Engine service design toolbox

2,759 views

Published on

Via G Gill
Searching the web for a service design toolbox this document by Engine, a UK based service design consultancy located in London. The document outlines their Service Design Process alongside some methods for service design.
Beside the document, their website also features a list of methods and the process description, which I found quite interesting

Published in: Business
0 Comments
14 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,759
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
53
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
158
Comments
0
Likes
14
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Engine service design toolbox

  1. 1. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Prepared by Lara Penin, December 1st 2008    Our
process
      Orientate and Discover Each client project has a slightly different service focus, for example, improving  After Planning, the first phases for us are Orientate axnd Discover. Orientation the quality of the customer experience by working with front line staff, re‐ is about getting to know the organisation we’re working with, understanding designing the customer journey, developing a service vision or innovating new  their business model and the nature of the market in which they operate. We customer propositions.  get to ask all sorts of naive questions of very senior managers. We set up and Projects unfold in three general phases. Identify, Build and Measure. The  run workshops using a variety of techniques to orientate ourselves and to allow phases break down a little further ‐ we’ve outlined this below in the diagram  a project team to begin to share their views about the context that has been and stage breakdown.   identified.   During Discover we use a number of techniques to understand how things are  working from the perspective of those who use the organisation’s services ‐ and  those that provide them.  These first two steps make up the Identify phase and provide us with an  understanding of what success might look like as well as list of key issues and  challenges we’ll be looking to address.    Generate  Next there’s the start of the Build phase with a systematic Generation step in  which we conceptualise and explore visually many responses to the challenge.  This happens at Engine, with our clients and often with their customers  through the design of workshops that allow people to design their own services  (a great route to customer insight as well as to out‐of‐the‐blue service  innovation).    Synthesise and Model   Prototyping is critical in reducing risk and getting the best results and this  applies equally whether designing strategy, propositions or the touchpoints of  a customer experience. So the next phase in Build is to model and test our ideas.  As we’re designers and not management consultants this is a very visual and  creative phase in which we can bring new propositions or strategic futures to  life in ways that allow them to be refined collaboratively with our client team or  with customers.  Ideas or propositions are refined and evaluated iteratively which happens in  different ways depending on the client and the sector. For example, we worked  directly with analysts at Norwich Union to ensure that the ideas we generated  for insurance services were more than just blue sky but meet the commercial  requirements of the insurer.  A point is reached at which we agree that we’ve    got what we need. This is sometimes as far as our client needs to go before Engine design process  pitching a new proposition into their organisation.     
  2. 2. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Specify We work with many clients to specify services in detail. As a multidisciplinary team we’re as comfortable specifying physical service environments ‐ as we’ve done with Virgin Atlantic at Heathrow ‐ as we are specifying financial or on‐line services. Services are specified through a number of representations beyond written market concept documents. Our expertise is in describing the near‐future experiences of a service and in detailing their content and functionality through scenarios maps, mock‐ups, story‐boards and so on.  Measure (with empathy) Being able to measure efficiency and effectiveness ‐ but also desirability, usefulness and usability of services is critical to getting the feedback needed to support on‐going improvement. This step connects the start of the process with the end. In other words, to establish what customers and providers value, to design services that create this value and to be able to measure the ability to create it and inform further improvement.  Produce Working with our clients as they move towards service production means the designing and development of the touchpoints of that service. We design websites, service interiors, products and communications. We also support the training of front‐line workers with the design of workshops and tools to help staff evaluate the experiences that they are delivering to customers.  Transfer and transformation One big advantage of our approach cited in client testimonials over and over again is that often as a result of our work with them they are able to adopt new ways of working. Design‐led methodologies are very accessible and therefore respond to an organisation’s objective to work more creatively and collaboratively. We’re strong on both creativity and process.     1.
Identify
 2.
Build
 3.
