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Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
Deloitte  innovation in government
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Deloitte innovation in government

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Public service leaders around the globe are facing unprecedented challenges. The issues are complex and innovation is emerging as the key to successful government transformation. The need for …

Public service leaders around the globe are facing unprecedented challenges. The issues are complex and innovation is emerging as the key to successful government transformation. The need for innovation has never been greater and the time for action is now.





Canada has earned an enviable reputation as a model for public service excellence. The Public Policy Forum (PPF) and Deloitte partnered to engage nearly 100 public sector leaders in dialogue to discuss the challenges facing Canada’s public service, the measures being undertaken to innovate and the obstacles to change. Participants included leaders from all levels of government in every jurisdiction in Canada, as well as academics and others with senior public service experience.

Results of these conversations reveal numerous examples of public service innovation across our country and strategies for success through government innovation.

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  • 1. Innovation in government?Conversations with Canada’spublic service leaders
  • 2. ContentsExecutive summary ......................................................... 1Overview ........................................................................ 2Our method .................................................................... 3What we learned ............................................................ 4What should change ....................................................... 8The way forward............................................................. 9Appendix A: Innovation frameworks ............................. 10Appendix B: Participants ............................................... 11ContributorsDeloitte Public Policy ForumPaul Macmillan Garnet Garven – Lead ResearcherNational Public Sector Leader Senior Fellow416-874-4203 • pmacmillan@deloitte.ca 306-539-3244 • garnet.garven@ppforum.caJames Gordon David MitchellSenior Manager President and Chief Executive Officer604-601-3487 • jamesgordon@deloitte.ca 613-238-7858 • david.mitchell@ppforum.caAmy Valliquette Paul LedwellSenior Consultant Executive Vice President416-601-5726 • avalliquette@deloitte.ca 613-238-7160 • paul.ledwell@ppforum.caThe Public Policy Forum wishes to thank Deloitte for its support and partnership. We wish to acknowledge thecontributions of Mary-Rose Brown, Hala Domloge, Ryan Conway, Allison Bunting, and all of the Public Policy Forum.Other Deloitte representatives supporting the project or participating in the interviews were: Andy Potter (Toronto),Andrew Medd (Vancouver), Dale Daniels (Regina), Jamie Lanoue (London), Michel Brazeau (Ottawa),Charles Perron (Ottawa), Lucie Rivard (Quebec City), Marilyn Mucha (Edmonton), Rachel Hayward (Edmonton),Patrick MacNeil (Halifax), Paula Gallagher (Halifax), Richard Olfert (Winnipeg), Sangeet Bhatia (Winnipeg) andDavid Frost (Calgary). The project also received support of Joey Boayes (Vancouver), Debbie Stojanovic (Toronto)and Sarvani Chakravorty (Toronto).The Public Policy Forum and Deloitte wish to thank the close to 100 senior public service leaders from acrossCanada at all levels of government for their active participation in the interviews and contribution to this research.Designed and produced by The Creative Studio at Deloitte, Canada. 11-916GISBN 978-1-927009-12-3
  • 3. Executive summary The Public Policy Forum and Deloitte launched this project with the shared belief that in a post-recession, post-stimulus investment period, governments across the world will face resource challenges demanding innovative responses. We hold the view that innovation in government offers real promise to address many of these emerging challenges. What We engaged nearly 100 public sector leaders in one-on-one conversations about the challenges facing Canada’s public service, the measures being undertaken to innovate, we did… and the obstacles to change. We interviewed public service leaders in every jurisdiction in Canada at the federal, provincial, territorial and municipals levels. We also included some external views from academics and others with senior public service experience. What 1 The current public debate fails to set the stage for real reforms. New ideas are needed but political direction is required for successful innovation to occur. we learned… 2 Public service leaders expressed concerns that innovation is being limited to operations at a time when policy reforms are also needed. 3 The level of public service innovation in Canada appears low and disconnected. A defined innovation process and strategic approach is required. 4 Innovation is being pursued without substantive collaboration or sharing of information across government bodies. 5 The capacity to execute an innovation agenda needs to be strengthened. New skills and talent are required. What 1 More forums and venues for senior public service leaders to be open and frank about the challenges facing government and why innovation is needed. should change… 2 Increased recognition of the need for public service innovation to address the full continuum of policy formulation and execution. 3 Put ‘innovation as strategy’ into long-term planning. Greater executive oversight is needed to drive innovation. 4 More sharing and replication of innovation is required across jurisdictions and levels of government. 5 Increased priority on attracting and developing innovation leaders at all levels across the public service. This project was intended to assess the state of innovation in government in Canada and represents the first in a series of projects by the Public Policy Forum, Deloitte and other organizations interested in advancing public service and governance. Public service innovation 1
