Wollongong futures draft strategy report for exhibition 14 a
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Wollongong futures draft strategy report for exhibition 14 a

on

  • 1,225 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,225
Views on SlideShare
1,212
Embed Views
13

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

3 Embeds 13

http://www.wollongongfutures.com 8
http://sitebuilder.yola.com 4
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Wollongong futures draft strategy report for exhibition 14 a Wollongong futures draft strategy report for exhibition 14 a Document Transcript

  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Executive Summary The Futures Process "In the Year 2025, Wollongong will be a sustainable local government area, safeguarding the economic, social, cultural and environmental well-being of present and future generations". The City of Wollongong is now looking to its future. The Wollongong community has mapped out a future for the region and its people. The Wollongong Futures Plan embodies the approach that we will take as a community to achieve sustainable outcomes for the city and its people, for the environment and the local economy. The Futures Plan is broad in its scope and impact, but at the heart of the Plan is our desire to develop a sustainable region. The plan also identifies the actions that are required to realise this vision. Wollongong Futures is a strategic planning initiative that has helped us as a community to think about the future we want, to develop a shared vision, and to plan how to achieve it. The process has enabled us to determine the way we would like to see the City of Wollongong develop over the next 20 years. This report takes the futures analysis to its final stage by incorporating the key research findings with the community inputs, in order to shape an operational strategy that links key actions. The Futures Plan is not just a plan for Wollongong City Council and its own activities. The Plan is a comprehensive long term vision for Wollongong. Within its scope are desired outcomes that will also require actions by government at all levels - State and National, and actions by business and the community. The Wollongong Futures Plan is a living document. It is designed so that the broad visions can be re-visited every 5 years, so they can be reviewed and updated to reflect changing demographics, new community needs and emerging opportunities. Achievements and outcomes will be tracked on an ongoing basis, through Council’s Strategic Plan and its Corporate Plan. Future Directions The Wollongong Local Government Area (LGA) has a unique structure. It is a linear city with urban development concentrated within a relatively narrow coastal strip between the Illawarra Escarpment and the Pacific Ocean. The LGA stretches for around 70 kms along the coast. This unique structure has lead to the development of several distinct areas of settlement to the North and South of the Wollongong city centre. As well as impacting on residential areas, the city structure has also influenced the pattern of manufacturing, retail and service employment. There is a strong concentration of jobs in and around the Wollongong City Centre.1 Most of the knowledge based service employment is located in and around the city centre and this includes business services, financial services,1 Recent analysis by Buchan Consulting shows that almost 50% of jobs are located in an area thatincludes the city centre and the immediate adjacent areas in the north and west of the city. (EconomicAnalysis of the Wollongong Central City Area Volume 1 Report, Buchan Consulting November 2004) 1
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005higher education and government services. Health services are also focusedin the City Centre.To the south of the City Centre, the steelworks and industrial areas adjacentto the Port account for a substantial part of the region’s manufacturing relatedjobs.Servicing local populations, there is a series of shopping centres located atThirroul, Corrimal, Figtree, Warrawong and Dapto. These areas also includea range of local service businesses.From a social perspective, the unique geography also impacts on theaccessibility of community and cultural facilities and the number of localfacilities needed to serve an elongated community. It also has an effect oncity cohesiveness, especially cohesion between its northern and southerncommunities.Wollongong is at a critical point in its development. It has gone through alengthy period of adjustment to the major contraction in employment in steelproduction and mining that occurred from the second half of the 1980s.A key to the future is creating a sustainable city, in all its dimensions – social,environmental and economic. We need to improve our environment, deal withkey social problems and ensure that we have a vibrant economy that isgenerating a faster rate of job growth and new opportunities for ourcommunity.From an economic perspective, an important part of being a sustainable citywill be to achieve growth in new industries. A key focus of the Wollongongdevelopment strategy must be on ‘smart’ growth covering advancedmanufacturing, metals and engineering, health and medical, education,information technology, other knowledge based services and creativeindustries.It is also important that Wollongong continues to play a broader role in theIllawarra and South Coast Regions. Wollongong is the regional capital andthis role needs to be continually strengthened over time in retail,entertainment and recreation.This will involve an investment in knowledge through innovation and researchand development, the establishment of new enterprises as well as ensuringthat key skills (including technical and trade skills) are available in thepopulation. Initiatives will be required to encourage the development of newsmall businesses.In shaping our future it will be important to manage and improve our naturalenvironment and our built environment. In planning for new growth, we needto take account of key environmental issues including: water availability,waste, energy and motor vehicle use.Wollongong Futures Plan A sustainable community can face the future with confidence because it has a secure and renewable supply of resources and a healthy environment, it has a vibrant regional economy that generates employment opportunities, and has a strong social fabric and active community life. This is a major focus of the long term vision for Wollongong.Wollongong Futures has developed a coherent 20 year vision for the City’sfuture.Sustainability is the defining feature at the core of the vision. The FuturesPlan is focused on Wollongong becoming a sustainable community. 2
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005This sustainability approach is holistic. It takes account of theinterrelationships between social factors, our environment and our economyin seeking to secure a balance and the best possible quality of life outcomesfor all our community.The Futures process has generated ten visions or strategic platforms, each ofwhich describes an aspect of life in Wollongong now and into the future.These visions came out of the Wollongong Futures community consultationprocess and were refined in the action planning stage of the project.These visions were further refined to be grouped under 4 strategy themes.Wollongong will be: a Living City, an Innovative City, A Connected City andan Inclusive City. The table below illustrates the visions developed by thecommunity under each strategy theme. 3
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Strategy Themes VisionsLiving City Developing a Wollongong will foster thriving urban areas progressive and with innovative development that is based quality urban on principles of design excellence and that environment for contributes to a strong sense of place throughout the local government area. people Developing Wollongong’s future vision includes the local development of vibrant local communities communities and cultures. Valuing and Wollongong will enjoy a natural environment sustaining the that is protected and enhanced, and a natural human environment that is designed and environment developed in harmony with nature. Enhancing our The lifestyle of the Wollongong community community’s will be influenced by the natural, cultural and lifestyle recreational assets of the areaInnovative City Supporting and Wollongong will have a flourishing and developing the sustainable economy with an increasing regional number of employment opportunities economy developed in the local government area. Embracing Wollongong will be a vibrant, contemporary creativity and local government area which protects, cultural identity enhances and celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, creativity and originality.Connected City Facilitating and Wollongong will have a well-planned, integrating coordinated and clean transport system that movement links the City to Sydney, to other regional centres and that provides access to all relevant localities within the local government area in a safe, convenient and affordable manner Access to high Wollongong will have a high quality speed tele- telecommunications network, which provides communications fast links for business and the community to the digital world.Inclusive City Access, equity, Wollongong will be a local government area utility that will be accessible on all levels to the whole community. In the future, Wollongong will consider access, equity and utility in all that it does and strives to achieve. Council and Wollongong will have an involved community community working in partnership with an accessible, partnership in responsive and accountable Council that city governance provides dynamic and proactive leadership to the local government area. 4
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005A Practical FrameworkThe Futures Plan outlines the community’s aspirations and sets the directionsfor policy across a wide range of categories. It aims to secure a better futurefor Wollongong, one that is based on the principles of sustainability.Progress is well underway in a number of major areas of policy, for examplein environment policies and programs and in planning for a revitalised CentralCity Area.The Futures Plan will guide Council’s long term Strategic Plans and itsCorporate Plan. It will also impact on the various planning instruments, suchas the Local Environmental Plan (LEP) and Development Control Plans,which will influence the future shape of Wollongong and its communities. ThePlan will also set the broad directions that will impact on future budgetdecisions.The Futures Plan also has relevance to the actions of the other tiers ofgovernment and other organisations within the LGA.The Futures Plan is a living plan, and performance will be tracked andmonitored on a regular basis, with adjustments being made to take account ofchanged circumstances and emerging opportunities.Monitoring ProgressIn this respect it will be important to identify outcomes and to measureprogress against the major elements of the Futures Plan. This tracking,measurement and regular review of strategies will ensure that the Planremains relevant and can be adjusted to reflect changes in circumstancesand new opportunities.This tracking will involve establishing measures for each of the 4 Future Citythemes and reviewing the core strategies on a regular basis. The mediumterm nature of many of the initiatives means that some of the strategies wouldbe reviewed every 5 years. Others would be examined more frequently.Building PartnershipsThe Plan, along with the detailed research and analysis that has beenundertaken, provides a strong foundation for seeking support from all levelsof government. It also provides a basis for regional cooperation andpartnering on key issues affecting our future.The implementation of major elements of the plan will require partnershipsbetween Council, other levels of government, business, the community andother key stakeholder groups. While the leadership of these coalitions willvary, it will be important for Council to play an active role at all times.Taking ActionA proactive program to influence government (State and National) onstrategic planning, the environment, infrastructure, economic development,social well-being and other key issues will be an important part of realisingour visions for Wollongong.Wollongong needs to be highly visible to both the State Government and theFederal Government on a wide range of issues that affect the future of ourCity. For example many of the components of Wollongong’s economicdevelopment strategy will require changes in government policy, governmentsupport for major infrastructure development, or funding for specificprograms. The same is true in many other areas of policy which impact onquality of life in Wollongong. 5
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005The Futures Plan recognises that a number of the actions required to realisethe visions are already well underway - some are part of ongoing initiatives byCouncil, others are at the research and planning stages, while some othersare still on the drawing board. Some outcomes will be realised in the shortterm, while others will require a medium to long term period to achieve.Fully realising the visions will also require sustained and planned activitiesover the long term.The success of the Futures Plan is dependent on securing wide support fromthe community and stakeholders for its core visions and its key elements.Obtaining this support will require communicating the plan to the communityand seeking endorsements from key stakeholders. It also requires continuingthe engagement with the community that was established during theinvestigation stage of the futures process.Wollongong City Council is committed to the Futures Plan. It will establishinternal mechanisms to manage implementation and an external advisorygroup to oversee the Plan.Wollongong is now in a position to shape a positive sustainable future. 6