Measure
 Orientate  Discover  Generate               Synthesise  Model  Specify  Produce  Measure  
  3. 3. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Service
Blueprint
       What  When to use it A Service Blueprint can help you to simply specify a service. Additionally it can  Service Blueprints are invaluable in the development of new services. As well help build teams and spot problems early on. While conventional blueprints are  as helping service providers to coordinate people and resources across time, used to map space, Service Blueprints are generally about mapping time. The  they are also useful as a participatory project planning and management tool. participatory nature of the blueprinting process is a great way to build teams  Service Blueprints can form a shared focus for the various stakeholders and share expertise.  responsible for the development and delivery of a new service, and   collaboratively developing or reviewing a Service Blueprint in a workshop  setting can help bring people on board.  Equally, Service Blueprints can also be used as a way to examine what is and  isn’t working in an existing service.  We’ve used service blueprinting with  clients such as NESTA, UCE and Nokia.       A service blueprint under development  What you get Service blueprints are living, flexible documents, normally produced collaboratively with as many stakeholders as possible. Traditional blueprints are used to help designers work with manufacturers, architects with builders ‐ in this sense they are about realising the design, and they are produced towards the end of the creative process. Service Blueprints on the other hand are used during the design process, often very early on, to help specify the various components of a service.                A Service Blueprint we produced for NESTA   
  4. 4. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Distributed
Scenario
Brainstorm
 What it is A Distributed Scenario Brainstorm (DSB) is designed to generate creative opportunities for service innovation. This tool is particularly helpful to develop new ideas for services that are situation‐specific, such as roadside recovery or holiday packages. These services are usually experienced at different moments and locations and as a result the experiences customers have are usually very dynamic, complex and subjective. Coming up with innovative ideas for every possible situation and every possible customer can be extremely challenging. That’s when the DSB tool can help. During a DSB session participants use a set of cards depicting a wide range of service moments and personas. By randomly picking and combining different personas and service moments, we can focus on specific issues to generate lots of ideas. A typical brainstorming session involves several rounds of mini‐brainstorms around a set of moments and personas. Once participants come up with a good number of ideas (usually ten to fifteen), they select a new set of cards and start a new discussion. This helps to keep the creative momentum while exploring different scenarios within a service.  What you get We always end up with a big pile of ideas! We also like to have multidisciplinary groups with people from different areas and backgrounds. We usually have sessions with a mix of service designers, end users and clients. This helps to increase the richness of the ideas and to get buy in from team members ‐ after all, they came up with the ideas themselves.     Writing down the ideas    When you use it  As a divergent thinking tool, the DSB generates ideas in a rather unstructured  way. For this reason, we usually use a DSB during the Discover and Generate  phases of a project, where the main objective is to challenge existing paradigms  and explore new ideas.    
  5. 5. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/   • Places   Personas
 • Personality   • Consumerism    What  When building our characters we are mindful that there should be a correct Personas are visual and anecdotal profiles. They may be based on ‘real people’  balance between contextual insight and holistic insight, concerning emotional, from research or they may have been ‘made‐up’ in a brainstorm session. By  qualitative and lifestyle issues. Often, too much is made of the archetypes profile we mean information about the person that is illustrative and useful to  personality. the project ‐ it should identify the key characteristics of the person. Posing  During workshops we like to use empathetic personas as a warm‐up activity. questions and answering them as the persona character is often helpful to build  This involves participants finishing a persona that has already been half up a character ‐ quirky or unusual questions are often more insightful.  developed ‐ in hope that the participant will empathize with the character as  they have played a part in creating it.      Filling in a persona board    What you get  A persona is simply an image of a person with tailored information about their  lifestyle, behaviour and attitude. A creative approach should be taken to    designing the imagery, language, look and feel of a persona so it is presented in A group of personas  a visually compelling and digestible format. Multiple personas will be based on   the same information model for coherency and comparison. It can be useful to build an information model that the personas should   describe ‐ this is useful for really detailed personas and ensures all relevant  When to use it areas have been covered. Areas to build information for persona’s around  Personas can be used for a number of different reasons during different stages include:  of the design process. For example to; • People    • act as stimulus to fuel idea generation  • a useful tool to refer to and consider • Behaviours and attitudes    during the design process  • aid product and proposition development  • • Skills    archetypically represent each segment of an organizations market • Goals    In service design personas are often followed by building customer journeys ‐ • Time    this determines how a particular person experiences a service.   
