AC4D design library data insights themes

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Austin Center for Design is an
educational institution in Austin, Texas,
teaching Interaction Design and Social Entrepreneurship
- See more at: http://www.ac4d.com/home/news/#sthash.SYjQ5U6H.dpuf

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AC4D design library data insights themes

  1. 1. Data, Insights and Themes Jon Kolko Director, Austin Center for Design
  2. 2. SYNTHESIS/ Translation
  3. 3. Ethnography Synthesis Prototyping Making meaning through abductive sensemaking and reframing Combining data in new ways Identifying patterns and anomalies Judging, and learning 3 | 11/4/2012
  4. 4. I saw this + I know this = Insight 4 | 11/4/2012
  5. 5. I saw this + I know this = Insight Data gathered through ethnography, contextual inquiry, questionnaires, and interviews 5 | 11/4/2012
  6. 6. I saw this + I know this = Insight Guided by ethics & morals, intellectual prowess, and the accumulation of world view and breadth of experience 6 | 11/4/2012
  7. 7. I saw this + I know this = Insight Clear, deep, meaningful perception into a particular design context 7 | 11/4/2012
  8. 8. I saw this + I know this = Insight 8 | 11/4/2012
  9. 9. I saw this + I know this = Insight Make observations Analyze your field notes and document interesting observations, anomalies, or things you found particularly unique. 9 | 11/4/2012
  10. 10. I Saw This: Observations Document as many key observations as you can, and start to organize them. WRITING OBSERVATIONS/ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Hang your field notes to the wall so you can discuss them. Using a highlighter, highlight what you think is important, surprising, evocative, or interesting. Identify 3-5 observations from the highlighted data. Write each one on a pink post-it note. When writing observations, keep them short and succinct, but be sure they are complete thoughts – someone else should be able to understand them. 10 | 11/4/2012
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  12. 12. 12 | 11/4/2012
  13. 13. He’s changed his mental model of what “diet” means He “listens” to his body. His new mental model enables him to eat better. Cooking has become a craft for him. Control was the key to happiness. Control enables him to reconcile eating “good” with eating “bad”. 13 | 11/4/2012 He’s okay celebrating the “bad” qualities of bad food.
  14. 14. I saw this + I know this = Insight Make observations Analyze your field notes and document interesting observations, anomalies, or things you found particularly unique. 14 | 11/4/2012 Group & interpret Group the observations by similarity. Ask “why?” about each observation group – and start to answer the “why” based on your own personal experiences and what you know about the situation.
  15. 15. I Know This: Group & Interpret Group similar observations, and start to ask “Why?” and “What does this mean?” GROUPING & INTERPRETING/ 1. 2. 3. 4. Place similar observations physically next to each other. For every action, statement, and emotion, ask – out loud – “Why?” and “What does this mean?” Answer the questions, and write notes as necessary on the pink post-it notes. Use a different color pen, so you can identify your interpretations from the behavior you actually observed. 15 | 11/4/2012
  16. 16. Why does mindset matter so much? Control enables him to reconcile eating “good” with eating “bad”. He’s changed his mental model of what “diet” means Control was the key to happiness. He “listens” to his body. His new mental model enables him to eat better. Where does this control come from? How is control encouraged? What’s the relationship between craft, pride of creation, and knowingly eating bad food? 16 | 11/4/2012 Cooking has He’s okay become a craft for celebrating the him. “bad” qualities of bad food. Why is this selfregulation important to him?
  17. 17. I saw this + I know this = Insight Make observations Analyze your field notes and document interesting observations, anomalies, or things you found particularly unique. 17 | 11/4/2012 Group & interpret Group the observations by similarity. Ask “why?” about each observation group – and start to answer the “why” based on your own personal experiences and what you know about the situation. Draw insights Draw insights from the key observations in each group. Format the insight as a provocative statement of truth.
  18. 18. Insights Draw 3-5 insights from the key observations in each group. DRAWING INSIGHTS/ 1. 2. 3. 4. Draw insights from the observations you’ve written by looking at the patterns, both in the data and in your life. Answer the Why and What Does This Mean questions. You’ll need to make things up based on your own life and experiences; the answers are not in the data. They are in you. When you’ve crafted an insight statement, write a one-sentence description of it on a yellow post-it note. Place the yellow insight note near the pattern of observations that it relates to. 18 | 11/4/2012
  19. 19. A health mind equals a healthy body. Control enables him to reconcile eating “good” with eating “bad”. He’s changed his mental model of what “diet” means His new mental model enables him to eat better. You don’t have to He “listens” to give his body. up what you love to eat healthy. Self-awareness can be a barometer for health. Control was the key to happiness. Achieving balance leads to gaining control. There’s an art to Cooking has He’s okay making, eating, become a craft for celebrating the him. and enjoying good “bad” qualities of bad food.and bad food. 19 | 11/4/2012
  20. 20. A health mind equals a healthy body. He’s changed his mental model of what “diet” means His new mental model enables him to eat better. You don’t have to He “listens” to give his body. up what you love to eat healthy. These insights are valuable – this is abductive reasoning! Control enables him to reconcile eating “good” with eating “bad”. Self-awareness can be a barometer for health. Control was the key to happiness. Achieving balance leads to gaining control. There’s an art to Cooking has He’s okay making, eating, become a craft for celebrating the him. and enjoying good “bad” qualities of bad food.and bad food. 20 | 11/4/2012
  21. 21. I saw this + I know this = Insight Make observations Analyze your field notes and document interesting observations, anomalies, or things you found particularly unique. 21 | 11/4/2012 Group & interpret Group the observations by similarity. Ask “why?” about each observation group – and start to answer the “why” based on your own personal experiences and what you know about the situation. Draw insights Draw insights from the key observations in each group. Format the insight as a provocative statement of truth.
  22. 22. Jon Kolko Director, Austin Center for Design jkolko@ac4d.com Download our free book, Wicked Problems: Problems Worth Solving, at http://www.wickedproblems.com 22 | 11/4/2012

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