Social Networking 101 for Nonprofits

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Lean more about social networking and social media for nonprofits.

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  • Fundraising Capital Campaigns Board members leveraging their networks Tell-a-friend Event fundraising House parties Giving Circles Alumni Decade or Year Leaders Local fundraisers – hairdressers, brownie troops, Volunteering Corporate volunteer groups High school teams College sororities/fraternities Phone banks to networkEvents Corporate Teams Participants and their donor networks Tables at GalasAdvocacyGrasstops recruiting local grassroots participants Viral campaigns Tell-a-friends Get-out-the-vote phone banking Canvassing among your networkService Delivery Education: volunteer leaders who host events, lead learning circles, mentor a team Healthcare: parents mentoring one another, emotional support Alumni Events: Alum volunteers who pull together their network of alums for a picnic or tailgate Technology: technical support Blood Drive: Corporate day
  • Social Networking 101 for Nonprofits

    1. 1. Social Networking Strategy for Nonprofits<br />By Frank Barry(Blackbaud) and Jeff Patrick (Common Knowledge)<br />
    2. 2. Who’s Talking?<br />Jeff Patrick<br />President<br />Common Knowledge<br />@commonknow ^jp<br />Frank Barry<br />Managing Consultant<br />Blackbaud<br />@franswaa<br />FB<br />
    3. 3. Question?<br />What is a Social Network?<br />FB<br />
    4. 4. Social Network<br />A collection of people tied together by their relationships around a common area of interest.<br />A network of networks.<br />JP<br />
    5. 5. Social Network Example - Jason<br />Jason<br />Soccer Team<br />CA Stanford Alumni <br />Jason<br />Networks:<br /><ul><li>Soccer Team
    6. 6. Stanford Alum
    7. 7. Nonprofit Job
    8. 8. Church Choir</li></ul>Church Choir<br />Nonprofit Job<br />JP<br />
    9. 9. Important Concepts About Jason & His Network<br />JP<br />
    10. 10. Social networking facilitates relationship building via improved communications and collaboration in a social environment.<br />Social networking is the means to an end.<br />Social networking assists in the delivery of your programs, services and mission.<br />FB<br />
    11. 11. Online Social Networks<br />House Social Networks<br />Built on nonprofit website<br />Owned & operated by nonprofit<br />Integrates well with 3rd party software<br />Great community management tools<br />Commercial Social Networks<br />Facebook , Twitter<br />Built-in audience<br />Owned by commercial entity<br />Integrates with 3rd party software<br />Minimal community management tools<br />FB<br />
    12. 12. Example<br />Commercial Social Network<br />FB<br />
    13. 13. Example – Commercial Social Network<br />http://www.facebook.com/livestrong<br />FB<br />
    14. 14. Facebook Community: People<br />The hear of a social network is people. <br />No people = no network<br />No people = no social<br />FB<br />
    15. 15. Facebook Community: Reaching Out<br />FB<br />
    16. 16. Facebook Community: Engagement<br />Events<br />Comm.<br />eStore Promo<br />Blog Post<br />FB<br />
    17. 17. Facebook Community: Comments & Discussion<br />FB<br />
    18. 18. Facebook Community: Comment Counts<br />FB<br />
    19. 19. Facebook Community: Discussions<br />FB<br />
    20. 20. Facebook Community: Events<br />FB<br />
    21. 21. Facebook Community: Media<br />FB<br />
    22. 22. Service, Programs & Mission via Social Network<br />LIVESTRONG is able to meet these objectives:<br />Engagement / Communication<br />Awareness / Education<br />Advocacy & Activism<br />Fundraising<br />Volunteering<br />CHANGE<br />FB<br />
    23. 23. Example<br />House Social Network<br />JP<br />
    24. 24. Example – House Social Network at Sierra Club<br />JP<br />
    25. 25. Community, People & Profiles<br />JP<br />
    26. 26. Tioga Jenny Profile (cont.)<br />JP<br />
    27. 27. User Generated Content: Community Discussions<br />JP<br />
    28. 28. UGC: Events<br />JP<br />
    29. 29. UGC: Targeted “Groups”<br />JP<br />
    30. 30. Organizational Blog<br />JP<br />
    31. 31. Advocacy Actions: Organization + UGC<br />JP<br />
    32. 32. Service, Programs & Mission via Social Network<br />Sierra Club is able to deliver on these objectives:<br />Awareness<br />Education<br />Advocacy & Activism<br />Engagement<br />Volunteering<br />CHANGE<br />JP<br />
    33. 33. Question?<br />How are online social networks used by nonprofits?<br />JP<br />
    34. 34. Answer:<br />Social networks are increasingly integral to most aspects of nonprofits & their work<br />Fundraising<br />Volunteering<br />Events<br />Advocacy<br />Service Delivery<br />JP<br />