  6. 6. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Customer
Journey
mapping
       What  The map is humanised with personal insights, anecdotes and photos, using the Journey mapping is a method of visually representing the actual and everyday  users language, their successes and even failures as a very user‐centred user experience of a service. Mapping journeys is one of the simplest and most  visualisation of the customer journey. useful approaches to understand services, gaps in service, and to identify and   design opportunities for improvement and innovation. The mapping, representation and analysis of a journey ‐an experience over time‐ has many functions and can be applied to service design and innovation at various stages.         When to use it  Engine uses customer journey mapping and the representation and analysis of  journeys in our work in a number of ways:  • As a framework for modelling and redesigning services and interactions.    • To reveal the real and informal touchpoints of a service.    • In order to identify and design‐out non‐value adding steps and duplications of  effort etc.    • To design‐in better process interfaces with the right people, resources and  organisations    • To unlock opportunities for people to help themselves when appropriate.    • As an approachable user‐engagement technique that helps people to structure  their thinking about their experiences.    • An insight tool for managers and as a counterpoint to the familiar operational    process maps that they use.     • An audit tool from which user experience metrics (MyMetrics) can be What you get  developed.   The customer journey map will plot touch points, service interactions and  • A planning and training solution as part of service production (or delivery) . gestures of users having experienced a service. The method helps us     understand the intentional and unintentional aspects of the customer journey.   Examples    Engine has used customer journey mapping in a variety of projects. For another  example see our Nesta case study.      
  7. 7. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/       Path
To
Participation
   When to use it   A well designed service will have considered all paths to participation. The path What is it?  to participation mapping process can help with the design of customer The path to participation is a diagram or sketch of a participation framework  engagement (how do we attract these customers?) and retention (how do we that service interactions can be mapped on. Normally it takes the form of a  keep them interested?). series of moments drawn as a process.  It can be visualised on different levels;  The model is generally used during early generative phases of projects to help from an operational point of view and as a customer journey.  the team get a better understanding of an existing service, and to make sure  they have considered all the points where the service comes into contact with  the user.   What you get The activity itself of mapping the path to participation is the most valuable output of this method, although the resulting diagram can be used at various stages of a service design project to inspire and check ideas.   
  8. 8. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Culture
hunt
 What it is The culture hunt is an immersion method in which a designer spends an intensive period of time in a pre‐selected group of locations. The aim is to be inspired and gain a deeper understanding of the workings of the particular place of study. Quantity is as important as quality when undertaking a culture hunt.  Activities in the locations may involve observations, ad‐hoc interviews, photography and absorbing the atmosphere through taking notes. The trick is to keep the pace up and select stimulating environments.  What you get The treasure is a collection of observations and insights that can help stimulate ideas. Its best to hunt with two or three others for maximum material.                        Culture hunt image capture  When to use it When seeking knowledge and inspiration on a topic or environment, usually at early stages of the project to stimulate fresh thinking. ItҒs a high energy, playful and explorative method.   