  • 4. OverviewPublic service leaders across Canada, and around theglobe, are facing unprecedented challenges. The financialmeltdown and subsequent stimulus spending have placedfinancial straitjackets on many jurisdictions. Yet, agingpopulations, global uncertainty, and new developmentsin social media contribute to growing demands on ourgovernments to respond swiftly and more creatively tocomplex challenges.While Canada has fared better than many jurisdictions, weare not immune to the serious challenges that threatenthe sustainability of many government programs –escalating health care costs, rising debt levels, and laggingproductivity, to name a few.The Public Policy Forum and Deloitte launched this projectwith the belief that innovation in government holdsthe promise to address many of these emerging publicservice challenges.Innovation is defined as acommitment by governments torecognize and act upon new ideas,new operating methods and newways of delivering services. Italso includes finding new ways tomaximize resources by engagingwith the public, taking new risksand harnessing new technologies.2 Public service innovation
  • 5. Our methodWe wanted to gauge the state of public service innovation in Canada. Specifically, Interview processwe sought to determine how innovation was viewed as a possible solution to the The interview guide used in the interview processchallenges governments face. We wanted to identify what innovations might be focused on the four areas below. The frameworks areavailable to public service leaders. Finally, we sought to understand the barriers that presented in Appendix A.stood in the way of successful public service innovation. 1. Innovation contextWithin this context, the Public Policy Forum and Deloitte set out to engage nearly To understand the context for innovation we asked100 public sector leaders in one-on-one conversations about the challenges facing about the emerging managerial environment thatCanada’s public service, the measures being undertaken to innovate, and the Canada’s senior public service leaders expected toobstacles to change. face over the next 3-5 years.While leadership happens at all levels in any organization, our conversations were 2. Innovation opportunitiesfocused at the upper echelons of the public service – cabinet secretaries, clerks, Based on the ‘size-up’ provided above, participantsdeputy ministers and city managers. This is where the critical interface between identified the innovation areas or themes thatpolicy and management takes place. We were particularly interested in learning and had the greatest potential. Nine thematic areas ofsharing the insights from those entrusted with translating policy into action, and with innovation were presented.achieving the difficult balance between promoting innovation and managing risk. 3. Innovation barriersParticipants hailed from every province and territory across Canada and from all We asked participants to reflect on the barrierslevels of government. We interviewed public service leaders at the federal, provincial, and other impediments to driving innovationterritorial and municipals levels. We also included some external views from academics and change across the broader public sector.and others with senior public service experience. Three general categories were provided: • Political leadershipSome were new to their roles and others possessed extensive experience across • Public acceptabilityseveral functional areas and levels of government. We spoke to leaders from a • Public service capacitycross-section of departments and ministries. 4. Innovation examplesTo encourage open and frank discussions, the Chatham House Rule1 was applied. We asked Canada’s public service leaders toNothing that was said in these interviews is attributed to an individual or a jurisdiction. offer examples of innovation from their jurisdiction or elsewhere.What was said (and not said) may surprise you.1 http://www.chathamhouse.org.uk Public service innovation 3
  • 6. What we learned New ideas needed: Without elected leaders initiating the necessary charge for What role for the Public Service? change, public service leaders feel unable to take on the Over and over, public service leaders expressed frustration sacred cows that inhibit reforms. They lament the lack of a at the disconnect between the level of public discourse frank public discussion of lightning rod issues such as the that is taking place and the magnitude of the challenges sustainability of our health care system, the effectiveness we face as a country. The failure to adequately and of our social assistance programs, and our productivity completely frame the true nature of the pressures we are gap. As a consequence, public service leaders find it under is seen as limiting the ability of leaders to move difficult to garner the political and public support required forward with the innovations they feel are necessary for meaningful public sector innovation. and achievable. There is recognition, however, that more can be done Many interviewees identified the need for an important to state the case for