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005ContentsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................... 1CONTENTS........................................................................................................................... 71 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................... 92 THE WOLLONGONG FUTURES PROCESS ........................................................ 11 2.1 WOLLONGONG FUTURES ........................................................................................ 11 2.2 THE PROCESS ......................................................................................................... 12 2.2.1 Steps in the Process....................................................................................... 12 2.2.2 Active Community Consultation .................................................................... 13 2.2.3 Research and Analysis................................................................................... 14 2.2.4 From Visions to Action.................................................................................. 14 2.3 GUIDING PRINCIPLES ............................................................................................. 153 WOLLONGONG – PRESENT AND FUTURE ....................................................... 17 3.1 WOLLONGONG NOW .............................................................................................. 17 3.1.1 State of the City ............................................................................................. 18 3.1.2 Regional Role – Illawarra and South Coast.................................................. 21 3.1.3 Relationship with Sydney Metropolitan Area ................................................ 21 3.2 WOLLONGONG’S FUTURE ...................................................................................... 22 3.2.1 Outlook.......................................................................................................... 22 3.2.2 Key Future Drivers........................................................................................ 24 3.2.3 The Challenges We Face............................................................................... 25 3.3 SHAPING OUR FUTURE ........................................................................................... 26 3.3.1 Sydney Metropolitan Strategy ....................................................................... 26 3.3.2 Illawarra Regional Strategy .......................................................................... 27 3.3.3 Wollongong Strategy ..................................................................................... 284 THE FUTURE VISION.............................................................................................. 29 4.1 WOLLONGONG 2025– A SUSTAINABLE CITY ......................................................... 29 4.1.1 Defining a Sustainable City........................................................................... 29 4.1.2 Local Action on the Environment.................................................................. 30 4.1.3 A Framework for Decisions .......................................................................... 30 4.2 STRATEGY DIRECTIONS ......................................................................................... 31 4.2.1 Visions for the City........................................................................................ 31 4.3 LIVING CITY .......................................................................................................... 33 4.3.1 Developing a Progressive and Quality Urban Environment for People 34 4.3.2 Developing Local Communities ................................................................ 35 4.3.3 Valuing and Sustaining the Environment ................................................ 36 4.3.4 Enhancing our Communitys Lifestyle...................................................... 37 4.4 INNOVATIVE CITY .................................................................................................. 38 4.4.1 Supporting and Developing the Regional Economy.............................. 38 4.4.2 Embracing Creativity and Cultural Identity.............................................. 40 4.5 CONNECTED CITY .................................................................................................. 41 4.5.1 Facilitating and Integrating Movement..................................................... 42 4.5.2 Access to High Speed Telecommunications .......................................... 42 4.6 INCLUSIVE CITY ..................................................................................................... 43 4.6.1 Access Equity and Utility .............................................................................. 43 4.6.2 Council and Community Partnership in City Governance............................ 445 REALISING OUR FUTURE ..................................................................................... 46 5.1 VISIONS INTO ACTION ............................................................................................ 46 5.1.1 Setting Directions.......................................................................................... 46 5.1.2 Taking Action ................................................................................................ 46 5.2 KEY ROLES ............................................................................................................ 47 5.2.1 Council .......................................................................................................... 47 7
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 5.2.2 Partners......................................................................................................... 48 5.2.3 Community .................................................................................................... 49 5.3 FROM STRATEGY TO OUTCOMES............................................................................ 506 LIVING CITY ............................................................................................................. 51 6.1 LIVING CITY OVERVIEW ........................................................................................ 51 6.2 DEVELOPING A PROGRESSIVE AND QUALITY URBAN ENVIRONMENT .................... 52 6.3 VALUING AND SUSTAINING THE ENVIRONMENT .................................................... 55 6.4 DEVELOPING STRONG LOCAL COMMUNITIES ........................................................ 60 6.5 ENHANCING OUR COMMUNITY’S LIFESTYLE.......................................................... 637 INNOVATIVE CITY.................................................................................................. 64 7.1 INNOVATIVE CITY OVERVIEW................................................................................ 64 7.2 SUPPORTING THE REGIONAL ECONOMY ................................................................. 65 7.3 EMBRACING CREATIVITY AND CULTURAL IDENTITY ............................................. 728 CONNECTED CITY .................................................................................................. 75 8.1 CONNECTED CITY OVERVIEW ................................................................................ 759 INCLUSIVE CITY...................................................................................................... 78 9.1 INCLUSIVE CITY OVERVIEW................................................................................... 78 9.2 ACCESS EQUITY UTILITY ....................................................................................... 79 9.3 COUNCIL AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP............................................................. 8210 THE WAY FORWARD.......................................................................................... 84 10.1 ACTING ON OUR FUTURE ....................................................................................... 84 10.2 MEASURING PERFORMANCE .................................................................................. 84 10.2.1 Tracking Progress ......................................................................................... 84 10.2.2 Reviewing and Reporting .............................................................................. 84 10.2.3 Measures ....................................................................................................... 84 10.3 SECURING SUPPORT ............................................................................................... 88 10.4 MANAGING THE PLAN ............................................................................................ 88REFERENCES.................................................................................................................... 89 8
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20051 Introduction Looking to the Future Wollongong is a dynamic region with a rich history - a history that starts with our Indigenous landowners, and flows through white settlement, industrialisation, the impacts of post war immigration and a period of major change over the last two decades of the 20th Century.2 Wollongong has been ever evolving and changing in its setting and character - its population, culture, industry and economy. With a population of almost 190,000, Wollongong is now Australia’s ninth largest city. In the last decade we have moved from a city reliant on steelmaking, mining and heavy manufacturing, to a City of Innovation undergoing significant growth in areas such as advanced manufacturing, information technology, telecommunications, education and tourism. The City has a strong base in creative industries which will also provide future opportunities for growth. Change is continuing as people, business and investment are being attracted to Wollongong and the lifestyle that it offers. Within this environment of growth, we also recognise the crucial importance of protecting those natural assets which make our region unique and attractive, in particular the escarpment, our coastline and waterways and our other natural and human assets. The City of Wollongong is now looking to its future. The Wollongong community has mapped out a new future for its region and for its people. The Wollongong Futures Plan embodies the approach that we will take as a community to achieve sustainable outcomes for the City and its people, for the environment and for the local economy. Wollongong Futures The Futures Plan is broad in its scope and impact, but at the heart of the Plan is our desire to develop a sustainable region. "In the Year 2025, Wollongong will be a sustainable local government area, safeguarding the economic, social, cultural and environmental well-being of present and future generations." Wollongong Futures is a strategic planning initiative that has helped us as a community to think about the future we want, to develop a shared vision, and to plan how to achieve it. The process has enabled us to determine the way we would like to see the City of Wollongong evolve over the next 20 years, and to identify the things we need to do to shape that future. The development of the plan has been comprehensive in its approach. We have looked closely at all the dimensions of Wollongong as it is now, and have assessed its future potential. We have examined the economic, social, and environmental factors that will shape our future. We have looked at ways in which we govern and involve our community. The futures review has been extensive. We have drawn on a wide range of research and analysis that has examined fundamental issues impacting on Wollongong’s future. At the same time we have involved our community2 The name Wollongong originated from the aboriginal word Woolyungah meaning ‘Five Islands’. 9
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005extensively in thinking about Wollongong’s future and how they want theirown communities to evolve.It is all part of the most comprehensive futures process initiated by any city inAustralia.The product of this work is a long term plan that will shape the future for theentire Wollongong Local Government Area. The Futures Plan provides avisionary framework for planning which works towards sustainabledevelopment in relation to our economy, our environment and the social well-being of our community.This report takes the futures analysis to its final stage by combining the keyresearch findings with the community inputs, in order to shape an operationalstrategy that links key outcomes and actions.Focusing on Outcomes The focus of the Plan is on delivering real outcomes that will shape our future and ensure that we are improving the quality of life of all our citizens.The Futures Plan is not just a plan for Wollongong City Council and its ownactivities. The Plan is a comprehensive long term vision for Wollongong.Within its scope are desired outcomes that will require actions by governmentat all levels - state and national, and actions by business and the community.As a Council, we will be working hard to secure the involvement ofgovernment (state and national), business and other regional stakeholders indelivering the plan.The adoption of the Wollongong Futures Plan means that we now have aholistic and long term perspective on the initiatives that are needed to createa strong future for Wollongong. As such it will be one of the major long termdirectional documents that will help guide some of the other detailedstrategies, plans and actions that are implemented by Council and other keystakeholders.The Wollongong Futures Plan is a living document. It is designed so that thevisions are re-visited every 5 years, reviewed and updated to reflect changingdemographics, new community needs and emerging opportunities. We willtrack achievements and outcomes on an ongoing basis, through Council’sStrategic Plan and its Corporate Plan Wollongong City Council is working hard to ensure Wollongong, “the City of Innovation”, grows as an attractive, progressive, inclusive city which follows the best practices in urban design, while also recognising, maintaining and restoring our many natural assets. 10
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20052 The Wollongong Futures Process2.1 Wollongong Futures The underlying principles of Wollongong Futures are sustainability (secure and renewable resources, a strong social fabric and a healthy environment) and inclusiveness (a system of involved community governance, encouraging participation, communication and coordination). The Wollongong Futures Project came about through community identification of the need to establish a vision for the City of Wollongong and an expressed desire for Council to commit to genuine community consultation and involvement in decisions affecting our city. Wollongong Futures is a strategic planning initiative of Wollongong City Council involving the community in a visioning process. The wider community was asked to consider the future it wants for Wollongong, so that a shared vision and proactive plan to achieve it could be developed. The exercise sought the input of people with wide ranging backgrounds and views, working in the spirit of seeking consensus. The final stage is the translation of the wider community aspirations for the future of Wollongong into an action plan that is specific, relevant, measurable, achievable, and supported by the allocation of funding and specific time frames. The Wollongong Futures Project was linked to a major long term strategic planning initiative, the need to review the Wollongong Local Environmental Plan (LEP).3 The LEP sets the parameters for long term strategic land use planning, and has benefited from the comprehensive analysis and consultation that were at the core of the Futures Process. At the outset, a series of clear aims were set for the Futures Project. The aims of Wollongong Futures were to: • Establish a vision based on the principles of sustainability and inclusiveness to take Wollongong into the future; • Formulate an implementation plan to achieve the vision; and • Establish a monitoring and reporting process to evaluate progress. To achieve these aims, the Wollongong Futures process was required to meet the following objectives: • Create an overarching plan that will drive subsequent strategies and plans; • Acknowledge the changing character of the City and proactively plan for it; • Identify a range of key issues and subsequent strategies; • Facilitate participation in all sectors (community, political and inter- agency); • Identify and build on community values; • Create general common ownership of plans, among key groups and stakeholders;3 The current plan was the Wollongong LEP 1990 and was formulated in the late 1980’s. The newWollongong LEP is being developed, with the Futures process being a major input. 11