  9. 9. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Participant
journals
       What they are  What you get Service design relies heavily on establishing the true needs and practices of  The journals are returned full of information and knowledge from the both service users and providers. One means of capturing rich, accurate  participants. Simply put, you get what you’ve asked for. The structure or brief information during a service design project is to equip users and providers with  originally set determines how participants respond ‐ and therefore the nature tools called participant probes. These help capture participants’ activities,  of the data. thoughts and feelings. Journals are an effective and easy to use form of  Presenting information from the journals to project stakeholders with photos participant probe.  taken by participants helps to build a convincing story. The format of journals   allows both easy skimming, and deeper interpretation.    When to use them  Journals are most useful when you need a deep, detailed understanding of the  thoughts, feelings or activities of users and other stakeholders. They are used  effectively in advance of discovery workshops. Participant journals are usually  a good compliment to other design research techniques such as contextual  interviews.      Journals are usually sent to participants with a specific brief on how and when they should be used. Their structure can vary from loose to specific; some are intended to capture a number of experiences over a longer period, while others focus on specific tasks. The very presence of a journal acts as a physical motivator to participants to record their thoughts on a regular basis. A journal’s information design has a huge impact on how it is used. Exercises that trigger or reveal emotions ‐ both pleasant and unpleasant ‐ can provide useful insight on a variety of experiences over time. Journals must be usable, with any page layout being well considered.  Participant journals are often accompanied with disposable cameras. Images taken help tell the story through the participants’ eyes.    
  10. 10. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Contextual
Interview
                                              What it is     When to use it    A contextual interview is spending time with a person in their territory often in  Ethnographic work is used to reveal subjective realities of how people their home, social place or workspace combining loosely structured interviews  experience different aspects of their lives, as opposed to market research, and observations.   This technique stems from ethnography in which  which is often conducted to verify and validate. ethnographers spend months or even years living and observing people in  It is usually used in the early stages of a project. Often in service design the different cultures. In the commercial context ethnographic work has time  stories, observations and insights can be fed into a workshop as great stimulus limitations therefore it is usually restricted to half a day or a few days.  for conversation and picking apart needs, problems and opportunities for Ethnographers importantly remind their participant to behave as naturally as  innovation.   It can also be used to bring to life the reality of a strategy by possible; to do the things they would normally do with the people they would  understanding it from the end users perspective. normally do them with and encourage them not to change their behaviour or   put on a show for the researcher. The researcher has the sensitive challenge of conducting an interview without it seeming to be an interview, but rather a chat where questions and answers are exchanged in both directions. The best  
way to do this is to avoid taking notes (occasionally skirting off to the toilet to write them down before you forget!).  
Interviews are often conducted with several different types of people for a particular project in order to achieve a broad array of insights. Finding the right people in a short space of time can be difficult. Cash based incentives are the best way to secure the right participants.   The beauty of good ethnographic work is in understanding the reality of people and not working on assumptions.      What you get    Contextual interviews can help to uncover the unknown unknowns. Spending time with a participant reveals a deep understanding of their behaviour, needs, problems, desire and motivations. The output of an interview is rich and meaningful observations and insights that build a story on the participant. The stories can be supported and emphasised by images and video clips.   
  11. 11. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Graphic
Facilitation
               What it is Graphic facilitation is a technique for visualizing or scribbling information. During a group brainstorming or workshop session on any subject matter the graphic facilitator is dedicated to capturing the discussion or presentation in a visual format.   The format of capturing is usually sketching on a flipchart or someplace that everyone can see it. This technique helps to stimulate left‐brain thinking ‐ the visual part of the brain. It keeps people’s interest, as there’s always something exciting to look at. It’s visual and it’s fun.   This technique is particularly good for obtaining an overall sense of meeting and having something tangible to deliver to project stakeholders. Capturing what people say in images can beat the overload of post‐its often used to take notes.  What you get During the session you get a visual that [participants can respond to during the session.  Afterworlds you are left with an instant visual summary to show the project stakeholders. This can help you save time as there is less synthesis after a session  When to use it Use it to capture a visual summary of any group session. However this technique doesn’t capture the detail and shouldn’t be used to replace minute taking or digital recording so may not be appropriate in a high level strategic meeting.    
