISION Change 2.0 META-NARRATIVE MICRO-NARRATIVES AP-J
  • VISION AND THE ROLE OF META-NARRATIVE COMPELLING STRATEGICALLY AMBIGUOUS POSITIVE + ASPIRATIONAL A key take away.
  • VISION Change 2.0 META-NARRATIVE MECHANISMS MICRO-NARRATIVES AP-J
  • VISION Change 2.0 META-NARRATIVE social networks MECHANISMS MICRO-NARRATIVES AP-J
  • Change 2.0 Meta-NARRATIVE world building MECHANISMS Transmedia MICRO-NARRATIVES AP-J
  • Change 2.0 Meta-NARRATIVE world building Harry Potter social networks Structural holes MECHANISMS Transmedia World Without Oil (ARG) MICRO-NARRATIVES AP-J
  • Thank You By Ann Pendleton-Jullian John Seely Brown Change 2.0 sketches by Ann Pendleton- Jullian; other sketches by Susan Haviland
  • Thank You