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 • Design and implement (contribute to) a decision support system; • Develop indicators to measure progress; and • Develop a reporting system that will flow back into the strategic plan. These aims and objectives were achieved through a comprehensive process of research and analysis and community engagement. This report takes the futures analysis to its final stage by incorporating all of the key research findings with the community inputs and aspirations, in order to outline an operational strategy that includes key actions. 2.2 The Process2.2.1 Steps in the Process A major strength of the Wollongong Futures Plan is the active participation in the planning process by key stakeholders. This has enabled the development of a series of collective visions for the future of our City, and a series of actions that promote sustainability. There were a number of steps in the process and these involved extensive research, consultation and community involvement. The process followed was based on the Oregon Model4, which was expanded to meet the specific needs of Wollongong. The Wollongong Futures project had five phases, each of which asked one of the following questions: • Phase 1: Knowledge Building - Where are we now? • Phase 2: Knowledge Building - Where are we going? • Phase 3: Visioning - Where do we want to be? • Phase 4: Action Planning -How do we get there? • Phase 5: Monitoring - How are we going? As its starting point, a Community Values Survey5 was commissioned to identify what the people of Wollongong considered to be the strengths and weaknesses of the region and issues of importance for the City. A comprehensive review was undertaken of existing research and strategies that related to long term development of the region. Some special research was also commissioned on aspects of the regional economy and its future. Work was also undertaken on issues related to the revitalisation of the Wollongong city centre. The next step involved the CSIRO leading a series of visioning workshops with key stakeholders including residents, community groups, government agencies, the business community, Council staff and Councillors.64 The Oregon Model is a futures analysis framework that has 4 steps – Community Profile, TrendStatement, Vision Statement and Action Plan. See Ames, Steven C (Ed), A Guide to CommunityVisioning ( American Planning Association, Washington DC, 1998) P 95 Wollongong Futures: Community Values Survey IRIS Research June 20026 The work was undertaken by the Urban and Regional Futures Group of CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems. Workshops wereheld in 9 locations across the LGA. A comprehensive report was produced on the Workshop results. Wollongong Futures:Community, Thematic and Council Visioning Workshops – Results and Analysis CSIRO 2003 12
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 A Community Advisory Group (CAG) was established to develop and refine the visions further and ensure that the outcomes were representative of the work undertaken by the community visioning sessions. Action Planning workshops were conducted with the CAG and key stakeholders in order to translate the visions into specific actions that could be measured and tracked over time. Potential lead and partnering roles were identified in this context in terms of implementation of major initiatives. A sustainability workshop was conducted as part of this stage in order to ensure that proposed initiatives were in line with principles of sustainability. The following diagram summarises the process. Futures Process2.2.2 Active Community Consultation A major strength of the futures process was its comprehensiveness and its capacity to engage a wide range of stakeholders during its different stages. Community consultation comprised a series of visioning, action planning and sustainability workshops, and the activities of the Community Advisory Group (CAG). The workshops conducted by CSIRO were held throughout the city and enabled residents to express their views, to identify key issues affecting their individual communities and the whole Wollongong LGA, and to communicate their visions and aspirations for the future development of Wollongong. Workshops were also held with key stakeholders including community groups, government agencies, the business community, Council staff and Councillors. 13
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Starting from the Community Values Survey, workshop participants identified issues important to our future, community values and the trends influencing the City’s development. Linkages were identified between the issues, and all this information was combined and articulated as visions for Wollongong.7 The Community Advisory Group (CAG) ensured continuing community involvement in the project. The role and scope of the CAG was to: • Represent the community (including stakeholders) throughout the process; • Provide strategic direction and ideas to the project by actively participating in the various input workshop sessions developing the Visions and Action Plan; • Review the outcomes of each of the key stages in the program; • Approve the final product on behalf of the community (including stakeholders); • Ensure that planning is followed through with actions and that the plan is implemented; and • Provide links and feedback to the wider community.2.2.3 Research and Analysis As part of the process a wide range of research was commissioned to investigate key elements of the city’s future. Core reports that were part of the Futures Process included the Community Values Survey conducted by IRIS (June 2002), Regional Economy Overview, Leyshon Consulting (June 2002); Community, Thematic and Council Visioning Workshops – Results and Analysis, CSIRO (2003) and the Economic Development Road Map prepared by Buchan Consulting (November 2003). At the same time the project was also able to draw on and analyse a wide range of other research that was available. This included reports that were commissioned outside of the Futures Process by the New South Wales Government and others. The use of this research ensured that there was a strong empirical foundation for the future visions and actions that have been developed.82.2.4 From Visions to Action A summary of the Futures Vision was produced in late 2003 in a short report.9 This report outlined the elements of the vision and was the foundation for the Action Planning Phase of the Strategy. The Action Planning Phase concentrated on the identification and development of specific actions that would need to be undertaken to work towards our goal of a Sustainable City. As part of this process, potential partnerships required to translate visions into reality, were identified. Identified were partnerships between Wollongong7 Wollongong Futures: Community, Thematic and Council Visioning Workshops – Results and Analysis20038 Some of the reports included Wollongong City Structure Plan: Economic Analysis August 2003, HillPDA; Wollongong Cultural Industries Audit, Illawarra Regional Development Board 2000; WollongongEconomic Development Roadmap, Buchan Consulting November 2003. Cultural Policy Framework andCultural Plan 1998-2003, Wollongong City Council November 1998; Social Community Plan 02/03-05/06,Wollongong City Council.9 Futures – A Vision for Wollongong 2020, Wollongong City Council August 2003. 14
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 City Council and other levels of government, non-government organisations, community groups, business and industry groups, and residents. It was recognised by all involved that some of these actions could be implemented in the short term, while many others would be longer term initiatives. A comprehensive suite of actions emerged after close to 2 years of extensive consultation covering the development of visions, the identification of actions and the defining of desired outcomes to achieve a sustainable city. These outcomes and actions are outlined later in this report. As an important part of the action planning stage of Wollongong Futures, a workshop was held to review our actions and outcomes in line with the principles of Sustainability and our desire to be a sustainable City by 2025. The Community Advisory Group later reconvened to review and sign off on final actions for the Wollongong Futures Plan 2025.2.3 Guiding Principles Underpinning the vision for Wollongong and the Futures Plan are a set of guiding principles and values: • Our People: each person is equal and has a positive contribution to make. The rights and opinions of all are heard, valued and respected. • Innovation: solving problems in creative, flexible and an imaginative way to meet the diverse needs of the community and build a better and sustainable community. • Diversity and Inclusiveness: valuing differences that enrich our community and the positive contributions everyone can make in improving the quality of community life. • Accessibility: removing barriers that encourage social and economic prosperity and equality of opportunity for all. • Equity: integrity, fairness and justice. • Planning: sound planning to anticipate future needs and to provide direction that leads to positive and sustainable outcomes. • Community Participation: formation of interactive partnerships in the spirit of mutual growth and development, by the sharing of resources, skill and expertise, knowledge and enthusiasm. • Communication and Consultation: that is open, honest, culturally appropriate and undertaken with integrity to enable informed decision making. • Preservation: protection of natural environment and community assets, and respect for the sustainable use of our precious resources. • Strategic Risk Management: evaluation of risks and long term benefits to the community, and accountability for management of resources • Leadership: development of leaders to strengthen and enhance community outcomes. 15
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005The Wollongong Futures Plan is a directional plan that will help guide someof the other detailed strategies, plans and actions that are implemented byboth Council and other key stakeholders.Partnerships will be vital to the achievement of the vision for Wollongong.Just as it has taken the combined efforts of individuals, community groups,the business community, state government agencies and Council to imagineour future to this point, the actions emerging from this process will belong tomore than just Wollongong City Council. Indeed, everyone will have a role toplay.One outcome we are anticipating is that the community’s vision can bereflected in coordinated approaches between Council and other governmentand non government agencies, committing resources more efficiently andworking together for a common cause in order to create the future we desire. 16
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20053 Wollongong – Present and Future 3.1 Wollongong Now 17
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20053.1.1 State of the City Structure Wollongong LGA has a unique structure. It is a linear city with urban development concentrated within a relatively narrow coastal strip between the Illawarra Escarpment and the Pacific Ocean. The LGA stretches for around 70 kms along the coast. The proportion of urban land increases toward the southern half of the city with the northern suburbs characterised by limited development and restricted future development potential. The pattern of land use throughout the Wollongong LGA reflects the impact of geography, land constraints and Council’s Local Environment Plan (LEP). This unique structure has lead to the development of several distinct areas of settlement to the North and South of the Wollongong City Centre. This includes residential clusters in Unanderra, Warrawong and Dapto in the South, and at Corrimal and Thirroul to the North. As well as impacting on residential areas, the structure of the LGA has also influenced the location of manufacturing, retail and service employment. The pattern of development has also been affected by Port Kembla and by the large tract of land occupied by the steelworks. There is a strong concentration of jobs in and around the Wollongong City Centre, with most of the higher level service employment located there.10 The steelworks and industrial areas adjacent to the Port account for a substantial part of manufacturing related jobs. There are a series of retail centres located at Thirroul, Corrimal, Figtree, Warrawong and Dapto. These areas also include a range of local service businesses. Social Issues From a social perspective, the unique geography impacts on the accessibility of community and cultural facilities and the number of local facilities needed to serve an elongated community. It also has an effect on city cohesiveness, especially cohesion between its northern and southern communities. Like many cities around the world, Wollongong is in a transition period from traditional industries to a more diverse economy. The changes also generate some significant social issues. These include: • Economic impacts (unemployment, closure of traditional industries etc); • Demographic trends (increasing gentrification, ageing population, and diversity); • Changing social needs for persons who are disadvantaged (including housing, education, community services needs); and • Social problems (including local crime, drug use). The unemployment rate in Wollongong has declined from almost 14% in 1991 to 9% in 2001. The current unemployment rate in Wollongong (September 2004) is 8.0%, a decline from 9.4% a year earlier. However the10 Recent analysis by Buchan Consulting shows that almost 50% of jobs are located in an area thatincludes the Wollongong City Centre and the immediate adjacent areas in the north, south and west ofthe City. Economic Analysis of the Wollongong Central City Area Volume 1 Report, Buchan ConsultingDecember 2004 18
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 rate still remains around 2.5 percentage points above the NSW unemployment rate. Unemployment rates are high among young people and there is evidence of withdrawal of older workers (55+ years) from the workforce and considerable under-employment. These persistent unemployment rates present major social challenges for the future. A major continuing focus for the future must be on addressing these social problems. Wollongong City Council has developed a comprehensive Social Community Plan which focuses on those groups in the community with special needs.11 These include: children and families, young people, older people, people with disabilities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Council works in partnership with government agencies and non government organisations to develop and implement programs that meet the needs of these groups. The Environment Wollongong has a unique natural environment that includes the Escarpment, coast, waterways and Lake Illawarra. It is also a major centre for heavy industry, with associated challenges related to ongoing environmental management and improvement and the rehabilitation of industrial sites. Wollongong City Council has taken a lead on environmental issues and a number of environmental strategies are being implemented currently. A strong continuing focus on the environment must be a major element of Wollongong’s future. There are major opportunities to develop new employment in environmental industries. There are possibilities to create “green jobs” through activities including environmental education; research into biodiversity in the escarpment, ocean and waterways; environmental management and rehabilitation; and bush care. Given our unique natural environment, the development of eco-tourism initiatives is another potential area of growth. The Economy Wollongong is at a critical point in its development. It has gone through a lengthy period of adjustment to the major contraction in employment in steel production and mining that occurred from the second half of the 1980s. The recent analysis by Hill PDA for the Wollongong Futures project highlighted the major changes in employment patterns. These can be summarised as: a decline in mining and manufacturing employment; a growth in services (retail, health and community services) and knowledge based employment (including higher education, business services, creative industries)12; a net decline in employment opportunities, which has generated a dramatic increase in numbers commuting to Sydney for work; an increasing emphasis on higher order skills and experience, which in turn has reduced opportunities for entry-level workers; and an increase in the participation of 11 Social Community Plan 02/03-05/06, Wollongong City Council.12 There has been significant growth in employment in education, which reflects the continued development of the University ofWollongong. 19