  12. 12. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Co‐creation
       What it is  What you get Co‐creation is at the heart of what we do. We want to design with users in order  Users gain a sense of ownership of the project and its outcomes, and may even to see beyond insights and opinions on a situation, an existing design or a  become champions of the project and process within their organisation or proposed solution, and help people discover their own ideas on how to tackle a  group. Co‐creative processes are more easily embedded into an organisation’s problem or make the most of an opportunity.  workings, whether it be a community, a government department or an Co‐creation is often run in workshops, but can just as easily be done using  international company. blogs, diaries and rapid prototyping. We may guide the discussion with  Such projects are more sustainable because users gain the capacity to evolve questions, provocations and tools, but we understand that the users we are  the design in the future, having experienced why design decisions have been working with are the real experts on themselves. Fundamentally, we’re asking  made. This, coupled with appropriate tools can even help nurture a culture of our users ‘what can be done about it?’  innovation and change within an organisation.     When to use it  Co‐creation is a powerful tool in many situations, but in particular we have  found it to be successful in bringing together the needs and ideas of different  types of users within an organisation. We’ve designed schools with students,  teachers and local community members and worked with different department  heads, ‘front line’ workers and customers when designing service propositions  and how they will be delivered. It’s also a useful tool to get people ‘on board’  and help spread the word about the project.          
  13. 13. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Filming
       What it is  When to use it  Filming can add colour and depth to research, or provide us with insights and   Filming can record lots of ideas very quickly, condense long sequences of time opinions we may not have otherwise gleaned. It records the ideas, actions and  and events into just a few minutes, and good editing and interview technique feelings of stakeholders, often with great honesty.  can produce statements and opinions which can engage project stakeholders. Filming can be deployed in a range of scenarios for a range of purposes. From a  Filming often requires sensitivity in how it is conducted in order to create an user’s diary recorded on their mobile phone to a professional setup for  environment where the camera isn’t obtrusive and people can speak and act as interviews, the key is to find the right specific methods to get what you want.  freely and naturally as possible. Who does the filming, where, how, with what and how it may be edited  Organisation is vital ‐ everything in front of the camera, rehearsed or not, is together for your audiences should all be considered before pressing Record.    live. Being flexible and prepared makes sure that even the unexpected parts are   recorded. Even sending users out with cameras to film what they want can What you get  benefit from some guidelines.  You get out what you put in ‐ everything has an impact on the way people will   react and the things people will do and say in front of a camera. The project often informs the decision to choose filming ‐ and the options below may make your film more engaging, exciting and ‘real’ with footage of real customers, users, staff and participants talking about their experiences. Service prototyping  Role play  Interviews  Video diaries  Ethnographic research  Presentations  Time lapse footage  A user’s point of view          
  14. 14. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Conjoint
analysis
       What it is  When to use it Conjoint analysis is a form of quantitative research offering powerful insight  An obvious prerequisite is that the qualities you’d like to test (the aspects and into customer preferences, from a simple set of questions.  components of your service) must be known. Towards the beginning of a Participants (usually potential customers or service users) are asked to choose  project (in the identify phase), conjoint analysis can be used to highlight areas between a couple of packages ‐ or in our case, service variants. This process is  in need of the most creative focus. repeated several times with different variants.  The technique is also useful later in a project when ideas have started to gel ‐ The participants’ choices are fed through a computer, for a rich picture of  during the build phase. It can validate the potential popularity of a service preferences in terms of the service’s underlying qualities (for example time of  before production, shedding light on features to keep or reject, or how best to day, cost, and speed). The results are more accurate than if the participant had  bundle them.  ranked the qualities separately (without thinking of them in the context of  Lastly, conjoint analysis can help pinpoint which aspects of a service to complete services). The ideal service mix is magically revealed, even though it  emphasise in terms of marketing, and at what price point to launch the service. probably won’t have been one that the participant actually saw and ranked.    What you get Conjoint analysis ranks people’s preferences within each quality (for example, for the quality “time of day”, morning may be preferred to afternoon). But it also reveals the relative importance of the qualities themselves ‐ for example, time of day may play a lesser role in customers’ decision‐making processes than speed.     Yellow, not red. Cheap, not expensive. But most importantly, large, not small.  It’s also possible to produce data showing where the biggest changes in sensitivity are, for a given quality. For example, people might object more to a jump from low to medium price, than from medium to high.        
