Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
AC4D design library 2x2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

AC4D design library 2x2

494
views

Published on

Austin Center for Design is an …

Austin Center for Design is an
educational institution in Austin, Texas,
teaching Interaction Design and Social Entrepreneurship
- See more at: http://www.ac4d.com/home/news/#sthash.SYjQ5U6H.dpuf
All content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This license means that, while the author retains the copyright to the work, you are permitted to a) share this work with anyone you like, as long as you don't charge money for it; b) change this work and re-release it under your own name, with attribution to the original source; and c) integrate this work into your own work in small or large portions.

Published in: Design, Business, Technology

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
494
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 2 x 2 for Creative Downselection Matt Franks Professor, Austin Center for Design
  • 2. How do you know which ideas are best? There are multiple ways to evaluate an idea: •  Manufacturability •  Marketability •  Uniqueness / innovation •  Business decisions •  etc..
  • 3. The 2x2 Comparison By comparing ideas across similar criteria, we are able to find the best candidates for further exploration.
  • 4. For Example: Low impact on environment If we were to evaluate our toothbrush ideas from the reframing exercise, we might choose the following criteria: Aesthetically boring Aesthetically pleasing High impact on environment
  • 5. Low impact on environment ! Aesthetically boring Aesthetically pleasing High impact on environment
  • 6. Lasts a long time Makes brushing boring Makes brushing pleasing Wears out quickly
  • 7. Lasts a long time ! Makes brushing boring Makes brushing pleasing Wears out quickly
  • 8. Easy to hold / ergonomic Costs a lot to manufacture Costs little to manufacture Harder to hold
  • 9. Easy to hold / ergonomic ! Costs a lot to manufacture Costs little to manufacture Harder to hold
  • 10. Easy to hold / ergonomic Costs a lot to manufacture Costs little to manufacture Harder to hold
  • 11. Easy to hold / ergonomic Costs a lot to manufacture Costs little to manufacture Harder to hold
  • 12. Easy to hold / ergonomic Costs a lot to manufacture Costs little to manufacture Harder to hold
  • 13. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 1.  Identify a potential list of evaluation criteria, thinking about which constraints are most important for you particular context. For Example: -  Easy to manufacture – Hard to manufacture -  Perceived as innovative – Perceived as incremental -  Is pleasing – Is not pleasing -  Provides value to user – Doesn’t provide a lot of value to user 13
  • 14. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 2.  Draw a large 2x2 and position your first two criteria on opposing axis. For Example: Easy to manufacture Not easy to use Easy to use Hard to manufacture 14
  • 15. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 3.  Work through each design idea, and position it on the 2x2, comparing the placement of each idea to the axis and the other ideas on the 2x2. It’s common practice to place the first few ideas towards the center of the axis. Try and start away from the center, repositioning the first few ideas if necessary. 15
  • 16. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 4.  As you establish a precedent of approximately 10 ideas on the grid, revisit the first few and reposition them. Often times, the first few ideas are a little more separate than we originally thought. 16
  • 17. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 5.  When you have lots of ideas stacked on top of each other, revisit them and reposition them. After closely comparing similar ideas, we will often find more discrepancies between them, pushing them apart from one another. 17
  • 18. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 6.  When all ideas have been mapped, examine the ideas that are in each corner. Some of the best ideas are obvious; others are hidden. For example, the most expensive idea may provide the most user value. 18
  • 19. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 7.  Look at the remaining clusters of ideas and ask, “what do all of these ideas have in common?” Sometimes we are able to generate additional good ideas by finding patterns, and then exploring the opposing value. For example: In looking at a broad cluster of tooth brush ideas, we might recognize that all of these ideas are a brush at the end of some type of handle. We might come up with additional ideas by asking ourselves, “What if the toothbrush had no handle?” 19
  • 20. Evaluating ideas with a 2x2 8.  Document the best ideas, take a photo of the 2x2, and then repeat the process by substituting the next set of evaluation criteria. Repeat this process until all of the ideas have been compared against each set of evaluation criteria. 20
  • 21. Activity: In groups, organize the ideas from yesterday’s session with a 2x2: 1.  2.  3.  4.  Create a blank grid on a whiteboard, wall, or piece of foam core Define realistic criteria to compare your ideas, and add this criteria to the grid Start placing ideas. Compare each idea to the criteria and its surrounding idea After you’ve placed 10 ideas, go back and re-place them •  Do these really belong in their initial position? Why / why not? 5.  Continue, until all of your ideas are on the grid. •  You shouldn’t spend more than 10 – 15 seconds placing each idea. Go with your instinct; you can always change it later. 6.  After all of your ideas are on the grid, step back and look for any obvious clusters •  What do all of the ideas in this cluster have in common? •  Capture and place these ideas as well 7.  Pick the top 3 ideas – by group consensus •  Idea must have a physical and digital element •  Can be prototyped and tested
  • 22. Matt Franks Professor, Austin Center for Design Mfranks@ac4d.com Download our free book, Wicked Problems: Problems Worth Solving, at http://www.wickedproblems.com

×