change and build the foundation policy discussion and full engagement of the public for innovation. Many public service leaders described the regarding the mandate of government. Many difficulty of presenting plans for innovation in ways that acknowledged the relative ease of program and service their ministers and cabinet tables could easily accept. expansion but the great difficulty in program contraction There is a widely held view that finding the right balance or rationalization. between transformative aspirations and manageable game plans is a key factor in preparing the political level for the Innovation in government must reflect the changing kind of public debate that is needed to launch meaningful nature and make-up of services and programs. While innovation in government. public service leaders strongly want to be part of these deliberations it was suggested that this would need to be But what is the role for public service leadership in the led at the political level. debate? Most have grown up in a system that expects anonymity for public servants and many are comfortable operating behind the scenes. There are some, however, who would be prepared to engage in a broader discussion, if presented with appropriate forums – something we feel is well worth exploring. Meanwhile, the public service quietly presses on, applying marginal, across the board, cost‑containment; tinkering at the edges of unsustainable programs; waiting for direction on the really big issues. The perceived political intolerance for risk, mistakes, or public backlash has become so high that truly innovative ideas are less likely to be presented or pursued.4 Public service innovation
  • 7. Caught between two roles:Lead policy advisor or chief executive? “Long‑term planning…much of my job is keepingThe 24/7, social media age is changing the role ofsenior public service leaders. We sensed a change in the lids on the pots. A good day is if there’s notheir strategic approach. While the focus on near-term issue that blows up in my face and I have to spendresults, such as emergency room wait times and averagetest scores, is making public service leaders attuned to the balance of the day briefing the Minister.”service delivery, strategic challenges in our economyand competitiveness do not receive adequate attention. We sensed a desire to cultivate a new breed of policyThese bigger challenges cannot be addressed with internet makers – professionals more adept at data analytics,speed, and therefore receive less political attention. stakeholder engagement, modern risk management,Besides, most governments come into power with very working across boundaries, and crafting policies with aclear platforms, focused on a fixed list of policy priorities. greater chance of successful implementation.Increasingly, new governments expect the public serviceto implement a pre-sold agenda, not present new Therefore, public service leaders are faced with the dualpolicy alternatives. challenge of making the case for modernizing the policy function and improving the effectiveness of service deliverySome public service leaders look back fondly to the days and implementation. The challenges being faced by mostwhen large policy shops could study big issues and design jurisdictions in Canada dictate that improvements insiderobust programs to address societal needs over a longer government are required on both dimensions, whiletime horizon. But those days are gone. Some public service recognizing the need for increased participation by otherleaders commented that in today’s world, the permanent stakeholders in policy and delivery.public service is no longer the primary source of policyadvice for ministers. In fact, newly elected governmentsincreasingly come into office with a healthy skepticism ofthose who are there to serve.We heard how many senior executives spend much oftheir time fighting the political brush fires that, fanned bythe power of the internet and instant communications, areconstantly at risk of blowing out of control. Meanwhile,political staffers, special interest groups and lobbyists gaingreater influence over a policy agenda that is focused onthe here and now.According to the executives we spoke with, the demandfor long-term policy setting has almost disappeared. Asa result, the organizational capacity for policy analysishas been eroded and the analytic tools being used areoutdated. Many are assessing what this could mean fortheir role as policy advisors. If policy is now developedat the political level, in consultation with individuals andorganizations outside of government, what is the role ofthe public service? In the future, will the deputy head rolebe more focused on operational excellence, more akin to achief operating officer? Public service innovation 5
  • 8. An innovation strategy: Doing more together: Are we focused on the right things? What are others doing? Public service leaders expressed concerns about whether While governments across Canada invest significantly in the basket of innovations being pursued is the right size pan-Canadian consultations, public service executives and shape. Large, complex organizations don’t stand still. acknowledge that there is relatively little actual replication Most leaders we spoke with were able to point to areas of innovations across boundaries, whether within or where innovation is happening. But, many public service across jurisdictions. leaders are struggling with separating the wheat from the chaff. They had difficulty distinguishing administrative Public service leaders tend to pursue innovations without improvements from more substantive