  15. 15. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Storyboarding
                                              What it is   Storyboarding is a narrative technique adopted from the film industry and  If you’re using storyboards to explore ideas and check your thinking you’ll have adapted to suit the needs of designers interested in ways to communicate the  a series of more ‘sketchy’ moments ‐ its often best to draw these on postcards various features of a service design. Storyboarding can be used to test and  so you can re‐order them and play around with the sequence of events. evaluate ideas, as well as communicate them to others. Storyboards are   normally presented as a series of ‘frames’ that communicate a sequence of  When to use it events such as a customer journey.  You can use storyboarding at many points during a service design exercise. For   example to stimulate a focused discussion around key features; To imagine What you get  interactions in more detail; To gain useful insights to stimulate the prototyping If you’re using storyboards to represent your polished ideas you’ll get a visual  phase; To provide the necessary detail to enable people to grasp some of the and rich description of a service design that highlights key touchpoints and  more complex features of a proposition. moments. The tone and quality of the descriptions of course depends on the   style and skill of the storyboarder.       A storyboard storyboard!  
  16. 16. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Service
prototyping
     What you get  Service prototypes can support the design process by helping with many  questions, for example:  • Is the service functional?    • Is the service desirable for the customer or user?    • Is it easy for them to use?    • Is it strategically desirable to offer this service?       • Is it economically or logistically viable to provide this service? What I hear, I forget.  What I see, I remember.  What I do, I understand.  Lao Tzu     Service prototyping is suitable for several audiences. Potential service users What it is  can help refine a service’s design with their thoughts and feelings of a Service prototypes ‐ mockups of services ‐ allow us to experience and test  prototype experience. Project stakeholders from strategists to technical experts services before they’re produced. Prototypes provide insight on various service  can gain understanding of the service ‐ and its workings.  Prototypes can also aspects ‐ from desirability and usability, to viability. They can generate deeper  serve to excite clients ‐ and their colleagues ‐ about the proposed service. understanding than written descriptions or visual depictions, which don’t deal   as well with the time‐related and intangible aspects of services. Service prototypes can be rudimentary, comprising of acted‐out scenarios with hand‐sketched screens or improvised props. Conversely, they can be detailed mock‐ups of systems, props, environments, and “trained staff” ‐ to provide more realistic and convincing experiences.      Good news    When to use it  The roughest, earliest prototypes may serve mainly to inform designers, during  the generation and synthesis of ideas.  Learnings from early lo‐fi prototyping  usually prompt further design iterations.  Prototypes later in the design process (in the model or specify phases) are     usually higher fidelity. Detailed interface designs may be tested, and more Stop at the barrier  prototype elements may be “working,” rather than being suggested or “faked”.   Prototypes at this level often prompt minor design tweaks, or simply validate a  well‐designed service.     
  17. 17. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Empathy
tools
       What it is   Empathy tools, such as clouded spectacles and weighted gloves, help you to actually experience processes as though you yourself have the needs of different users. Using them can help prompt an empathetic understanding for users with disabilities or special conditions.  We are interested in finding out not just what people are saying and doing, but also what they are thinking and feeling. The difficulty is that people don’t always do, think or feel what they tell you.  This is why it is useful to employ some empathetic research techniques. At the same time, empathy tools are a great for designers to use too, enabling us to break out of the trap of designing for ourselves and start to see the challenge from the point of view from the end user.       When to use it  Empathy tools are best used at the beginning of the design process in  conjunction with ethnographic research. Sometimes, they become handy again  during service prototyping when you are interested in observing users in the  environment and context that they will be using the service that is being  developed.      What you get Empathy tools are a qualitative research method. Using them to carry out a few observations around the edge of a user group can be highly effective. With empathetic research you might closely observe some extreme users and gain lots of interesting insights which will inspire your service designs.      
