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  • India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi: भारतगणराज्यBhāratGaṇarājya; see also other Indian languages), is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by geographical area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the west, and the Bay of Bengal on the east, India has a coastline of 7,517 kilometres (4,700 mi).[15] It is bordered by Pakistan to the west;[16]People's Republic of China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka, the Maldives, and Indonesia in the Indian Ocean.Gradually annexed by the British East India Company from the early eighteenth century and colonised by the United Kingdom from the mid-nineteenth century, India became an independent nation in 1947 after a struggle for independence that was marked by widespread non-violent resistance.[18]It has the world's twelfth largest economy at market exchange rates and the fourth largest in purchasing power. Economic reforms since 1991 have transformed it into one of the fastest growing economies;[19] however, it still suffers from high levels of poverty,[20]illiteracy, disease, and malnutrition.
  • The largest metropolis by area and the 2nd largest metropolis in India.
  • And comprises a fantastic cocktail of stench, movement, uproar and fumes.
  • The pre-eminent political and spiritual leader of India during the Indian independence movement. He was the pioneer of satyagraha—resistance to tyranny through mass civil disobedience, firmly founded upon ahimsa or total non-violence—which led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. His birthday, 2 October, is commemorated there as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Non-Violence.
  • It is their lives that fuel the city's roaring street economy
  • The subject matter of this photo also tells of the plight of many children in India.
  • Sanskrit for "great king“ On the eve of independence in 1947, India (including present day Pakistan) contained more than 600 princely states, each with its own ruler, often styled Raja or Thakur (if the ruler were Hindu) or Nawab (if he were Muslim), with a host of less current titles as well.
  • Thousands of wild monkeys roam the streets of Delhi. Monkeys are viewed as the sacred embodiment of the Hindu god Hanuman, fed by devotees and worshipped as idols.
  • Its original intention was to allow royal ladies to observe everyday life in the street below without being seen, since they had to observe strict "purdah" (cover).
  • Here as in all parts of India, the wildlife is a part of the fabric of life, not relegated to a zoo. Cows lie lazily in the middle of a busy intersection. Seemingly oblivious to its awkward location, it chews nonchalantly as motorcycles, cars, rickshaws, and bicycles whiz past with only inches to spare. The cow is a natural element in this city scene – like a rock in a fast flowing stream of water.
  •  Chandella Temples, Khajuraho = The temples at Khajuraho were built during the Chandella dynasty, which reached its apogee between 950 and 1050. Only about 20 temples remain; they fall into three distinct groups and belong to two different religions – Hinduism and Jainism. They strike a perfect balance between architecture and sculpture. The Temple of Kandariya is decorated with a profusion of sculptures that are among the greatest masterpieces of Indian art.
  • Chandella Temples, Khajuraho = The temples can be said to have a theme: woman. A celebration of womankind, her myriad moods and facets. These are carvings of a woman writing a letter, applying make-up to her eyes, combing her tresses, dancing, playing with her child. Innocent, coquettish, smiling, seductive, passionate and beautiful, all depicted in intricate detail, sharply etched, sculpted with consummate skill.
  • Chandella Temples, Khajuraho = To appreciate the erotic arts of India, one must understand the role of sex in the scheme of things according to Hinduism.  Every Hindu has to undergo sixteen denotary rituals (samskara) and four stages of life (ashramas). The final aim of life is salvation, which is the merging of the individual soul (atma) with the supreme soul (paramatma). One can attain salvation (moksha) through dharma, artha and kama. The ancient Indians took a healthy, integrated view of all aspects of life and gave sex its due importance in the overall picture. The pursuit of pleasure (kama) is one of the important aims of life, on the path to deliverance.