innovation substantive collaboration with others who may be initiatives and determining the type of support needed attempting to overcome similar challenges. This leaves for implementation. some to believe they are navigating uncharted waters. In fact, our discussions revealed that many of the challenges Often, the innovations that they cited were viewed as they face are the same, both in substance and in process. being too narrow and disconnected from each other to Yet, these leaders are operating largely in isolation have a meaningful impact. To be sure, there are projects from each other. As a result, the potential advantages at the other extreme – so grand as to shake executive of replicating innovations across our cash strapped confidence in whether they will succeed. governments are not being pursued. Most do not have a strategy for innovation or a blue print There certainly is a growing awareness of the availability of for change. We were struck by the absence of enterprise- Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and other solutions and wide strategies and action plans for innovation. their applicability to governments at all levels. But, very few executives could point to where their organizations were actively collaborating with other government bodiesWhile there was great enthusiasm and interest in to reduce the costs of innovation or to increase the return on investment.the topic of public service innovation across all levelsof government, there was a general lack of major Generally, public service leaders agree on the need for more sharing of innovations across governments,activity in the area. It appears that there is much more especially in times of restraint. While many musedpotential for government innovation in Canada. about partnering with over levels of government and even other jurisdictions, there was little evidence of This is not to say that leaders are not proud of the actual collaboration. innovation they believe to be underway in their organizations. Rather, they acknowledge a limited The ‘not invented here syndrome’ is alive and well in understanding of the true nature of how much is being governments across Canada. Executives appear to be invested, where it is being invested, and to what end. a long way from changing this culture or introducing mechanisms to ensure their organizations are not Given the importance that visible leadership plays, there reinventing the wheel. is a need for public service leaders to become more engaged. Setting the strategy for innovation; leading There is an irresistible opportunity for an inter-jurisdictional investment allocation decision-making; assessing progress; network that supports the exchange of best practices, and removing obstacles are all things that require executive processes and innovations for public service organizations. level engagement. The uncertainty being expressed about Governments at all levels and regions need to actively whether the right things are being done appears to stem consider more collaborative strategies. in large part from the absence, in many organizations, of a defined innovation process that effectively engages the executive level of the public service.6 Public service innovation
  • 9. T. S. Eliot said “Always remember you’re unique, just like everyone else.”There appeared to be an assumption that public service innovation needsto be uniquely designed for a particular jurisdiction. The “not built here”syndrome was not the only issue; there was a sense that duplicating asuccessful innovation from a neighboring jurisdiction did not have thesame cachet as pioneering an innovation.Capacity building: projects to lead; and, a reliance on external consultants toWho leads innovation? assume project management roles. All of these contributePublic sector executives expressed concerns about the to the dearth of senior managers and executives withcapacity of their organizations to make innovative changes proven skills in implementing large-scale innovation.on a large scale. While important innovations are sprinkled There were very few cases where executives could pointthroughout most organizations, transformative changes are to rotation or exchange of senior managers betweenreported to be much more difficult to launch and sustain. agencies or across jurisdictions as a means of developing transformational leaders.A critical constraint is leadership capacity. Simply put,there are relatively few senior management and executive Furthermore, public service leaders pointed to a limitedlevel leaders in the public service with deep experience in success rate in bringing in executives from outside theleading successful transformation projects for Deputies to public service to lead transformations. While there arecall on to take charge of innovation strategies. successes to point to, in general private sector leaders can be difficult to attract into the public sector andThis shortage of qualified change leaders stems from are often challenged to adapt to the higher degree ofa number of factors. Lack of public service executive ambiguity they experience when working in a publicdevelopment programs focused on transformation or sector environment. Furthermore, there is very limitedinnovation leadership; the tendency to rotate senior opportunity for public sector leaders to gain experiencemanagers out of project management roles before through assignments or interchanges with privatesuccess has been achieved; a limited number of innovative sector firms. Public service innovation 7