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 women in the workforce and the numbers in part-time and casual work.13 The analysis of industry and employment by Buchan confirms these trends.14 These changes in employment structure are significant and are highlighted when 15 year comparisons are made. Manufacturing’s share of employment has declined from 27.3% in 1986 to 15.2% in 2001. Property and Business Services increased its share of employment from 4.8% to over 10%. Education and Health and Community Services both had major increases in employment. Labour force characteristics have changed in line with these new patterns of activity. These include: the skill level of the workforce has increased as reflected in the percentage of the workforce with university and other post secondary education qualifications; a changing occupational profile, with an increase in professionals and managers, a decline in industrial occupations and a substantial increase in clerical and administrative occupations. While the growth in qualifications held by the workforce has been significant, Wollongong qualification levels are still below those of the Sydney metropolitan area on most indicators. Current trends in regional population growth, residential development and the shifts in the employment base are changing the nature of Wollongong and are generating new demands for services and facilities. A positive employment trend for Wollongong has been the growth in services employment, particularly the growth in knowledge economy activities.15 Wollongong is well placed to become a centre for the development of these knowledge based industries. The presence of the University of Wollongong is a major asset for the region and provides a foundation for future growth, particularly in research and development, through the development of the Innovation Campus. Importance of Small Business Small businesses play an important role in Wollongong. There are only a relatively small number of large employers, with 68% of businesses in the LGA employing less than 5 people.16 While this size pattern is broadly consistent with other regional areas, the development of small business will be an important consideration for future jobs growth. This is particularly the case in an environment where there is unlikely to be any significant increases in employment in large organisations in Wollongong. This situation places a major focus on future initiatives that can encourage growth in existing small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and on creating an entrepreneurial culture that generates the formation of new businesses. An environment of innovation and business growth will generate new opportunities (across a wide spectrum including services, manufacturing and environmental industries), enable the retention of our brightest young graduates, develop the skills of young people and attract creative professionals.13 Wollongong City Structure Plan: Economic Analysis August 2003. Hill PDA P1114 Wollongong Economic Development Roadmap, Buchan Consulting November 200315 The knowledge economy is a term used to describe the newly emerging telecommunications/information technology/ creative cultural content sectors. It also includes higher education (teaching andresearch), business services and finance.16 Wollongong Economic Development Roadmap, Buchan Consulting November 2003 P 39. For adetailed analysis of businesses in the City Centre, including employment size see Economic Analysis ofthe Wollongong Central City Area Volume 1 Report, Buchan Consulting December 2004. 20
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Culture Wollongong has a strong cultural base which provides a foundation for future development. Cultural industries include businesses and organisations that are engaged in the production and sale of cultural products and services such as film and television / multi-media, music and entertainment, art and crafts, design (graphic, industrial, fashion), museums and galleries, indigenous arts, publishing, advertising and architecture. The University and its partnership with Wollongong City Council, also provide the opportunity to enhance the Citys cultural industries.3.1.2 Regional Role – Illawarra and South Coast Wollongong is the major population centre in the Illawarra Region and dominates the broader region that includes the South Coast. With a population of 181,612 (in 2001) Wollongong accounts for 70% of the Illawarra region’s total population (259,511). Wollongong’s population is larger than the combined population of the South Coast Region. As well as being the major population centre, Wollongong is the key regional centre for manufacturing and for higher level services including business services, education and technical training, health services, and cultural and community facilities and services. Wollongong’s future is contingent on continuing as the “regional capital” for this broader region.3.1.3 Relationship with Sydney Metropolitan Area From an economic and social perspective it will be important that Wollongong does not become an “outer dormitory suburb” for Sydney. A diverse and vibrant local economy that is offering an increasing number of quality jobs is fundamental to the City’s future. The close proximity of Wollongong to the Sydney Metropolitan area is both an advantage and a constraint. Close proximity to Sydney means that a large number of people live in Wollongong and commute to jobs in the Sydney metropolitan area. It also means that students are able to travel daily to the University. There are some leakages from the region in terms of retail spending and entertainment and cultural spending.17 Proximity may also limit the capacity for some services to develop as they face competition from metropolitan based providers. Continuing pressures in the Sydney area also impact on Wollongong. Accelerating housing costs in metropolitan Sydney have meant that some people have moved into the Wollongong housing market, where house prices have been seen as more affordable. The changing coastal locational preferences of “baby boomers” make Wollongong an attractive location because of the quality of its coastal environment, housing affordability and access to Sydney.17 For example, the Wollongong Cultural Audit showed that 50% of cultural and recreational spending byWollongong residents is spent outside of the region, mainly in Sydney. 21
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Continued high residential prices, congestion factors and environmental pressures in Sydney will favour new housing development in the regions, including Wollongong. Housing development proposed for Wollongong will also have an impact on the future of the region. The developments at Calderwood and West Dapto are designed to provide additional affordable housing that is suitable for families. From a sustainable communities perspective the growth in population will increase the requirements for additional employment opportunities in the region. There will also be a requirement for enhanced cultural and social facilities and services, and a need to manage environmental impacts. I There are other pressures that will need to be carefully managed. Limited open space and land suitable for development will mean that strong conservation planning must be followed if the quality of life and natural environment are to be valued. Key issues including water availability, waste, energy and vehicle use need to be considered. 3.2 Wollongong’s Future3.2.1 Outlook Strengthening the Regional Role The outlook for the region is for continued population growth with Wollongong having a projected population of 206,600 persons by 2026.18 The long term rate of population growth in the adjacent coastal municipalities is even faster than in Wollongong, and they will increase their regional population share over the coming decades. However because of its size, Wollongong will still remain the dominant population centre. With the significant population change occurring in the region, it is fundamental to Wollongong’s future that it continues to play its broader regional role. Wollongong is the regional capital and this role needs to be strengthened over time. With the increased population growth in the adjacent municipalities, it will be important that the city reinvents itself and is able to become the regional hub for knowledge based services (including business services, finance, education, research and development, environmental industries) and health services. It also needs to be a vibrant centre for retail, entertainment and cultural industries. Actions will be required across a range of policy areas to strengthen Wollongong’s future as a major regional centre.18 The projections for population change between 1996 and 2026 are for: Wollongongs population toincrease by 23,100; Shellharbour’s population to increase by 25,700; Kiama’s population to increase by6,400. In the broader region, Shoalhaven’s population is expected to increase by 45,500. 22
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Building on Advantage Wollongong is now being recognised for its assets, as people are discovering its location, accessibility, environment and lifestyle.The following have been identified as key strengths of the area: • Location (proximity to Sydney); • Accessibility (established road, rail and port infrastructure providing links to national and export markets); • Deep water harbour; • Lifestyle (natural environment, housing quality and amenities); • Services (quality of education and health); • Availability of skilled and stable workforce with multi lingual ability; • Market size (large enough to support a range of business service providers ) and access to the Sydney market; and • Strong institutions (Wollongong University, TAFE and health and medical services).Wollongong residents are attuned to the environmental advantages of thearea, as reflected in a variety of community surveys. Quality of life and thenatural environment are major draw cards for an educated and creativeworkforce.Wollongong rates highly on some of the factors that influence relocationdecisions by business people and professionals.Wollongong is also viewed as having assets that make it a good place to setup and operate a business. The key advantages include: access to a skilledand stable workforce with multi-lingual ability; road, rail and port infrastructureproviding links to national and export markets; location within an hour of theSydney metropolitan market; and being a large enough area to support arange of business service providers.Wollongong needs to make the most of all of these advantages in the future.Constraints inhibiting the development of Wollongong relate to a perceivedlack of a coherent economic development strategy; inadequacy ofinfrastructure (central city, road, rail, telecommunications); limited availableindustrial land and higher quality commercial space; and concerns about theindustrial relations climate. Limited hotel and conference facilities are majorinhibitors to the business tourism market. The city centre is seen as requiringrefurbishment and revitalisation.To achieve its full potential, Wollongong will also need to tackle theseconstraints. 23
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20053.2.2 Key Future Drivers Wollongong does not exist in isolation and will be influenced by international, national and local trends. There are a number of factors that will be driving Wollongong’s future. These include: Population Factors • Regional population increase (including the development of West Dapto) and its effects on the demand for new housing and infrastructure. This population increase will provide a boost to the construction sector, while also increasing the demand for a wide range of services from retail through to education, health, culture and social. • An ageing population and its effects on the future pattern of demand for services (including health, community services, retail, recreation, cultural services). Development Trends • Revitalisation of the Wollongong City Centre and other centres within the local government area, including the conversion of “brown fields” sites from current industrial uses. • The Innovation Campus and the attraction of research and development centres to Wollongong. • Future development of the Port and its impact on support industries and manufacturing. • Improvements in regional transport and telecommunications infrastructure and their impacts on business, the community and the environment. • Pressures on resources and the need to make lasting improvements in the environment. Industry Trends • Global trends in core industries in the region including steel making and engineering industries and development of new export markets. • Technological change and its impact on industries in the region. • Impacts of business growth in the region on the demand for business services. • Continued growth in the creative industries. • Growth in tourism activity. • Importance of environmental factors and the development of environmental industries. 24
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20053.2.3 The Challenges We Face Securing a Balance Wollongong faces a number of future challenges. These include: • Managing and improving our environment – the natural environment and built environment; • Resolving social problems within the community; • Securing a higher rate of business and job growth in existing and emerging industries; and • Developing our cultural and community resources. The key challenge for the future is achieving a balance across these areas and securing growth that is sustainable in all its dimensions. Through active policies by Council, the State Government and other regional partners, there is the potential to meet these challenges and to create a new and vibrant future for Wollongong. An important part of being a sustainable city will be to achieve growth in new industries. At the same time a balance will be achieved with sustaining and improving our environment, both natural and built. Growing the Economy Wollongong faces a major economic challenge. The Buchan Report with its Economic Development Road Map identified 4 basic pillars of a long term development strategy for the region. These were: Growing the Economy, Changing the Place, Changing Attitudes, and Developing Skills. It also emphasises the need to integrate environmental, social and economic development policies. These pillars may be summarised as follows: Growing the economy – involves programs to expand markets of existing industries, developing new enterprises and attracting businesses and organisations to Wollongong. Changing the place – involves programs that improve the infrastructure for living and working including central city re-development, housing development, waterfront development and business infrastructure, land use planning, zoning and industrial land development, and developing local communities. Changing attitudes – involves marketing and communication programs designed to change external attitudes about Wollongong as a place to live, work and invest. It also includes initiatives to gain internal commitment to the future vision of Wollongong. Developing Skills – involves activities to build the skills base of the region through education, training and programs to develop an innovative culture that can support a knowledge based economy. The Road Map also identified the importance of the environment in the region – preserving and enhancing those aspects of the physical environment which contribute to the quality of life that Wollongong offers. 25