  • Varanasi = Varanasi’s known history dates back about 3500 hundred years. Varanasi = Along the river, stairways have been set-up, known as ghats, from which people can bathe before saying their daily prayers. Varanasi = The major tourist activity in Varanasi is to take a boat ride down the Ganges in the early morning to watch the devoted take morning baths in the river, and to view the variety of architectural attractions along the river. Varanasi = Leaving at dawn on a boat taxi, I was totally taken by the sheer numbers of people trying to reach the Ganges river for a morning bath. It seemed like the entire city was trying to stream through the narrow streets, alleyways and ghats to get to the river. The noise and the chaos was amazing. Varanasi = The Ganga the most important river of the Indian Subcontinent is held much in reverence since it is believed that all human sins are washed off by a dip in its sanctified waters. The water may have greyed with pollution but not the belief of the people who travel sometimes thousands of miles to come to the holy city and to the holy river. 
  •  Varanasi = The Ganga the most important river of the Indian Subcontinent is held much in reverence since it is believed that all human sins are washed off by a dip in its sanctified waters. The water may have greyed with pollution but not the belief of the people who travel sometimes thousands of miles to come to the holy city and to the holy river.
  • The Ghoomar = They whirl and move in a circle to the accompaniment of a kettledrum. Moving round, sometime anti-clock-wise and sometime clockwise and with measured steps and various graceful inclinations of body, snapping fingers at particular cadences.
  • . Rama, while leaving for the forest upon being banished from the kingdom for 14 years, turns around to his followers and asks all the `men and women' to return to the city. Among his followers the hijras alone do not feel bound by this direction and decide to stay with him. Impressed with their devotion, Rama sanctions them the power to confer blessings on people on auspicious occasions like childbirth and marriage, and also at inaugural functions. This set the stage for the custom of badhai in which hijras sing, dance and confer blessings.
  • With a city population of 564,589(As of 2001[update]) Kochi city ranks first among cities in Kerala, in the population density with 5950 per km2.[citation needed] As of 2009[update], Kochi had a metropolitan area population of 1,541,175.[2]Scheduled castes and tribes comprise 14% of the city's population. The female-to-male ratio is 1,024:1,000, significantly higher than the all-India average of 933:1,000. Kochi's literacy rate is 94%.
  • Wildlife sanctuary is about 300 square miles and centered around an artificial lake fed by the Periyar River.
  • Mumbai (Marathi: मुंबई, Mumbaī, IPA: [ˈmʊm.bəi] (help·info)), formerly Bombay, is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra. The city proper is the most-populous in the world, with approximately 14 million inhabitants.[1] Along with the neighbouring suburbs of Navi Mumbai and Thane, it forms the world's 4th largest urban agglomeration, with around 19 million people.[3] Mumbai lies on the west coast of India and has a deep natural harbour. As of 2009, Mumbai was named an Alpha world city.[4]

India presentation India presentation Presentation Transcript

  • India
    • 1.2 billion people
    • 2nd most populous country.
    • 12th largest economy.
    • 4th largest in purchasing power.
    • 2nd largest labor force in the world.
    • Became an independent nation in 1947
    • Four major religions, Hinduism, Buddism, Jainism, and Sikhism originated here.
  • Delhi
    • 12.25 million inhabitants
    • 16 million residents in the region
  • Monuments
    QutbMinar, 240 ft-high tower of victory, built in 1193, after the defeat of the last Hindu kingdom in Delhi.
    India Gate, 135 ft-high, built as memorial to Indian soldiers killed in the World War I.
    JamaMasjid, built in 1656, is the largest mosque in India, and stands across the road from the Red Fort.
  • Markets
    ChandniChowk: The main street of 'Old' Delhi is a magnificent bazaar jam-packed with artisans, traders and auto-rickshaws.
  • Mahatma Ghandi
    Raj Ghat, a simple black marble memorial to Mahatma Gandhi, marking the spot where he was cremated following his assassination in 1948. Ghandi's Birthday (2 Oct - Gandhi Jayanti) .
  • Monuments
    QutbMinar, 240 ft-high tower of victory, built in 1193, after the defeat of the last Hindu kingdom in Delhi.
    India Gate, 135 ft-high, built as memorial to Indian soldiers killed in the World War I.
