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Business Decisions Done Right: Through the Four Elements of User Experience
 

Business Decisions Done Right: Through the Four Elements of User Experience

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By capturing four key elements of user experience, we are able to help business leaders and product managers prioritize decisions by understanding what matters most to their target users.

By capturing four key elements of user experience, we are able to help business leaders and product managers prioritize decisions by understanding what matters most to their target users.

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    Business Decisions Done Right: Through the Four Elements of User Experience Business Decisions Done Right: Through the Four Elements of User Experience Presentation Transcript

    • Business Decisions Done Right: Through a UX Perspective Frank Guo, PhD Principal, UX Strategized frank.guo@uxstrategized.com 1
    • What’s UX Strategy, and Why Do Businesses Need it? 2
    • Topic: Improving business decisions through UX strategy Professional background – UX research and strategy  Set up and led UX research for large companies  Worked for Oracle, eBay, Barclays, BlackRock  Shaped the design of award-winning Web and mobile products  An award-winning UX paper based on peer review  Published more than a dozen of UX papers  Co-authored a book chapter  PhD in cognitive psychology, UCLA Improved UX, product strategy, and marketing for  eBay  Yahoo!  PayPal  StubHub  Motorola  Cisco  IMVU Discuss improving business through UX with Frank: 650.678.8061 • frank.guo@uxstrategized.com • www.uxstrategized.com • www.frankguoblog.com 3
    • The Current State of UX – Perceived as Equivalent of Design Viewed as an implementation tool Limited to digital UI Huge opportunities missed UX is more than just UI design  UX Strategy 4
    • Demystifying “UX Strategy” – False Assumptions Is just about the digital UI Is just about improving product usability Is about UI design principles and patterns Is about brand identity and color palette UX strategy ≠ UI guidelines 5
    • What “UX Strategy” Is Really About – Informing Business Decisions Prioritize business opportunities Today, will introduce a tool Uncover hidden business opportunities UX strategy = drive business decisions through a UX perspective 6
    • Example of UX-Driven Business Decisions – Identifying Features of an iPhone App Features identified: Blog, charts, watch list, and reports 7
    • Example of UX-Driven Business Decisions – Improving Adoptability of Corporate Social Platform Key to user adoption: personalize content, up-to-date information, communicate based on topics 8
    • UX Strategy Tool 1: VADU Model – Prioritizing Business Opportunities 9
    • Not Just Usability – It’s the Holistic Experience that Drives Usage Products VADU UX Factors Value Adoptability Desirability Customers Usability Note: The model is based on a series of articles published on UX matters The images are from freedigitalphotos.net 10
    • The Building Blocks of the VADU Factors Feature Content Value Desirability Visual appeal Functional appeal Discoverability First use Repeat use Task completion Navigation Findability Readability Consistency Adoptability Usability 11
    • Definitions CX Element Description Value Is it useful? Feature Do the features support user needs? Content Does the content provide value? Adoptability Is it easy to start using? Discoverability Is the product discoverable by the prospective user without overt marketing? First use Is the first-use experience streamlined and delightful? Repeat use Will the user come back to use it more after first use? Desirability Is it fun and engaging to use it? Visual appeal Is the product visually appealing? Functional appeal Is the product engaging to use? Usability Is it easy to use? Task completion Is it easy to complete tasks? Navigation Is it easy to go from one place to another? Findability Is it easy to look for a particular piece of information? Readability Is it easy to scan and read content? Consistency Is the UI consistent (visual presentation, page layout, user interaction, etc.)? 12
    • What If a VADU Factor Is Missing? Missing Value Missing Adoptability People won’t use it if there is no value Adoptability Value People can’t use it if they don’t know how to start Desirability Usability Desirability Usability Value Adoptability Value Adoptability Desirability Users will stop using if it’s difficult to use Users won’t use it as often if there is no fun Missing Desirability Usability Missing Usability 13
    • Not All UX Elements Are Created Equal – Varies with Business Model Gaming Example Enterprise Software Example 0.8 1.0 0.5 0.2 Adoptability Value Value Desirabil ity Usability Desirability 0.5 Adoptabil ity Usability 0.3 0.7 1.0 14
    • Not All UX Elements Are Created Equal – Varies with Business Model Social Network Example Ecommerce Site Example 1.0 0.5 Value Desirability 1.0 1.0 Adoptability 1.0 Value Desirability Usability Adoptability Usability 0.5 1.0 1.0 15
    • Using the Model to Prioritize Work hard on value presentation Align features to user needs Develop features that differentiate on Value Visual presentation needs to support value propositions and usability 16
    • Using the Model to Prioritize Focus on getting users started Focus on making it addictive Usability and Value play supporting roles 17
    • Why VADU Model? It’s all About Business Prioritization Peter Morville’s UX Honeycomb VADU Model Vs. Focus on business impact Focus on UI design Simple to use for prioritization Too many elements to help with prioritization All elements are about general UX Not all elements are related to general UX 18