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 The Economic Road Map Growing the Economy • Business development • Business attraction • Industry clusters • Major projectsDeveloping Skills Outcomes Changing Attitudes• Knowledge economy Sustainable • Leadership• Innovation Jobs • Internal/external• Education Industry • Regional marketing• Training Investment Environment Improving the Place • Infrastructure • City centre redevelopment • Neighbourhood development • Industrial estates • Major development projects • Environmental projects •Sense of identity and distinctiveness 3.3 Shaping our Future Wollongong’s future is going to be shaped by the strategies and policies implemented by governments at all levels. These include the Sydney Metropolitan Strategy, Illawarra regional strategies, and strategies implemented by Wollongong City Council. 3.3.1 Sydney Metropolitan Strategy The future growth of Wollongong needs to be considered in the context of the Sydney Metropolitan Strategy. This is a strategy being developed for the Greater Metropolitan Region (GMR) of Sydney by the Department of Infrastructure Planning and Natural Resources (DIPNR) as part of a whole of government approach. The Greater Metropolitan Region (GMR) extends from Port Stephens in the north to Kiama in the south and has the Great Dividing Range running down its western edge. It comprises the Sydney region together with the Central Coast, the Lower Hunter and the Illawarra.19 19 Sydney Metropolitan Strategy Website www.metrostrategy.nsw.gov.au 26
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 The Greater Metropolitan Region had a population of 4.9 million people in 2001.20 The strategy is looking ahead for 30 years to enable planning of future housing, employment and infrastructure and to ensure sustainability in development. It will guide major decisions and plans by State and Local government and inform private sector investment. Elements of the Strategy which impact on Wollongong and the Illawarra Region include the Centres Policy and the development of Regional Strategies. The Centres Policy is a key part of Metropolitan Strategy. It focuses on ensuring that areas have an appropriate mix of homes, jobs, services (such as retail & recreation) and other activities. This is aimed at increasing the use of public transport, maximising the use of existing infrastructure and helping to generate local jobs.21 The NSW Government has identified seven centres in Sydneys west and four regional centres that form the basis of the Centres Policy.22 Wollongong is one of these centres. The strategies recognise that most of the employment growth will occur in services, with manufacturing growing but representing a declining share of jobs. The strategy also acknowledges that there are some significant development challenges in the regions. In the case of the Illawarra, the last areas for urban development have been identified as West Dapto and the Calderwood Valley. These areas require investment in infrastructure and are currently the subject of major planning activity.3.3.2 Illawarra Regional Strategy Wollongong plays a key role in the Illawarra region and also has an impact on the South Coast. As part of the GMR strategy, regional strategies are being developed by the State Government for the Illawarra, the Hunter Region and the Central Coast.23 These strategies recognise the complementary roles that the regions play to the Sydney metropolitan area, while at the same time recognising the need to strengthen the regions.24 These strategies take into account development trends, environmental issues, and the structure of the regional economies. Wollongong will be a major player in the development of the Illawarra Regional Strategy.20 Metropolitan Sydney is almost 80 per-cent of the population of the GMR, or 3.8 million people. TheCentral Coast (approx 300,000 people) and Illawarra (approx 270,000 people) are closely tied to Sydney,each with a little over five percent of the total GMR population. Lower Hunter has around 10 percent orapproximately 490,000 people.21 Planning for a Better Future, Discussion Paper, Sydney Greater Metropolitan Region , DIPNRSeptember 2004 P322 The regional centres are Wyong, Gosford, Wollongong and Newcastle. The metropolitan centres inWestern Sydney are: Fairfield, Bankstown, Parramatta, Blacktown, Penrith, Campbelltown and Liverpool.23 These strategies are being developed by the Department of Infrastructure Planning and NaturalResources with input from local government. These strategies will be completed during 200524 Planning for a Better Future, Discussion Paper, Sydney Greater Metropolitan Region , DIPNRSeptember 2004 P12 27
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20053.3.3 Wollongong Strategy This Wollongong Futures Report sets the framework for strategies to improve Wollongong and its long term prospects. The vision for the future and the actions required are outlined in the remainder of this report. Improving our future requires a mix of policies covering: land use planning, environmental management, infrastructure development; services provision, economic development and social policies. Environmental considerations must also be important parts of the Illawarra Regional Plan and the Sydney Metropolitan Strategy. Implementing the strategies to realise Wollongong’s future is not just the province of Council, but rather it involves partnerships with business, government agencies and other key stakeholders. However Council representing its community needs to provide the leadership to bring all the elements of these strategies together. 28
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054 The Future Vision 4.1 Wollongong 2025– A Sustainable City The following summarises what Wollongong would be like in 2025. Vision for 2025 Wollongong is a sustainable community, with people who are active, healthy and content. We all feel safe and connected to others. We enjoy a range of lifestyles and people. Environmentally responsible businesses are supported and successful. All our waste is turned into resources. A green network will connect the escarpment and the sea, connecting our everyday lives with the natural world. People are able and willing to participate in city issues and feel they can make a difference. There are high levels of community involvement, people respect the views of others and are proud to live in the City of Wollongong. Our management of water and energy resources is cutting edge and our air quality supports good health. Wollongong has connected public transport and communication systems that provide fast, effective services to the whole city. It is integrated, environmentally responsible and ground-breaking in its design. Our town centres are thriving places to live, work and play. Public facilities and places teem with people – the streets are alive and vibrant.4.1.1 Defining a Sustainable City A sustainable community can face the future with confidence because it has a secure and renewable supply of resources and a healthy environment, it has a vibrant regional economy that generates employment opportunities, and has a strong social fabric and active community life. This is a major focus of the long term vision for Wollongong. Wollongong Futures has developed a coherent vision for the City’s future. Sustainability is the defining feature at the core of the vision for this future, with the Futures Plan focused on Wollongong becoming a sustainable community. This sustainability approach is holistic and takes account of the interrelationships between economic, environmental and social factors in seeking to secure a balance and the best possible quality of life outcomes for all of our community. Sustainability is about living within our means. It involves managing our use of resources and balancing environmental, economic and social outcomes. An integrated approach to sustainability must take account of Wollongongs investment in social and cultural capital including the viability of its community relationships and values. Achieving this balance is often referred to as the Triple Bottom Line. When corporate governance is added to the equation we have what is called the Quadruple Bottom Line. 29
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 The focus of sustainability is on ensuring a healthy, productive, and meaningful life for all our residents, both present and future. A city is becoming more sustainable if it is reducing its resource input (land, energy, water, material) and its waste outputs (gases, liquids, solid wastes) while simultaneously increasing its liveability (health, employment, community activity, leisure activities, public spaces, land, pedestrian accessibility).4.1.2 Local Action on the Environment Sustainability issues have been recognised at a global level. The UN Agenda 21 plan outlined the steps local governments can take to achieve sustainability. The plan called for a "Local Agenda 21 Plan" to be prepared by all local governments. The 1992 Rio Earth Summit coined the phrase "think globally, act locally". The Local Agenda 21 Plan aims to establish processes at the local government level that will serve to integrate economic, social and environment considerations into decision making. The main aim is to involve all levels of the local community in decision making and action, and in so doing translate the principles of sustainability into strategies and projects that are meaningful for those specific communities. The uptake and inclusion of sustainability into local communities and governments has been slow and as a result the United Nations Earth Summit in Johannesburg in 2002 took a more aggressive approach. It moved to change from planning to action and the new term is Local Action 21. It has called for all governments to prepare definitive action plans to ensure on ground works are achieved to deliver an accelerated implementation of sustainability25. Sustainability issues have been recognised as important in Wollongong, with Wollongong City Council being active on all aspects of environmental issues through the development of environmental action plans, completion of a number of audits and implementation of a wide range of environmental programs.4.1.3 A Framework for DecisionsThere are a number of aspects of decision making within this sustainabilityframework. These include: • Considerate and careful – ensuring decisions have had a full assessment of options, based on the best available knowledge while still recognising the gaps in our knowledge and adopting a precautionary approach. • Holistic – recognising the interdependence between society, the economy, the environment and between the systems within council. • Innovative – seeking new and creative ways of reaching objectives. • Forward looking – recognising that today’s actions will affect the future safety of people. • Outward looking – recognising that Wollongong is part of a larger region and nation, and developing strategic partnerships with other organisations.25 The methodology used in the Wollongong Futures Process, the framework and the directions outlinedin this report are consistent with the Local Action 21 approach. 30
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 4.2 Strategy Directions4.2.1 Visions for the City The Futures process has generated ten visions or strategic platforms, each of which describes an aspect of the life in Wollongong now and into the future. These visions were developed through the Wollongong Futures community consultation process and were refined in the action planning stage of the project. These visions were further refined to be grouped under 4 strategy themes for Wollongong: • Living City – urban environment, local communities, natural environment policies, lifestyle • Innovative City - regional economy, cultural industries • Connected City – transport, telecommunications • Inclusive City – social plan, equity, governance, community engagement These themes take account of the 10 community visions (or focus areas) and link them together in a more coherent way. The four themes and what they cover are outlined in the table below. 31
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Strategy Visions Themes Living City Developing a Wollongong will foster thriving urban areas progressive and with innovative development that is based quality urban on principles of design excellence and that environment for contributes to a strong sense of place throughout the local government area. people Developing local Wollongong’s future vision includes the communities development of vibrant local communities and cultures. Valuing and Wollongong will enjoy a natural environment sustaining the that is protected and enhanced, and a natural environment human environment that is designed and developed in harmony with nature. Enhancing our The lifestyle of the Wollongong community community’s lifestyle will be influenced by the natural, cultural and recreational assets of the area Innovative City Supporting and Wollongong will have a flourishing and developing the sustainable economy with an increasing regional economy number of employment opportunities developed in the local government area. Embracing creativity Wollongong will be a vibrant, contemporary and cultural identity local government area which protects, enhances and celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, creativity and originality. Connected City Facilitating and Wollongong will have a well-planned, integrating coordinated and clean transport system that movement links the City to Sydney, to other regional centres and that provides access to all relevant localities within the local government area in a safe, convenient and affordable manner Access to high Wollongong will have a high quality speed telecommunications network, which provides telecommunications fast links for business and the community to the digital world. Inclusive City Access, equity, utility Wollongong will be a local government area that will be accessible on all levels to the whole community. In the future, Wollongong will consider access, equity and utility in all that it does and strives to achieve. Council and Wollongong will have an involved community community working in partnership with an accessible, partnership in city responsive and accountable Council that governance provides dynamic and proactive leadership to the local government area.The themes, policies and actions that are linked to each are discussed below. 32
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 4.3 Living City The Living City theme covers key elements of a sustainable city focusing on the natural environment, the built environment, local communities and access to lifestyle services. A core value embodied in a Living City is improving the quality of life for residents. A Living City is a dynamic city that places an emphasis on sustaining the environment, producing a quality living environment, developing safe local communities and delivering facilities and services that enhance an active lifestyle.LIVING CITY Vision Statements Sub Themes Some Key Activities (4)Developing a Wollongong will foster thriving urban - Progressive - Urban environment managementprogressive and areas with innovative development that environment - City Centre revitalisationquality urban is based on principles of design - Design excellence - Housing strategyenvironment for excellence and that contributes to a - Strong sense of place - Open space policiespeople strong sense of place throughout the - Quality built - Heritage policies local government area. environment - Places for community interaction and - Environmentally cultural activity sensitive planning - A planned city/suburb/ neighborhood hierarchy - Open space -High quality of lifeDeveloping local Wollongong’s future vision includes the -Safe communities - Community developmentcommunities development of vibrant local - Increasing accessibility - West Dapto development communities and cultures. - Facilitating interaction - - Local planning policies - A village feel - Place making - Planning communities - Precinct identity programs - Active place management - Community capacity buildingValuing and Wollongong will enjoy a natural - Protecting the natural - Escarpment Strategysustaining the environment that is protected and environment – - Coastal Strategynatural enhanced, and a human environment Designing a human - Lake Strategyenvironment that is designed and developed in environment - Environmental programs harmony with nature. - Managing the - Community education programs escarpment, lake and coast - Improving quality of life - Maintaining ecological integrityEnhancing our The lifestyle of the Wollongong - Improving recreational - Cultural Strategycommunity’s community will be influenced by the assets - Development of sports andlifestyle natural, cultural and recreational - Respecting the recreation facilities assets of the area natural - Facilities marketing environment - City centre promotion - Developing our cultural - Tourism development assets - Improving our sports assets Note: Key activities are illustrative of the type of actions that are included in each policy theme 33