  • 10. What should change? The good news is there is a lot of scope for innovation, at a time when we need it most. The bad news is that our most senior public service leadership is not as focused on this topic as we had expected. Fortunately, there is only upside from attempting to do more. Here is what we think needs to change. 1 There should be more forums and venues for senior public service leaders to speak frankly about the challenges governments are facing and where 3 Governments at all levels need to incorporate ‘innovation as strategy’ into medium and long-term planning. Governments need to address more ‘new innovation is needed. These should involve cross- ideas’ that will shape the future capacity to deliver governmental forums, and include sharing between high quality programs and services. Public service the public, private and social sectors. innovation holds real promise for those governments willing to confront these challenges. Public service More open dialogue about the challenges leaders should introduce more formal processes facing our public services and why reforms to enable executive level oversight of innovation are needed. investments and tracking of results. Innovation program management policies and practices driven from the executive level would provide greater 2 There should be increased recognition of the heightened emphasis on execution that is expected from senior public service leaders and the importance confidence in the innovation strategies that are being pursued. Innovation embraced as a strategic of operational excellence through innovation. As governments increasingly come to power with imperative for governments at all levels. formal policy platforms, and look to a wide range of stakeholders for policy input, the role of the senior public servant is evolving to one of policy execution. This is not to suggest that assessing the impacts of policy proposals and offering policy alternatives 4 Intergovernmental forums and networks should be created to focus specifically on the identification of successful innovations that hold potential for is no longer a critical component of the Deputy’s replication elsewhere. Strategic partnerships across job. This has implications for the qualifications and government would allow greater opportunity professional development experiences expected of for leveraging the investments that are made future public service leaders. in innovation. Recognition of the need for innovation in Doing more together. policy and delivery. 5 Greater emphasis and investment should be placed on attracting and developing the leadership talent required to increase innovation in government. This could include programs for developing transformational project leaders and greater interchange between the public and private sectors to expand the capacity of government to innovate. New skills and talent.8 Public service innovation
  • 11. The way forwardPublic service leaders around the globe are facing unprecedentedchallenges. The need for innovation has never been greaterand the time for action is now. Canada has earned an enviablereputation as a model for public service excellence. There aremany examples of public service innovation across our country.However, the stresses on our public services are mounting.Leaders recognize that continual innovation is needed to adaptto changing times.But, there are hurdles that must be overcome. More opendialogue on the need for change; reforms to policy andadministration; embracing public service innovation as a corepart of strategy; sharing best practices and developing nextpractices; and investing in transformational leaders are some ofthe ways that improvements can be made.This report is intended to contribute to the case for even greaterinnovation in public services and provide an action plan formoving forward. Public service innovation 9
  • 12. Appendix A: Innovation frameworks2 Context for innovation Opportunities for innovation • Growing financial concerns Role of the state/citizen • Increasing debt and deficits Government mandate, shifting responsibilities, • Constrained capital spending citizen-centered models • Restrictions on hiring • Increasing demand from the public Governance/organization • Pressure to reduce the size of government New forms of organization, new governance • Greater pressures from interest groups arrangements, partnering, collaborations, NGOs Barriers to innovation Policy/strategy Political leadership Legislative changes, citizen choice, best practice, • Awareness of the requirement for change policy reform • Willingness to support change • Governing political party congruence Process/procedure • Opposition party(s) congruence Regulatory reform, internal processes, operating • Election cycle dynamics procedures, risk-based permitting Public acceptability Structure/design • Lack of public awareness Program design, regional structures, shared • Need for public engagement services, outsourcing • Need to educate the public • Stakeholder resistance People/HR • Negative media coverage Performance management, contracting, workforce redesign, skills development, PS renewal Public service capacity • Lack of experienced change leaders Operations management/service delivery • Cultural resistance Logistics, LEAN strategies, program improvements, • Insufficient or under investment quality assurance, procurement • Labour agreements / relations • Challenges partnering with others Technology/systems High-tech & low-tech, telecom, info management, enterprise solutions, case management Financing P3s, government bonds, cost- sharing, revenue-sharing, capital financing10 Public service innovation 2 For additional information on the interview process see the public service innovation link at www.ppforum.ca