    • Value: Develop Products/Features that Add Value to Users Good implementation: Customer Reviews are always valuable Comparison table helps with shopping decisions 19
    • Value: Develop Products/Features that Add Value to Users Poor implementation: The image doesn’t present value to users 20
    • Adoptability: Make It Easy to Start Using the Product/Feature Good implementation: Upselling premium service in the context of using the product 21
    • Adoptability: Make It Easy to Start Using the Product/Feature Poor implementation: How can a first-time visitor sign up? 22
    • Desirability: Make It Engaging and Addictive Good implementation: Desirable ≠ Looking nice 23
    • Desirability: Make It Engaging and Addictive Poor implementation: The homepage doesn’t look exciting 24
    • Usability: Make It Easy for Users to Do Tasks Good implementation: Very easy to set up a meeting and send invites in Gotomeeting 25
    • Usability: Make It Easy for Users to Do Tasks Poor implementation: How can I get rid of the grid on the screen? Have to Google the solution 26
    • VADU UX Element Application Value Monetization model Product definitions & features Branding & positioning Adoptability Marketing Download and installation SEO First-use workflow and “front door” experience Desirability Product features Workflow Visual design and content strategy Usability IA and workflow design Interaction design Visual design 27
    • VADU UX Element Application VADU together Prioritizing business opportunities  Project roadmap  KPIs and metrics  Customer satisfaction surveys  Product and design review checkpoints 28
    • Used as Scorecard UX Element Actual Score Target Score Value 3 2 Adoptability 5 8 Desirability 9 10 Usability 9 5 Actions: Focus on Adoptability Can sacrifice Usability as trade-off 29
    • Used as Scorecard UX Element Actual Score Target Score Value 3 10 Adoptability 5 5 Desirability 9 3 Usability 9 7 Actions: Focus on Value Can sacrifice Desirability and Usability as trade-off 30
    • Used as Scorecard UX Element Actual Score Target Score Value 3 10 Adoptability 5 10 Desirability 9 10 Usability 9 10 Actions: Focus on Value and Adoptability 31
    • Case Study – It’s About Adoptability, Not Usability FB Connect is very easy to use, but hard for people to adopt in an eCommerce space. 32
    • VADU Business, Product, and Design Checklist Value     Feature/Need alignment – Does your product support user needs? Branding and marketing messaging – Does your branding and marketing messages align with value propositions? Differentiation – Is it compelling for new users to see “why” they should use your product? Monetization model – Does the monetization model align with users’ value perception of your product? Adoptability        Exposure – Can non-users be exposed to your product, through SEO, ads, product reviews, etc.? Installation – Is it easy for users to download and install? First-use experience – Is the first-use experience streamlined and engaging? Tutorials – If the product is complex to use, do you have tutorials to get them started? Emails – Are there welcome emails and email tips that help users start using the product? Landing page – If users find your product through SEO or ads, do you have well-designed landing pages? Decision aid – What kind of decision making help do you offer for users to choose a product of yours? Desirability    Engaging experience – Do the look and feel, branding, features, and content excite users? Content abundance – Do you have enough interesting content for users to “get lost” in your product? Gamification techniques – Have you applied gamification techniques, when appropriate, to your product Usability         Discoverability – Are information and calls to action easy to discover? CTA – Does your UI have relevant and clear calls to action? Readability of content – Is it easy for users to review information? Comprehensibility – Is your content written in a way that’s easy to understand? Error handling – Does your UI let users know and recover from errors? Navigation and IA – Is it easy for users to go from one place to another? Is the information well organized? Findability – Can users easily find that they seek? Accessibility – Does the UI support accessibility design? 33
    • Q&A To read more about UX strategy examples and ideas, check out my UX blog: www.frankguoblog.com Have questions or suggestions? Feel free to email me at: frank.guo@uxstrategized.com 34
    • About UX Strategized Unlock business value through user experience  Insight  Advice  Outcome About the firm: We are a boutique digital strategy and design firm based in San Francisco bay area. Leveraging awardwinning experience and proprietary techniques, we provide end-to-end digital strategy and design consulting, specializing in performing 360-degree UX research and analysis, driving digital strategy that unlocks business opportunities and elevates user experience, developing UI architecture that lays down a solid experience design framework, and providing usability solutions that dramatically improve ease of use and user engagement. Improved UX, product features, and marketing for Industries: enterprise software, eCommerce, finance, mobile        eBay Yahoo! PayPal StubHub Motorola Cisco IMVU Professional background         Award-winning digital products An award-winning UX paper based on peer review Published more than a dozen of UX papers Co-authored a book chapter Frequent speaker at professional conferences Led UX research for major companies Developed many UX guidelines and trained professionals in applying them PhD in cognitive psychology, UCLA Request a free consultation from Frank: 650.678.8061 • frank.guo@uxstrategized.com • www.uxstrategized.com 35