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054.3.1 Developing a Progressive and Quality Urban Environment for People Wollongong will foster thriving urban areas with innovative development that is based on principles of design excellence and that contribute to a strong sense of place throughout the local government area. Wollongong will be known as a progressive local government area with a high quality and environmentally sustainable built environment and a thriving city centre, complemented by its suburban centres and neighbourhoods. A major emphasis will be placed on harmony with the natural environment. To create an innovative and thriving region, Wollongong will employ the latest technology and develop new ideas around urban (and suburban) development.26 Strong principles of design excellence combined with environmental sensitivity and cultural awareness will drive all development in the region. The celebration of heritage values, diverse cultures and the retention of open space will also contribute to a strong sense of place and identity throughout the urban environment. There will be strong engagement with the local community in visioning and designing distinctive precincts and active city centres. The challenge is to ensure that urban development takes account of: the city’s built and industrial heritage; its landscape, particularly the powerful presence of the escarpment and the ready access to the highly valued beach; the walkability, scale, history, cultural traditions and corner shop focus of many of the original villages; and the importance of good design and an attractive aesthetic. There are a number of dimensions to future planning and design of the urban environment. • “Smart” urban growth is the solution advocated by urban planners in response to concern about sprawling suburban development. This entails changing existing zones to encourage multiuse land development patterns that make it possible to work, shop, and go to school within walking distance of people’s homes, supported by a range of transport options. • Include open space and green corridors between areas of population concentrations. • Encourage physical activity through use of grid street patterns that provide a range of direct & alternate routes, rather than cul-de-sac street patterns that make journeys longer and may foster car dependency. • Ensure that the planning of areas provides opportunities for incidental physical activity – local shops to walk to in the suburb, walking distance to public transport, provision of welcoming and safe footpaths and cycle ways (i.e. designing communities around people rather than cars). • Provide measures that make walking safer - paved footpaths for the elderly and for prams, adequate lighting, developing and promoting walk- to-school programs, and reducing traffic speeds. • Social cohesion is associated with mental wellbeing. What is needed are places and spaces to come together as families and communities. Green spaces and facilities for cultural, sporting and spiritual development have26 These principles are being applied in the master planning process underway on West Dapto. 34
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 been shown to promote a greater sense of community, reduce violence, and improve mental health. • Undertake research to determine the impact that changes in the built environment can have on health. Traffic studies to ensure road capacity can support new growth and to assess the impacts that increasing numbers of cars have on air quality. • Build communities that will suit residents throughout the life cycle – not just focus on the needs of one group over another (eg. needs of young families and older persons must be met). • Encourage small businesses in local communities. Local businesses and services mean that people (especially elderly and less mobile) can walk there and interact with their neighbours. • Use local consultations to determine community preferred futures.4.3.2 Developing Local Communities Wollongong’s future vision includes the development of vibrant local communities. People place a high value on the quality of their neighbourhoods. They identify strongly with and have an interest in the pattern of development of their own local area. Local communities are places that reflect the local people who live in them, their character, atmosphere, heritage and vision. Most importantly, they are the places that people call home. Local communities (villages, neighbourhoods and other places such as the city centre) will be places that are safe, healthy and accessible, where people can identify, interact and connect with each other. With its cultural diversity and geographic spread, Wollongong has many neighbourhoods and places that already have their own distinct local village feel. Through strategic planning, project implementation and place management, Wollongong will foster and develop these local village neighbourhoods to the fullest potential. Wollongong City Council will encourage community capacity building projects and a celebration of our cultural diversity and creativity. In order to improve quality of life and to ensure that people on the streets feel secure and personally safe, cities must become more liveable places. Successful public spaces, in city centres as well as in the suburbs, are flexible and popular; they are seldom empty. Strategies encouraging diversity of use, at both night and daytime; public and private sector investment; conspicuous care and management; entertainment and variety of experience are the building blocks for 24 hour spaces for people. Community networks are also an important part of local communities. Councils must work with local communities to develop social capital by supporting community networks, civic participation and fostering a strong sense of community identity through cultural distinctiveness. 35
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 The shaping of a new community is taking place with the development of the master plan for the West Dapto land release. This area offers an ideal opportunity for the Council to plan development on environmental principles and to pilot innovative water, waste, transport, housing, energy and community projects.4.3.3 Valuing and Sustaining the Environment Wollongong will enjoy a natural environment that is protected and enhanced, and a human environment that is designed and developed in harmony with nature. Wollongong as a community recognises that it is part of the natural world, and is acutely aware of the value of preserving the environment upon which it depends. Wollongong is famous for its unique natural environment, in particular the escarpment, Lake Illawarra and the coastal areas. These three features are vital contributors to the quality of life of our community as the lifestyles of a large percentage of the population are either focused around or affected by them. As it develops, the City will take account of natural ecosystems in innovative ways that: improve water, air, and soil quality; protect and expand habitat for all forms of life; use resources such as energy, water and other materials efficiently and responsibly; minimise waste; and that respond to the issues posed by hazards such as bushfire, landslip, coastal processes and flooding. The focus of all of these activities is to continually improve the ecological integrity of the region and its natural assets. Protection of the environment will be provided in a way that serves the needs of people and communities as well as the environment. • In the future our escarpment will be free from weeds and pests, and visitors will be able to visit without damaging the eco-systems. A continuous green network of streams, bush and open space which joins the escarpment to the sea will provide fish, birds and wildlife with the range of habitats they need to survive and opportunities for people to enjoy the natural environment. The Council will encourage quality, well- designed medium density housing as a way to offer affordable housing while stopping urban sprawl into our natural areas. • In practical terms Wollongong needs to become more energy efficient and generate more energy from renewable resources. Council will complete a greenhouse gas emissions inventory for the city that will allow us to set a reduction target and decide on appropriate actions. Community involvement will be crucial to its success. • Council is working towards achieving zero waste to landfill by 2020. The plan addresses the collection, re-use, recycling and residual disposal of litter, domestic collection, and illegal dumping. It also contains targets for Council’s in-house waste management and education programs for residents. • Our waterways, including Lake Illawarra, will be carefully managed. An ongoing process of monitoring and review of environmental outcomes will be undertaken. 36
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054.3.4 Enhancing our Communitys Lifestyle The lifestyle of the Wollongong community will be enhanced by having access to the natural, cultural and recreational assets of the area. A high quality lifestyle is dependent on safe access to places and facilities that promote health and wellbeing, and that allow and encourage people to pursue a range of leisure, recreational, learning and cultural experiences that they believe add value to their life. Both community and private assets contribute to the provision of these opportunities. • Natural assets include: fauna and flora in urban areas, bush land, wetlands, foreshores, the escarpment, creeks and water courses. • Cultural assets include cultural organisations and groups, European and Aboriginal heritage sites, libraries, performing arts centres, museums, art galleries, multicultural centres, and other cultural facilities such as community halls. It also includes such things as the village character of sites, local cultural and community activities, organisations and events. • Recreational assets include such things as sporting fields and clubs, playgrounds, public open space, swimming pools and leisure centres. The continual improvement of these assets and services, in both the private and public sectors will enable the city to respond to the changing lifestyle requirements of its community. At the same time these improvements will extend opportunities to those who have previously experienced difficulty in accessing these facilities. Many local communities are active in social and cultural events, activities and organisations which play a vital role in enhancing their quality of life, social wellbeing and diversity of opportunity. Wollongong Council will encourage community capacity building projects and celebrate our cultural diversity and creativity. 37
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 4.4 Innovative City The Innovative City strategy theme covers the two vision statements of: Supporting and Developing the Regional Economy and Embracing Creativity and Cultural Identity. An innovative city is one that has a vibrant and growing economy, is developing new opportunities, creating wealth and generating new jobs. It is a city that also places an emphasis on culture, creativity and ongoing learning. Wollongong aims to become a strong regional business hub and a centre for culture and creative endeavour.INNOVATIVE CITY Vision Statements Sub Themes Some Key Actions (2)Supporting and Wollongong will have a - Ensuring a sustainable - Economic developmentdeveloping the flourishing and economy strategyregional sustainable economy - Increasing local - Business developmenteconomy with an increasing employment opportunities - Investment attraction number of employment opportunities - Building a diversified - City centre retail and developed in the local economy commercial development government area. - Encouraging emerging - Innovation Campus industries - Port Development - Increasing investment - Education and training -Developing skills - Tourism strategy - Boosting innovation and - Creative Industries technology Plan - Developing green jobs - Development of - Environmental industries environmental industriesEmbracing Wollongong will be a - Developing the cultural - Cultural Plancreativity and vibrant, contemporary precinct - Creative Industries Plancultural identity local government area - Improving urban design - Learning city initiatives which protects, - Encouraging creativity and , - Cultural Facilities Plan enhances and celebrates diversity, identity - Public Art Policy inclusiveness, creativity - Developing the creative and originality. industries Note: Key activities are illustrative of the type of actions that are included in each policy theme 4.4.1 Supporting and Developing the Regional Economy Wollongong will have a flourishing and sustainable economy with an increasing number of employment opportunities developed in the local government area. Regional economic development is fundamental to Wollongong’s future. Future sustainable employment opportunities are dependent on the creation of a strong and vibrant local economy. The region will be influenced by national and international economic trends, changing technologies and shifting market opportunities. Opportunities in the regional economy will arise through the continued development of high value added manufacturing and the encouragement of emerging service industries. 38
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Wollongong will build a new economic base through diversification of its localeconomy.The development of investment, business and jobs will require both hard andsoft infrastructure.Hard infrastructure refers to physical infrastructure including transport,communication and buildings. Soft infrastructure includes access to venturecapital and investment in people through skills development.A key issue for a sustainable future is the expansion of the number of jobs inthe city centre and encouragement of new employment opportunities in theother urban centres in the LGA. It will be important to ensure a faster rate ofjob growth to absorb an expanding workforce, to reduce commuting toSydney and to ensure that long term unemployment rates decline.It will be important that Wollongong extends its role as the “regional capital”.The areas with the greatest capacity to deliver growth in jobs are in theservices sector. These include: business services (including ICT), retail,hospitality, health and community services, education, creative industries,tourism and environmental services. However manufacturing will also stillremain important to the region.Achieving future employment growth will require actions by a range oforganisations and stakeholders in both the private sector and the publicsector. Job growth will come from a variety of areas: the expansion of existingbusiness and organisations; the attraction of new businesses or organisationsinto Wollongong; and new businesses that form in response to populationgrowth and identified new service and product needs.Several major long term projects will have important impacts on futureemployment.The Innovation Campus is forecast to attract up to 3,000 persons when theCampus is fully developed over a 10-15 year period. The development of acontainer terminal at Port Kembla has been forecast to create 1,500 jobs inport related functions, in expanded local manufacturing and in newbusinesses establishing in the Illawarra. The expansion of health servicesand the Health Precinct in West Crown Street will generate more jobs in theCity Centre.The development of skills through education and training and the creation ofemployment opportunities for young people are also major issues.In the knowledge economy, skills development is fundamental. An activeapproach to education and training will be required to ensure that theworkforce has the necessary professional and trade skills to support thesenew activities. At the same time there is a need to ensure that we are able toretain skilled young people and professionals by offering them theopportunities that a growing economy provides. The growth challenge will involve: diversifying the regional economy to broaden its base; ensuring metals and engineering companies can develop broader markets; consolidating the CBD as a centre for services including retail, entertainment and creative industries; developing the health precinct; developing new activities including environmental industries and ensuring that the region is seen as an attractive place to live, work and play. 39