  • 13. Appendix B: List of interviewees3 Reg Alcock Claire Dansereau Graham Flack Shelly Jamieson Executive-in-Residence Deputy Minister Associate Deputy Minister Secretary of the Cabinet and Asper School of Business Fisheries and Oceans Public Safety Clerk of the Executive Council University of Manitoba Government of Canada Government of Canada Government of Ontario Wayne Anstey Maria David-Evans Patrick Francis David Johnstone Acting City Manager Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Halifax Regional Municipality Aboriginal Relations Aboriginal Affairs Transportation Government of Alberta Government of New Brunswick Government of New Brunswick Bill Baker Deputy Minister Glen Davies Denis Garon Greg Keefe Public Safety City Manager Secrétaire associé Deputy Minister to the Premier Government of Canada City of Regina Sous-secrétariat aux technologies and Clerk of the Executive Council de l’information et bureau Government of Nova Scotia Penny Ballantyne Kelliann Dean du dirigeant principal de Deputy Minister of Executive Commissioner l’information John Kershaw Council and Secretary to Cabinet Public Service Commission Ministère des services Deputy Minister Government of the Northwest Government of Nova Scotia gouvernementaux Education Territories Government of Quebec Government of New Brunswick Tony Dean Penny Ballem Professor Giles Gherson Robert Lapper City Manager School of Public Policy and Deputy Minister and Deputy Minister City of Vancouver Governance Associate Secretary of Cabinet Labour University of Toronto Government of Ontario Government of British Columbia Rory Beck Clerk of the Executive and Ron Dedman Francois Guimont Judith Larocque Secretary to the Cabinet Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Government of Prince Edward Government Services Public Works and Canadian Heritage Island Government of Saskatchewan Government Services Government of Canada Government of Canada Gilles Bernier Gilles Demers Glen Laubenstein Former Deputy Minister Former Deputy Minister Sandra Hardy Chief Administrative Officer Ministère du Développement Développement économique, Deputy Minister City of Winnipeg économique, de l’Innovation l’Innovation et l’Exploration Culture, Heritage and Tourism et de l’Exportation Gouvernement du Québec Government of Manitoba Yvon Leblanc Government of Quebec Deputy Minister Cassie Doyle Vicky Harnish Justice and Consumer Affairs Janice Charette Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Government of New Brunswick Deputy Minister Natural Resources Finance Human Resources and Government of Canada Government of Nova Scotia Don Leitch Skills Development Former Deputy Minister Government of Canada Simon Farbrother George Haynal Government of British Columbia City Manager Vice President Former Clerk John Clarkson City of Edmonton Government Affairs Government of Manitoba Deputy Minister Bombardier Inc. Innovation, Technology, Don Fast Louise Lemon Energy and Mines Deputy Minister Jean Houde Deputy Minister Government of Manitoba Science and Universities Former Deputy Minister of Supply and Services Agency Government of British Columbia Finance Government of New Brunswick Doug Clow Government of Quebec Deputy Minister David Ferguson G. Sandy MacDonald Finance and Municipal Affairs Clerk of the Executive Council Bonny Hoyt-Hallett Deputy Minister Government of Prince Edward and Secretary to the Cabinet Deputy Minister Education and Early Childhood Island Government of New Brunswick Environment Development Government of New Brunswick Government of Prince Edward Murray Coolican Judith Ferguson Island Deputy Minister Deputy Minister James Hughes Energy Community Services Deputy Minister Carolyn MacKay Government of Nova Scotia Government of Nova Scotia Social Development Deputy Minister Government of New Brunswick Human Resources Jacques Cotton Jeff Fielding Government of New Brunswick Deputy Minister City Manager Byron James Ministère de la Santé et des City of London Deputy Minister Peter Ma Services sociaux Post-Secondary Education, Deputy Minister Gouvernement du Québec Training and Labour Finance, Government of New Brunswick Government of Nunavut 3 Roles and titles effective date of interview Public service innovation 11
  • 14. Kevin Malloy Alastair O’Reilly Gabriel Sekaly Ed WalshDeputy Minister Deputy Minister Chief Executive Officer ChairService Nova Scotia and Fisheries and Aquaculture Institute of Public Administration Public Service CommissionMunicipal Relations Government of Newfoundland Canada Government of NewfoundlandGovernment of Nova Scotia and Labrador and Labrador Milton SussmanBrian Manning Yves Ouellet Deputy Minister Peter WallaceDeputy Minister of Secrétaire générale associé, Health Deputy Minister of Finance andExecutive Council Secrétariat aux priorités et aux Government of Manitoba Secretary of the Treasury BoardGovernment of Alberta projets spéciaux Government of Ontario Gouvernement du Québec Genevieve TanguayFrancine Martel-Vaillancourt Sous-ministre adjointe – Lori WanamakerDeputy Minister Stephen Owen recherche, de l’Innovation, de la Deputy MinisterRevenue Québec Vice President science et société Tourism, Culture and ArtsGouvernement du Québec University of British Columbia Ministère du Développement Government of British Columbia économique, l’Innovation etMichael Mayne Jeff Parr l’Exportation Peter WatsonDeputy Minister Deputy Minister Gouvernement du Québec Deputy MinisterInnovation and Advanced Labour and Immigration Alberta EnergyLearning Government of Manitoba Paul Theriault Government of AlbertaGovernment of Prince Edward Vice