  • Lotus Temple
    The Bahá'í laws emphasize that the spirit of the House of Worship be that it is a gathering place where people of all religions may worship God without denominational restrictions.
  • Bicycle Entrepreneurs
    Cycle rickshaw sleeping
    Bicycle Cafe
    On the sidewalks of the city where one-man entrepreneurs sell everything from food and clothes to second-hand books and electronic gadgets. Many of these small businessmen have migrated to the city from villages.
  • Street Economy
    When you come to a complete stop at a traffic light in India's major cities you'll likely be approached by every type of vendor.
    Estimates cite figures of between 60 and 115 million working children in India -- the highest number in the world (Human Rights Watch 1996).
  • Children
  • Maharajas
  • Wildlife is Part of the Fabric
    Wild monkeys roam the streets of Delhi. Monkeys are viewed as the sacred embodiment of the Hindu god Hanuman.
  • Jaipur
    • Known as the Pink City
    • Capital of Rajasthan state.
    • 3 million residents.
  • HawaMahal
    The Palace of Winds. Built in 1799 by Maharaja Sawai Singh. Made of red and pink sand stone. Tier after tier of 953 small casements, each with tiny lattice worked pink windows. These small windows circulate cool air (Hawa) even in hot months. 
  • JantarMantar
    Built between 1728 to 1734 by Jai Singh as an observatory.
  • Street Scenes
  • Street Scenes
  • Rural Rajastan
  • Amber Palace
    Located in Amber, 11 km from Jaipur. It was the ancient citadel of the ruling clan of Amber, before the capital was shifted to Jaipur.
  • Road to Amber Palace
  • Amber Palace
  • Women’s Work in Rural India
    It is not uncommon for women to spend up to fours hours a day bringing water from distant sources to their homes. They carry up to 15 liters on their heads on each trip, often walking barefoot.
  • Cow Dung
  • Agra
    • Founded in 1504.
    • Capital of Mughal Empire.
    • 1.3 million residents.
  • TajMahal
    Shah Jahan, known for his keen interest in architecture, gave Agra its most prized monument, The TajMahal. Built in loving memory of his wife MumtazMahal, the mausoleum was completed in 1653.
  • TajMahal
    Shah Jahan’s son Aurangzeb usurped his father’s control and imprisoned him in Agra Fort.
  • FatehpurSikri
    Built during the second half of the 16th century by the Emperor Akbar, FatehpurSikri (the City of Victory).
  • Saris
    It takes nearly 15 days of difficult labor to weave nine yards (eight meters) of the shimmering multi-hued silk sari.
    Each piece can cost from $150 to $1,500, depending on the fineness, tightness of the weave, and amount of gold brocade.
    The weaver earns approximately $30 a month for weaving the saris.
  • Khajuraho
    Khajuraho has the largest group of medieval Hindu and Jain temples, famous for their erotic sculpture.
    The group of monuments has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Chandella Temples
    The 20 remaining temples at Khajuraho were built during the Chandella dynasty, between 950 and 1050.
  • Female Form
    A celebration of womankind, her myriad moods and facets. These are carvings of a woman writing a letter, applying make-up to her eyes, dancing, playing with her child. All depicted in intricate detail.
  • Erotica
  • Arranged Marriages
    Often the most important aspect is the bond between the two families, rather than the relationship between the couple being married.
    Supporters of the custom say that divorce rates are lower than among western society because parents are better able to choose a suitable partner for their children.
  • Varanasi
    Regarded as holy by Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains.
    Varanasi’s known history dates back about 3,500 hundred years.
    It is one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world.
  • Street Scenes
    The narrow alleys, which pass off for streets, covered with the dirt, grime, and betel nut stains lead to the ‘ghats’ or the banks of the river. These ‘ghats’ are the hub of the religious ceremonies of the Hindus.