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054.4.2 Embracing Creativity and Cultural Identity Wollongong will be a vibrant, contemporary local government area which protects, enhances and celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, creativity and originality. Wollongong will have a vibrant, cultural precinct with a well resourced and lively cultural infrastructure (including the Art Gallery, Performing Arts Centre, and Entertainment Centre) that makes it the creative heart of the Illawarra region. The city has a rich history of diversity and innovation and is in the process of establishing itself as a centre for creativity in the international arena. The city has a significant arts education and training sector which includes the University of Wollongong Creative Arts Faculty; the Universitys Innovation Campus; North Wollongong TAFE; the Conservatorium of Music; the Performing Arts High School; 313 Wollongong City Employment and Training (WCET) Centre; Wollongong West TAFE; and Future World. The city has made connections between creativity and technology and continues to position itself as a City of Innovation. The city will integrate urban design and public art that reflects and celebrates local stories, experiences and aspirations, across precincts in the LGA. Wollongong’s unique cultural and social heritage is an asset to protect and promote as an integral part of the citys identity. Wollongong will continue to encourage local communities to express and celebrate their creativity, identity and place, through organisations, activities, services and funding support. Wollongong will continue to celebrate the diversity of its culture through community festivals and events. In 2003 84.9 per cent of Wollongong residents said they believed that: "A vibrant and diverse cultural life is important to a growing city". However, only 57.8 per cent of residents thought that: "compared to other cities Ive been to, Wollongong has vibrant cultural life "Wollongong City Council, 2003 Community Survey. IRIS Research Limited, May 2003 An audit of the citys existing cultural facilities shows that in order for Wollongong to take up a place in the world (both economically and creatively), further investment in its creative industries and cultural infrastructure is needed. Creative industry investment can: create jobs, attract inward investment, retain skilled young people in all fields, increase urban amenity, attract cultural tourism, and showcase Wollongong as centre of excellence. Wollongong will embrace creative industries as an essential part of sustainable development within a contemporary knowledge economy. This will include initiatives to encourage the development of new creative businesses and training for young people. Council will work collaboratively with community organisations, the education sector and individuals in Wollongong to build social capital through cultural expression, cultural development projects and the growth of cultural organisations. 40
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 4.5 Connected City Improvements in transport and communication are a fundamental part of Wollongong’s future. A connected city is one that plans and integrates all its transport modes (for moving people and goods) to ensure an efficient, safe and clean transport system that links all the key areas of the region. These include the key activity areas of the Central City, the beaches, regional centres in the North and South of the LGA, the university, tourism facilities, employment precincts and community facilities. In the long term, Wollongong has the opportunity to reduce reliance on cars and develop more flexible public transport options. Wollongong will continue to have an industrial role and has the opportunity to expand in port related activities. This pattern of development will require integrated freight planning (sea, rail, road), development of new infrastructure and traffic management. A connected city also has high quality telecommunications that provide speedy access to digital information.CONNECTED CITY Some Key Vision Statement (2) Sub Themes ActivitiesFacilitating and Wollongong will have a well- - Integrated transport - Integratedintegrating planned, coordinated and - Safe, affordable, convenient transport planningmovement clean transport system that public transport - Transport links the City to Sydney, to - Improving roads infrastructure other regional centres and that provides access to all - Providing parking - Rail upgrades relevant localities within the - Freight interchanges local government area in a - Encouraging safe, convenient and cycling/walking affordable mannerAccess to high Wollongong will have a high - Improving - Telecommunicspeed quality telecommunications telecommunications ations servicescommunication links network, which provides fast - Ensuring access to high - Broadband links for business and the speed broadband access community to the digital world. Note: Key activities are illustrative of the type of actions that are included in each policy theme 41
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054.5.1 Facilitating and Integrating Movement Wollongong will have a well-planned, coordinated and clean transport system that provides access to all relevant localities of the local government area in a safe, convenient and affordable manner. The transport system refers to public and private transport and the hard and soft infrastructure that facilitates the movement of goods and people. The hard infrastructure comprises physical infrastructure including roads, rail and parking facilities. It also includes the soft infrastructure (such as safety systems, transport marketing, transport management systems) that ensures a well operated transport system. Wollongong will have a well planned transport system that makes it a fully Connected City. This will require appropriate land use planning, traffic planning and the development of infrastructure including the upgrade of rail and road systems and transport and freight interchanges. The promotion of public transport, cycling and walking together with the implementation of new technologies, which provide non polluting public transport, will contribute to cleaner transport for Wollongong. 4.5.2 Access to High Speed Telecommunications Wollongong will have access to high speed telecommunication networks. A Connected City has good telecommunications, including broadband links into business and residential areas, which provide the foundation for information flows and for the efficient operation of businesses. Telecommunications are the “transport channels” for information and the foundation for knowledge based activities, now and in the future. Wollongong will ensure that it has access to high quality communications infrastructure and high speed broadband access throughout the city. 42
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 4.6 Inclusive City An Inclusive City places a major emphasis on access and equity. An Inclusive City is one where there is active engagement between local government and the community and a strong sense of participation and partnership. Wollongong will strive to be an Inclusive City in all its dimensions.INCLUSIVE CITY Vision Statements Sub Themes Some Key Activities (2)Access, equity, Wollongong will be a local - Ensuring accessibility - Community servicesutility government area that will be to services - Social Community Plan accessible on all levels to the - Maintaining - Cultural Plan whole community. In the future, affordability of services Wollongong will consider access, equity and utility in all that it does - Promoting cultural and strives to achieve. understanding - Action on social issuesCouncil and Wollongong will have an involved - Providing Leadership - City governancecommunity community working in partnership - Partnering with the - Business partnershipspartnership in city with an accessible, responsive community - Government interactiongovernance and accountable Council that - Ensuring Council is: - Community engagement provides dynamic and proactive leadership to the local government accessible, responsive - Advocacy area. and accountable - Encouraging active community participation Note: Key activities are illustrative of the type of actions that are included in each policy theme 4.6.1 Access Equity and Utility Wollongong will be a local government area that will be accessible on all levels to the whole community. In the future, Wollongong will consider access, equity and utility in all that it does and strives to achieve. Access and equity is multi-dimensional. It can be considered in terms of: physical issues, including the built form, location and transport; cultural issues, including cultural appropriateness and language; economic issues, including affordability of services; social issues, including access to services by marginalised social groups and community safety. Utility means services and infrastructure will be developed in response to the needs of the community. Services and facilities will be planned in such a way that: they are available in locations that are convenient; they are accessible to a wide segment of the community and they are supported by a range of transport choices. 43
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20054.6.2 Council and Community Partnership in City Governance Wollongong will have an involved community working in partnership with an accessible, responsive and accountable Council that provides dynamic and proactive leadership to the local government area. Partnerships Future approaches need to be based on participation and partnerships. A strong partnership approach between Council and the whole community will provide a foundation for better planning, improved leadership and better outcomes. It will achieve this by encouraging all members of the community to actively participate and to take ownership of decisions. A thriving and innovative local government area will be developed through this partnership, where the community and Council (both Councillors and staff) work together on strategic projects that will shape Wollongong’s future. This partnership approach will: create a more dynamic community; allow for a more detailed consideration of major social, environmental and economic issues; encourage a more informed community; and will ensure greater involvement in the implementation of future visions for the region and for the communities that make up Wollongong. Partnerships are about involving local communities, businesses, the voluntary sector and government organisations in a big picture approach to problem solving, and it’s about making things happen rather than waiting for others to do things for you. Partnerships and inclusiveness also need to be part of the way different divisions of the Council work with each other, because planning for sustainability involves bringing together knowledge and expertise from many different sources. Staff working groups are needed to ensure that the expertise across the whole organisation can be captured to support the building of a responsive and effective organisation. In summary, an accessible, responsive, and accountable Council shares information and knowledge, seeks community inputs, takes these inputs seriously and is transparent in decision making. Improved participation will ensure a better understanding of the communitys requirements across the full range of services and activities. It will result in better services, facilities and programs for everyone and, in turn, lead to greater community wellbeing and stronger social capital. Community participation is an important element of a sustainable future. Partnership will also involve Council working in collaboration with business and business groups on major issues affecting the economic development prospects of the Wollongong. This partnership model will also involve Council interacting with all tiers of government and taking a strong community advocacy approach on issues that affect the future of Wollongong. 44
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005GovernanceCouncil needs to listen to and engage its communities and act in a way thatis:• Responsive and customer focused – setting in place processes for assessing satisfaction, being responsive, and serving people’s needs;• Empowering – strengthening the ability of communities to control and take responsibility for their own destiny, by engaging in partnerships with a range of communities;• Equitable – protecting community rights and ensuring that the needs of the many are met before the wants of a few. Ensuring that current and future generations are treated equitably; and• Accountable – taking responsibility for actions, measuring performance and ensuring public information is available.These are the foundations for a new approach. 45
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20055 Realising our Future 5.1 Visions into Action5.1.1 Setting Directions The Futures Plan is a 20 year vision for the future of Wollongong. It outlines the community’s aspirations and sets the directions for policy across a wide range of categories. It aims to secure a better future for Wollongong, one that is based on the principles of sustainability. The Plan provides an overall direction for the region and is underpinned by a whole series of strategies and initiatives that are directed at achieving sustainable outcomes. This is how the visions are translated into actions and concrete outcomes. The next chapters outline the key strategies and their components under each of the city vision themes. Progress is well underway in a number of major areas of policy, for example in environment policies and programs and in planning for a revitalised Central City Area. The Futures Plan will help guide Council’s long term strategic plans and Corporate Plan. It will also impact on the various planning instruments (Local Environmental Plan and Development Control Plans) which influence the future shape of Wollongong and its communities. It will also provide a foundation for action by other tiers of government and other organisations. The Futures Plan is a living plan, and performance will be tracked and monitored on a regular basis, with adjustments being made to take account of changed circumstances and emerging opportunities.5.1.2 Taking Action The Plan, along with the research and analysis that has been undertaken, provides a strong foundation for seeking support from government. It also provides a basis for regional cooperation and partnering on key issues. A number of elements run through the Plan, which were initially identified in the community research conducted by IRIS.27 These elements are recognition of the natural environmental and the current lifestyle advantages of Wollongong and a need to encourage economic development and job growth. Other key concerns include Council issues, CBD development, crime and safety and urban development issues. A number of areas were identified in the community survey as priorities for the application of Council resources. These were: environmental protection and control; local communities – roads and footpaths, beautification of streets, recreation and sports facilities; economic development, CBD revitalisation and tourism development.28 Wollongong’s future is based around an active quadruple bottom line approach that takes account of the economic, environment, social and governance elements. This has been reflected in the thinking that has been part of the Wollongong Futures Project.27 Community Values Survey, June 2002, Illawarra Regional Information Service [IRIS] Pii-iii28 Community Values Survey, June 2002, Illawarra Regional Information Service [IRIS] P v 46