  18. 18. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/  Ethnographic
user
research
 What The purpose of user research is to gain a thorough understanding of users. We seek to unlock the reasons why users do the things they do (drivers), the reasons why they don’t do things (hurdles). We will also seek to uncover and understand their lifestyles, behaviours and attitudes. In service design we are often interested in the journeys they take, the moods they are in and the modes they adopt.     Shadowing    When to use it  Design research is often used at the early stages or conception of a project.  However certain methods can be used at later stages for testing and verifying.  Design research is made up of a number of different empathic user research  methods. As designers we feel it is important for us to plan and conduct the  methodologies ‐ as during these stages inspiration and ideas are starting to  form and shape for the following innovative stage. We also recommend clients  attend our design research stages to not only understand the users but the  approach we adopt.     Empathetic user research methods  • Contextual interviews    • User journals    • Personas      • Shadowing and Observation Contextual interview    User research methods are based on ethnography, which is essentially observing people in their natural environment rather than a formal research setting. People and culture are incredibly complex, and our methods offer ways to make sense of this complexity seeing beyond our preconceptions. Most importantly this technique allows us to see patterns of behaviour in a real context.  What you get The reason we use design research is to reveal a deep understanding of people and to gain insights that shape innovation opportunities. We present design research in a number of different ways and formats depending on the user research method used and project needs. Either way they are always illustrative, contextual, and diagrammatic.    Observation     
  19. 19. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/       Shadowing
       What it is  When to use it Shadowing is a technique that allows you to immerse yourself in the lives of  We normally use shadowing techniques usually at the early stages of a project customers, front line staff and people behind the scenes. You usually spend up  to gain meaningful insights into people and their experiences of a service. It is to a day with people, quietly observing their daily routines and (if possible)  never used on its own, but as part of our wider ethnographic research. participating in their activities. Shadowing offers a vital advantage over   traditional forms of research like surveys or focus groups: they let you spot the   real moments when problems occur as well as situations where people say one thing but actually do something quite different.    Day shadowing at Walker Technology College  What you get Shadowing helps you understand how people really use your service, and how you could improve the experience in terms of what they would like the service to offer and not. Spending some quality time with people, allows you to see where problems arise, helping you for getting ideas of how to change it. Besides identifying process steps, resources and touchpoints, you tend to generate a more holistic view on how a complex system works, including the interplay of various stakeholders. We often produce a journey map as a representation of our findings.   
  20. 20. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Relationship
mapping
                                              What it is   Relationship mapping is a powerful tool that helps you understand services as systems made of people and their relationships. Services are created and consumed through systems of relationships between people, things and processes. In order to innovate within these systems, it is important to understand the network of relationships between the people and organisations that make a service work ‐ or that fail to make a service work. Relationship mapping helps you visualise those relationships.  What you get People are an implicit part of a service experience ‐ whether as providers or receivers of the service ‐ and relationship mapping helps you capture all stakeholders involved and understand how they currently work together. We usually work with participants to explore the relationships that they can influence ‐ and those that they can’t. We also ask them to qualify the nature of these relationships in terms of their purpose and what makes them succeed or fail.  By the end of the exercise, you’ll end up with a comprehensive map describing the connections between individuals, groups, organisations and   society. Visualising a system of relationships as a whole gives participants a  A relationship map developed for NESTA “way‐in” to redefining those relationships, roles and responsibilities to seeing how changes impact on each other.   When to use it We tend to use relationship mapping as part of the discovery stage, where we try to gain as many insights as possible. It is a great starting point for us to identify what changes need to be made in terms of people, roles and responsibilities as well as interactions. The relationship map can evolve from describing the current situation into specifying people’s roles for the new service and can become part of the Service Specification Document.  