PresidentIsland Larry Pedersen Human Resources Markus Weber Deputy Minister New Brunswick Power Deputy Minister of ExecutiveJessica McDonald Agriculture and Lands CouncilFormer Deputy Minister to the Government of British Columbia Ian Thompson Government of NunavutPremier Deputy MinisterGovernment of British Columbia Liz Quarshie Economic and Rural Stuart Whitley Deputy Minister Development and Tourism Deputy MinisterRon McKerlie Environment Government of Nova Scotia Health and Social ServicesDeputy Minister Government of Saskatchewan Government of the YukonGovernment Services Robert ThompsonGovernment of Ontario Ken Rasmussen Clerk of the Executive Council Tim Wiles Associate Dean and Assistant and Secretary to Cabinet Deputy MinisterMargaret Melhorn Director Government of Newfoundland Finance and EnterpriseDeputy Minister Johnson-Shoyama Graduate and Labrador Government of AlbertaFinance School of Public PolicyGovernment of the Northwest University of Regina Owen Tobert Don WincheraukTerritories City Manager Chair Heather Reichert City of Calgary Public Service CommissionMatthew Mendelsohn Deputy Minister Government of SaskatchewanDirector Advanced Education and Literacy Annette TrimbeeMowat Institute Government of Manitoba Deputy Minister Wayne Wouters Advanced Education and Clerk of the Privy Council andLuc Meunier Angus Robertson Technology Secretary to CabinetPrésident Deputy Minister Government of Alberta Government of CanadaCommission de la Santé et de la Energy, Mines and ResourcesSécurité du travail du Québec Government of the Yukon Francois Turenne Glenda YeatesGouvernement du Québec Deputy Minister Deputy Minister Dominque Savoie International Relations HealthDoug Moen Deputy Minister Gouvernement du Québec Government of CanadaDeputy Minister to the Premier Ministère de l’Emploi et de laGovernment of Saskatchewan Solidarité sociale Marian Tyson Neil Yeates Gouvernement du Québec Deputy Minister Deputy MinisterJanet Moodie Justice Citizenship and ImmigrationDeputy Minister of Executive Jeffrey Schnoor Government of Nova Scotia Government of CanadaCouncil and Cabinet Secretary Deputy MinisterGovernment of the Yukon Justice Peter Underwood Marian Zerr Government of Manitoba Deputy Minister Deputy MinisterJeff O’Farrell Natural Resources Social ServicesDeputy Minister Allan Seckel Government of Nova Scotia Government of SaskatchewanCommunity Services Deputy Minister to the PremierGovernment of the Yukon and Cabinet Secretary Paul Vogt Government of British Columbia Clerk of Executive Council and Cabinet Secretary Government of Manitoba12 Public service innovation
  • 15. Public service innovation 13
  • 16. DisclaimerThis publication contains general information only, and none of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, its member firms, or its andtheir affiliates are, by means of this publication, rendering accounting, business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or otherprofessional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such professional advice or services, nor should itbe used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your finances or your business. Before making any decisionor taking any action that may affect your finances or your business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser.None of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, its member firms, or its and their respective affiliates shall be responsible for any losswhatsoever sustained by any person who relies on this publication.About Deloitte Public Policy ForumDeloitte, one of Canada’s leading professional services firms, provides Building Better Governmentaudit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services through more The Public Policy Forum is an independent, not-for-profit organizationthan 7,600 people in 57 offices. Deloitte operates in Québec as dedicated to improving the quality of government in Canada throughSamson Bélair/Deloitte & Touche s.e.n.c.r.l. Deloitte & Touche LLP, an enhanced dialogue among the public, private and voluntary sectors.Ontario Limited Liability Partnership, is the Canadian member firm of The Forum’s members, drawn from business, federal, provincial andDeloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. territorial governments, the voluntary sector and organized labour, share a belief that an efficient and effective public service is important in ensuringDeloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, Canada’s competitiveness abroad and quality of life at home.a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network ofmember firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent Established in 1987, the Forum has earned a reputation as a trusted,entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description non-partisan facilitator; capable of bringing together a wide range ofof the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited and its stake-holders in productive dialogue. Its research program providesmember firms. a neutral base to inform collective decision making. By promoting information sharing and greater links between governments and other sectors, the Forum helps ensure public policy in our country is dynamic, coordinated and responsive to future challenges and opportunities.© Deloitte & Touche LLP and affiliated entities. © 2011, Public Policy Forum30 Wellington Street West, P.O. Box 400 Stn., Commerce Court 1405 – 130 Albert StreetToronto, ON M5L 1B1 Ottawa, ON K1P 5G4Tel: 416-601-6150 • Fax: 416-601-6151 Tel: 613-238-7160 • Fax: 613-238-7990www.deloitte.ca www.ppforum.ca

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