    35. 35. Examples of Social Networks Within Nonprofits<br />JP<br />
    36. 36. Examples of Social Networks Within Nonprofits<br />FB<br />
    37. 37. Examples of Social Networks Within Nonprofits<br />FB<br />
    38. 38. Examples of Social Networks Within Nonprofits<br />JP<br />
    39. 39. Examples of Social Networks Within Nonprofits<br />JP<br />
    40. 40. Example<br />Arthritis Foundation<br />JP<br />
    41. 41. House Network: Arthritis Foundation<br />JP<br />
    42. 42. “Connecting people with Rheumatoid Arthritis”<br />RA Connect<br />JP<br />
    43. 43. History <br />2003: Arthritis Community 1.0<br />Chats<br />Discussion Group<br />Personal Pages<br />Audio Success Stories<br />Goal: Peer-to-Peer Support; Acquisition & Cultivation<br />JP<br />
    44. 44. Community 1.0 - Conclusions<br />Chats were not popular (“critical mass problem”)<br />Success stories were expensive to collect (“Audio”)<br />Personal pages under-utilized (“not customizable”)<br />Discussion Groups were very popular<br />JP<br />
    45. 45. Features<br /><ul><li> Discussion Groups
    46. 46. Blog
    47. 47. Profiles (Robust)
    48. 48. Podcasts</li></ul>Arthritis Community 2.0<br />JP<br />
    49. 49. Arthritis Community 2.0<br />Content = Education<br />JP<br />
    50. 50. Generation Two<br />JP<br />
    51. 51. Generation Two – Discussion Groups<br />JP<br />
    52. 52. Generation Two<br />JP<br />
    53. 53. Profiles<br />JP<br />
    54. 54. Cross-Pollination to other Online Communities<br />JP<br />
    55. 55. Arthritis Community Strategy<br />Lets Talk RA<br />RA Connect<br />Lets Move Together<br />Others (Future)<br />Strategy: Targeted communities to serve individual segments of the base, tied together via a universal profile.<br />JP<br />
    56. 56. Types of Social Networking Communities<br />JP<br />
    57. 57. Risk assessment<br />Online Social Networks<br />FB<br />
    58. 58. Issues & Concerns with Nonprofit Social Networks<br />“You’re going to ruin our brand”<br />“Our opponents are going to have a field day”<br />“I’m not sure we can trust our constituents to say the right thing”<br />“Won’t a few bad people ruin it for the community?”<br />“What if a community member says something that isn’t true (about us)?”<br />“How do we manage everything?”<br />FB<br />
    59. 59. Community Management & Moderation<br />Role<br />Manager<br />Auditor<br />Police<br />Community Advocate<br />Brand Evangelist<br />Editor<br />Market Researcher<br />FB<br />
    60. 60. Real Issues Require Real Strategies<br />This is a short list of examples to get you thinking about the realities of managing an online social network<br />FB<br />
    61. 61. Social Networking Culture<br />Be democratic<br />Be transparent<br />Be real<br />Be a person<br />Be engaged<br />Dialogue not monologue<br />BE all of these things, but employ a realistic and professionalcommunity management strategy, policy, and team.<br />FB<br />
    62. 62. Return on investment<br />Online Social Networks<br />JP<br />
    63. 63. ROI for Social Networking Sites & Communities<br />Soft ROI<br />Awareness & branding<br />Education<br />Higher level of engagement<br />Higher affinity for organization<br />Community Building<br />Email List Acquisition<br />Advocacy<br />Volunteer recruitment<br />FB<br />
    64. 64. ROI for Social Networking Sites & Communities<br />Hard ROI<br />Annual or membership fundraising<br />Event fundraising (peer-to-peer)<br />Major Donors<br />Advertising<br />Underwriting<br />Sponsorship<br />Cause Marketing<br />Grants<br />JP<br />
    65. 65. Staffing & Resources<br />Online Social Networks<br />JP<br />
    66. 66. Resourcing for Social Networking Projects<br />JP<br />
    67. 67. Social Networking Budgets<br />JP<br />
    68. 68. Final point<br />Online Social Networks<br />FB<br />
    69. 69. Social Networking Success<br />Experimentation is OK … at the beginning<br />Then Be Sure to Have:<br />Objectives<br />Audience<br />Metrics<br />Resources<br />Budget<br />Executive Support<br />Demand Entrepreneurial Growth<br />FB<br />
    70. 70. Questions?<br />Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/-bast-/349497988/sizes/l/<br />
    71. 71. Social Media Webinar Series<br />http://www.blackbaud.com/bb/internet/social-media.aspx<br />
    72. 72. The End … We appreciate your time!<br />Frank Barry<br />Managing Consultant<br />Blackbaud<br />858.795.8947<br />www.blackbaud.com<br />frank.barry@blackbaud.com<br />@franswaa (http://twitter.com/franswaa) <br />Jeff Patrick<br />President & Founder<br />Common Knowledge<br />www.commonknow.com<br />jpatrick@commonknow.com<br />@commonknow (http://twitter.com/commonknow) <br />

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