  21. 21. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Service
Specification
Document  What it is A document that outlines in detail the various components and parts of a service as a single overarching record. Typically broken down into several major sections (depending on the type of service) which can include areas such as brand and proposition, people, environments and equipment, visual identity and communications, supporting processes and technologies etc.     Some sample service specifications  A service manager typically owns the document, and it can be useful for managing ‘service versions’ during roll out. It’s also a great way to get different implementation and maintenance teams to talk to each other in the same language.  What you get A single document, composed in various levels of detail across different service elements, which describes the complete service.  When to use it Service specification documents are best used when designing stand‐alone consumer services that will be ‘launched’ and have various different strands of work to tie together in advance. They can then be useful as a reference document for inductions, as well as a form of arbitration between different delivery agents, and a method of service versioning.   
  22. 22. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Desktop
walkthroughs
       What it is  What you get Acting out ideas for service interactions at a lego level! Desktop walkthroughs  A better understanding of the choreography of the service elements, and insight are very simple exercises in imagining a service experience using small, hand  into any inpractical or illogical ideas and moments. If you’ve been using sized toys. A typical desktop walkthrough involves a customer, a member of  different types of customers and contexts, you’ll also emerge from the desktop staff, an environment and some paper touch points. You literally walk through  walkthrough session with additional insight into specific needs, and hopefully a the service moment, taking pictures and ideally with another person, imagining  little more empathy to you plastic friends. You also get lots of cute photos of the what the various actors are doing, saying and feeling. It can be useful to run the  service moments you can use in storyboards or other activities later. walk through using various different personas, and under different imagined   situations.  When to use it   Use desktop walkthroughs to check your thinking when designing complex  service choreography, or when different people will have very different  experiences of the same environment, as well as to inject a bit of fun and 3D  focus to otherwise quite flat (i.e paper or screen based) design thinking.         What about the kids?   
  23. 23. ENGINE  METHODS http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/service_design/methods/    Experience
Surveying
      What you get What it is  Experience Survey outputs can be more qualitative or more quantitative Experience Surveying, sometimes called gap analysis, is a diagnostic method  depending on the sample size and research intent. Typically, the outputs are used to identify the differences between expectations and experiences of  presented as graphs, with research notes and recommendations on areas for service in order to uncover areas for improvement or innovation. Importantly,  further investigation and opportunities for innovation. In a quantitative Experience Surveying creates relative models of service quality, although at  exercise you’d expect to see detailed results broken down into a segmentation Engine we have some universal experience standards we try to use across all  model, in a more qualitative study we’d typically include supporting anecdotes Experience Surveying exercises.  and details of individual respondents. At the heart of Experience Surveying lies a simple premise: Your experience of   the quality of any service (or anything) is based in a large part on your  When to use it expectations prior to the experience. If your expectations are exceeded, it can  Engine generally uses Experience Surveys during the diagnostic phases of be said that you’ve had a good experience. Likewise, if your expectations are  service design and innovation projects. If enough appropriate data are gathered not reached, its fair to say you’ve had a poor experience.  in the early stages of a large service innovation project, they can be used during   later evaluation stages to measure impact.       Gap analysis in Excel  In order to measure the difference between expectation and experience, we    Entering expectations administer two identical surveys ‐ one to measure user’s expectations of   service quality within a generic sector, and one to measure users actual  Experience Surveys can also be valuable as a generative tool for unearthing experiences of service quality for a specific organisation (normally our clients).  new opportunities, or isolating service quality problem areas in an  organisation. They can also be used internally, to compare perceptions and Analysing the gaps between the two leads to insight and opportunities. The  understandings between teams and colleagues. trick (as with all surveying) is to know exactly what, and exactly who to ask.  In summary, Experience Surveys are an invaluable tool to diagnose areas for At Engine we use Experience Survey’s across many different types projects.  improvement or innovation, to build support for customer centric metrics, to Through this work we’re developing a proprietary set of service experience  make the case for change, and to measure performance of a project. It’s hard to benchmarks by sector that we’re constantly refining and improving.  argue with a graph, and harder still to argue with your customers.   

×