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Rest And Sleep, Bedmaking
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Rest And Sleep, Bedmaking

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  • 1. Rest and Sleep Bed Making Skill and Rational
  • 2. Why is it so important?
      • The bed is particularly important to people who are ill. It is essential the nurse keep the bed as clean and comfortable as possible.
      • Physical Comfort
      • Psychological comfort
  • 3. Rest and Sleep
    • Healing and Optimal Health
    • Promoting Sleep
  • 4. Nursing Process
    • Assessment
      • Usual pattern of rest/sleep
      • bed routines
    • Nursing diagnosis
      • Sleep pattern disturbance
    • Plan
      • Sleep aids
  • 5. Nursing process
    • Implementaion
      • Regular habits
      • Nutrition/exercise
      • Quiet time prior to sleep
      • Warm milk
      • Sleep/wake cycle
      • Back rub
      • Comfortable bed
  • 6. Nursing Process
    • Evaluation
      • Good night sleep
  • 7. Promoting Rest and Sleep
    • Rest period
    • Nonessential tasks
    • Night time/early am bathing
    • Lab work
    • Cluster activity
    • Visitor control
    • Interventions prn
  • 8. Comfort Measures for Promoting Sleep
    • Administer hygiene measures for clients on bedrest
    • Loose fitting nightwear
    • Remove or change any irritants against the client’s skin (moist dsg., drainage tubes)
    • Position and support dependent body parts to protect pressure points and aid muscle relaxation
  • 9. Comfort Measures for Promoting Sleep
    • Provide caps and socks for older clients and those prone to cold
    • Void before bedtime
    • Analgesics or sedatives 30 min. prior H.S.
    • Bedtime massage/backrub
    • Comfortable mattress and a clean dry bed!
  • 10. Noisy Nightshift
    • Close doors to clients’rooms/work areas if possible
    • Telephone/paging equipment
    • Noisy footwear
    • Equipment
    • Bedside monitors
    • TV/radio
    • Conversations
  • 11. Client’s Environment
    • Chairs
      • Straight back post surgery
      • Lounge chair
    • Lighting
      • Overbed
      • Night light
      • Call light
    • Overbed table
    • Bedside table
  • 12. Special Mattresses
    • Types
    • Regular firm, plastic covered
    • Mattresses used to prevent & treat decubitus ulcers
        • KCI beds
        • Eggcrate
        • Sheepskin
  • 13. Special mattresses are not a substitute for nursing care
    • Turn patients Q2h
    • Skin care
    • positioning
  • 14. Considerations
    • Bed position
      • Safety
      • Body mechanics
      • Gatchs
    • Infection control
    • Skin breakdown
  • 15. The bed changing process
    • Every health care agency wants the end product to be neat, clean, comfortable and durable.
    • Economical
      • Time
      • Equipment
      • Energy, patients and nurses
  • 16. Assembling Equipment
    • 2 sheets
      • Fitted/flat for bottom
      • Flat for top
    • Pillowcases
    • Cotton/rubber drawsheet as needed
    • Soaker
    • Bedspread
    • Blanket
  • 17. Linen Overload
    • Just what you need
    • Cost control
    • Once linen brought into a client’s room, if unused, must be discarded for laundering
    • Excess linen causes clutter and obstacles in a cramped space
  • 18. Rubber drawsheet
    • Save on linen
    • Time
    • Turning and positioning
    • Placed under cotton drawsheet
    • Drawsheet extends from above waist to midthigh.
    • Absorbs secretions due to urinary/fecal incontinence
  • 19. Linen Change
    • As per hospital protocol
      • Cost
      • Pillow cases/drawsheet OD
      • Soiled or bath day
      • Laundry shute/hamper
      • If soiled with feces/blood
      • Use of gloves
  • 20. Skill
    • Under no circumstances do you place dirty linen on floor, footstool, another patient’s bed or on over the bed tables.
    • Assessment
    • What needs to be changed
    • Client’s condition
  • 21. When does the bed get changed?
    • Usually after client’s bath
    • Client is sitting in chair
    • Out of room for tests
    • Check throughout day and straighten linen prn
    • After meals, if eating in bed, check for food particles
    • Change linen that is soiled or wet
  • 22. Effective Body Mechanics and Bed Making
    • Maintain good body alignment
    • Use the large muscles of the body
    • Work smoothly and rhythmically
    • Push or pull rather than lift
    • Use your own weight to counteract the weight of an object.
  • 23. Nursing Diagnosis
    • Activity intolerance
    • Impaired physical condition
  • 24. Types of Bed
    • Occupied
    • Unoccupied
    • Surgical/post-op beds
  • 25. Occupied Bed
    • Gloves if drainage
    • Check chart/kardex for client’s activity
    • Talk to the client, explain procedure
    • Privacy
    • Assemble all equipment, incontinent pads prn
    • Safety with side rails/call bell
    • Wash hands before and after
  • 26. Planning
    • Expected outcomes
    • Best time to change linen
    • Equipment needed
  • 27. Implementation
    • Wash hands
    • Gloves prn
    • Equipment
    • Adjust bed height-HOB down
    • Lower side rail- remove call bell
    • Loosen linen
    • Keep soiled linen away from uniform
  • 28. Infection Control and Bed Making
    • Microorganisms are present on the skin and in the general environment.
    • Some microorganisms are opportunists; that is, they can cause infections when conditions are favorable ( break in skin, mucous membranes)
    • Clients are often less resistant to infections because of the stress resulting from an existing disease process.
  • 29. Infection Control and Bed Making
    • Microorganisms may be transferred from one person to another or from one place to another by air, by inanimate objects or by direct contact among people. Therefore:
    • Avoid holding soiled linen against uniform
    • Never shake linen
    • Always wash hands before going to another patient.
  • 30. Avoid shaking linen for infection control purposes
    • Linen to be reused
      • fold and place on chair
    • Soak and rinse linen soiled with feces or blood before placing in hamper
    • Make sure no tripads, personal articles or anything besides linen is placed in hamper
  • 31. Evaluation
    • Inspect bed
      • Clean
      • Neat
      • Wrinkle free
  • 32. Always be alert to client comfort and safety during bedmaking.
    • When finished evaluate
      • Safety re bed position
      • Call light
      • Side rails
      • Unit tidy
      • Personal belongings are within reach
  • 33. Accessories
    • Bed cradle/foot cradle
    • Fracture board
    • Foot board
    • Toe pleat
    • Therapeutic Frames allow movement for immobilized patients & help prevent complications R/T immobility
  • 34. Remember
    • To make bed, position is elevated
    • When completed, bed is lowered
    • If occupied, patient comfort & safety
    • Soiled linen away from uniform
    • Gloves prn
    • Bath before making bed if occupied

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