  • Ganesha & Kali
    As atmospheric as it is confusing, Varanasi's labyrinthine Old City is rich with culture
  • The Ganga
    The most important river in India is held much in reverence since it is believed that all human sins are washed off by a dip in its waters. People travel thousands of miles to come to the holy city and river.
  • Ghats
    Along the river, stairways have been set-up, known as ghats, from which people can bathe before saying their daily prayers.
  • Puja
    At the times of worship or ‘puja’ the air is resonant with the chanting of mantras and hymns.
  • Puja
  • Puja
    Puja is modeled on the idea of giving a gift or offering to a deity or important person and receiving their blessing.
  • Cremation Ghats
    From the cremation of dead and associated rites to celebration of birth and its various rituals, all are adhered to on these ‘ghats’.
  • Udaipur
    • Known as the City of Lakes
    • 550K residents.
  • Jagdish Temple
    Temple built by MaharanaJagat Singh in 1651 and enshrines a black stone image of Vishnu as Jagannath, Lord of the Universe.
  • City Palace
  • Lake Palace
    250-year-old white-marble palace -- the main set for the James Bond film Octopussy -- floats like a vision in the middle of Lake Pichola. Access to the hotel is provided by water taxi.
  • Music & Dance of Rajasthan
  • Hijras
    Known as eunuchs, transexxuals, or those who are "neither male nor female." Hijras trace their origins to myths in the Ramayana and the Mahabharata.
  • Thali
    Small bowls arranged inside the rim of the plate(or leaf), each filled with a different sort of spiced vegetarian food, curd and sweet.
  • Kerala
    • 32 million people in State of Kerala.
    • 91% literacy rate, the highest in India.
  • Kathakali Dance
    Kathakali stories were initially composed to last a whole night. The most popular stories enacted are Mahabharata.
  • Paradesi Synagogue
    The Malabari Jews formed a prosperous trading community of Kerala, and they controlled a major portion of world wide spice trade. In 1568, the Jews of Kerala constructed the Paradesi Synagogue adjacent to Mattancherry Palace, on land given to them by Paraja, the Raja of Kochi.
  • Fishing Community
  • Overland Journey to Thekkady
    Located on the Tamil Nadu & Kerala border. The road winds through mountains, descending through a carpet of tea bushes, estates of tall rubber trees and gardens of coffee, cardamom and pepper.
  • Backwaters
  • Backwaters
  • Periyar Game Preserve
  • Children of Kerala
  • Mumbai
    • 14 million residents; 19 million in area.
    • Financial capital of India.
  • Density
    The population density is estimated to be about 22,000 persons per square kilometre.
  • Crawford Meat Market
    Mumbai suffers from the same major urbanisation problems seen in many fast growing cities: widespread poverty and unemployment & poor public health.
  • Train to Victoria Terminus
    With available space at a premium, Mumbai residents often reside far from workplaces, requiring long commutes on crowded mass transit. The network of suburban trains radiating out from Victoria Terminus station is instrumental in keeping Mumbai running.
  • Dabba-Wallahs
    Lunch box (tiffin) delivery person collects the freshly cooked food in from the residences of the office workers (mostly in the suburbs), delivering it to their respective workplaces.
  • Dhobi-Wallahs
    Along the perimeter, coloured streamers of clothes are hung up to dry. Later, they will be starched and ironed, a small cloth tag with identifying black dots and dashes sewn into the edge of each garment, and the dhobis will hand deliver bundles of garments to homes and hotels across the city.
  • Prostitutes on Falkland Road
    An estimated 4,000 prostitutes work the Falkland Road district alone. In nearby Kamatipura, an even larger flesh-trade bazaar, as many as 20,000 women sell their bodies. In 1997, tests found that only 1 percent of Bombay prostitutes were infected with HIV. Just five years later, 54 percent of the sample tested positive.
  • Children of Mumbai
  • Gateway of India
    The Gateway of India was built to commemorate the visit of King George V & Queen Mary to Mumbai in 1991 (85ft high). The last British troops to leave India, passed through the Gateway in a ceremony on 28 February 1948