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 While the Wollongong Futures Project has as its genesis the need to examine land use issues and to update the Wollongong Local Environment Plan (LEP), its consultative processes have been focused on the type of city and region that the community wants. The key to the future is translating these vision statements into actions. Fully realising Wollongong’s long term growth potential requires a more active role to be played by Council on economic, environment and social development issues both within the Wollongong LGA and within the broader Illawarra and South Coast context. This involves the active strategies outlined in this report, together with appropriate land use policies and the development of strategic infrastructure. Sustained action that delivers real results for the city is fundamental. This will only be achieved if Wollongong takes a long term approach to shaping the future. However Council on its own will not be able to deliver these outcomes. It will require positive involvement by business, government and other major stakeholders in the city. The longer term outlook for Wollongong is strongly positive. Provided that action is taken to capitalise on new opportunities and to deal with key constraints, the visions and aspirations outlined in this plan will be realised. 5.2 Key Roles5.2.1 Council The Wollongong Futures Plan is a visionary document providing broad future strategic direction for the City. It sets out the communitys shared vision and provides direction to ensure planning and resource allocation work toward sustainable outcomes. The Plan outlines the way we all want Wollongong to develop in the next 20 years, and as such is a significant strategic document for Wollongong City Council. The Futures Plan will form part of Council’s planning framework. As part of this integrated framework, it will guide some of the other detailed strategies, plans and actions that are implemented by Council and other initiatives by key stakeholders. The Local Environment Plan (LEP) is the statutory planning tool that guides Councils key land use planning decisions across the city. The new LEP will be shaped by the vision for Wollongong developed through the Futures Process. Indeed Wollongong Futures was created as part of a comprehensive process to assist the development of the new LEP. Similarly, Councils Corporate Plan will contain directions derived from the Wollongong Futures Plan. Councils Annual Management Plan identifies key initiatives and services to be delivered over the financial year, including specific funding and resource allocation. All of these documents are linked and will be guided by the directions set in the Wollongong Futures Plan. They contain the actions that Council will pursue in order to realise the vision of a sustainable future for Wollongong. The relationships between Councils plans are illustrated below. 47
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 The following diagram shows where the Futures Plan sits within the framework of Council strategies and programs. Council has a role across a number of key areas of policy which shape Wollongong’s long term future. These include: • Planning – implementing planning policies including the Local Environment Plan (LEP) which covers the LGA and Development Control Plans (DCPs) which affect specific locations. • Economic development – implementing policies and programs to ensure continued growth in the region. • Environment policies – managing the environment, resource use and resource impacts. • Service delivery – delivering a full range of local services to the community. • Advocacy - Council playing a role in influencing policies and actions of other tiers of government and to secure funding support for programs and initiatives.5.2.2 Partners Council has the capacity to shape and influence outcomes on a number of the key factors that affect Wollongong’s long term future. However it does not control all the policy levers and some of the major infrastructure issues are either not its direct responsibility or are beyond the capacity of a local council to fund. Some other issues are broader in their scope and require business involvement. There is a need for Council to partner with business and community groups and government at all levels to address the key development issues and some of the major constraints. 48
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 These major partners include: • Community - at a community level, partners include community leaders and community based organisations and groups. • Government - Commonwealth Government, the New South Wales Government and its agencies. These other tiers of government control major infrastructure, fund specific programs and services, or have the capacity to provide support for special local initiatives. • Business - these partners include industry organisations, local business leaders and investors. • Regional organisations in the Illawarra. • Education - within the education and training sector, it includes the University of Wollongong and Illawarra TAFE. • Employees - at an employee level it includes employees and their trade unions. Partnerships will take a number of forms including: coalitions of support on particular issues affecting Wollongong (the recent coalition formed to advance the proposal for the Container Port is a good example of this); government funding support for major local and regional initiatives, including infrastructure investment; participation in particular initiatives that are promoting the region; public/private partnerships in the delivery of new infrastructure or services; business/government/community involvement in environmental initiatives; and Council providing support for projects or initiatives of other groups. This partnership approach involves active engagement and ongoing communication between the parties. This also includes communication on outcomes and the performance on the Futures Plan. The implementation of major elements of the plan will require partnerships between Council, business and other key stakeholder groups. While the leadership of these coalitions will vary, it will be important for Council to play an active role at all times. An active advocacy and government relations program around economic development, planning, environmental and infrastructure issues is important to any long term success for the region.5.2.3 Community The Wollongong Futures Project has tapped into community opinion and involved a wide cross section of the community in shaping future directions for the local government area. A continuation of this active engagement and ongoing community support is fundamental to achieving the future outcomes. Wollongong City Council will keep the community informed on progress and establish mechanisms for ongoing monitoring of performance and to shape future new initiatives. Active community involvement will be a feature of these arrangements. Council and community partnership in city governance is a fundamental part of the Plan and the “Inclusive City” theme. 49
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20055.3 From Strategy to Outcomes The Wollongong Futures Plan outlines a long term vision for the region. As an umbrella document, it sets the vision and directions rather than including detailed implementation plans. Realising a vision requires taking a number of steps along the way. The futures process identified a number of outcomes that make up the visions and reviewed the actions required to realise them. Different actions require different time periods to realise outcomes. We have set three time periods: short term – 1-5 years, medium term – 6-10 years and long term - 10-20 years. The following chapters outline the major anticipated outcomes and actions under each of the four future city themes. This analysis recognises that a number of the actions required to realise the visions are already well underway, some are part of ongoing initiatives by Council, others are at the research and planning stages, and some are still on the drawing board. Some outcomes will be realised in the short-term, while others will require a medium to long-term horizon to achieve. These differences in time horizons emphasise the umbrella nature of the Futures Plan and the need for a clear tracking of progress on specific activities. 50
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 6 Living City 6.1 Living City Overview Wollongong has the opportunity to become a Living City in all its dimensions. A series of outcomes have been developed around each of the visions.LIVING CITYVision Outcomes1. Developing a progressive and quality Wollongong will foster thriving urban Outcome 1.1 Wollongong will be a localurban environment for people areas with innovative development government area that actively that is based on principles of design demonstrates excellence in urban design. excellence and that contributes to a Outcome 1.2 Wollongong will deliver best practice land management and planning to strong sense of place throughout meet environmental, economic, social and the local government area. community needs.2. Valuing and sustaining the environment Wollongong will enjoy a natural Outcome 2.1 Wollongong will be a leader environment that is protected and in the sustainable use of resources and enhanced, and a human environment that is designed and will champion waste avoidance, developed in harmony with nature. resource recovery, energy efficiency and water Outcome 2.2 Wollongongs industry, business and community will have a greater awareness, understanding and implement initiatives to improve air quality within the region Outcome 2.3: Wollongong will be a leader in the management and protection of its natural land systems and waterways.3. Developing strong local communities Wollongong’s future vision includes Outcome 3.1 The people of Wollongong the development of vibrant local will freely participate in a safe environment. communities and cultures.4. Enhancing our community’s lifestyle The lifestyle of the Wollongong Outcome 4.1 Wollongong will continue to community will be influenced by the develop and deliver recreational and natural, cultural and recreational health services to assist residents to have active and healthy lifestyles assets of the area 51
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 6.2 Developing a Progressive and Quality Urban Environment Vision 1. Developing a progressive and quality urban environment for people Outcome 1.1 Wollongong will be a local government area that actively demonstrates excellence in urban design Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Revitalisation of the New LEP WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► city centre and Develop DCP WCC DIPNR ◙ ► other urban areas in ►◩ for Central City Wollongong Area City Centre WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► ◩ Revitalisation Illawarra Strategy Business (includes City Chamber Centre Master Plan) Access & WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► ◩ Movement State Rail Strategy and Wollongong Rail Station transit Interchange & Precinct Study Develop a WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► ◩ Public Domain Manual for all main streets and the city centre Develop Town WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► ◩ Centre DCPs Develop and WCC Illawarra ◙ ► ► ◩ implement Town Business Centre Chamber Strategies Local Businesses Implement a WCC Developers ◙ ► ► ◩ Section 94 Contribution Plan Protect local WCC Building owners ► ► ► heritage and Developers cultural distinctiveness in urban design in city and precincts Projects and WCC Retailers ► ► ► events to bring Hotels residents and Venues visitors to City Centre Planned approach Sustainability WCC Environment ◙ ► ► ◩ to future Strategy update DIPNR Groups urban growth based and Neighbourhood on sustainability implementation Committees Development of a West Dapto WCC DIPNR Dept of Premier ◙ new community at Development West Dapto based Plan on sustainability West Dapto WCC DIPNR ► ► principles Land Release DIPNR and Developers Development◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 52
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 1. Developing a progressive and quality urban environment for people Outcome 1.1 Wollongong will be a local government area that actively demonstrates excellence in urban design Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage Public Art WCC Businesses ◙ ► ► ◩ integration of urban Program in City Developers design and public Centre Artists art Employ local WCC Artists ► ► artists and Creative companies as businesses part of the Public Art Policy Encourage design Develop and WCC DIPNR ◙ ►◩ that is high quality implement a Dept of and eco friendly design awards Environment program and Conservation(D EC) Design public WCC Local ◙ ► ► ◩ built elements in Communities consultation with Artists community and local artists to enhance identity and distinctiveness Engage local WCC Local ► ► ► ◩ communities Communities and artists in Neighbourhood creating distinct Committees identities and Artists sense of place in local precincts. Incorporate urban Urban design WCC DIPNR ► ► ► ◩ design input into all input on all Developers planning strategies strategic planning projects Urban design WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► expertise provided by Design Review Panel Encourage research Develop WCC Illawarra TAFE ◙ ► into impacts of research Uni of Illawarra Area change in the built program Wollongong Health Service environment on (UOW) (IAHS) community health Implement a Develop WCC Environment ◙ planned approach management DIPNR Groups to open space strategy management Redevelop public Develop Department Residents ◙ ► housing estates partnerships for of Housing Community with resident redevelopment (DOH) organisations involvement WCC◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 53
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 1. Developing a progressive and quality urban environment for people Outcome 1.2 Wollongong will deliver best practice land management and planning to meet environmental, economic, social and community needs. Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Maintaining Implement Department Environment ► ► ► biodiversity and management of Groups plans for managing impacts Environment recreational of facilities on tourist and and protected areas educational Conservatio facilities within n (DEC) and adjacent to National protected areas Parks to minimise possible WCC impacts on biodiversity. Maintaining a Review and WCC Environment ◙ ► ► “green” urban implement Groups guidelines for Neighbourhood environment tree Committees preservation and vegetation removal, in accordance with the principles of sustainability. Ensure Promote WCC DIPNR ► ► ► sustainability sustainability DEC Department of principles in the principles in the Energy, Utilities design and design and and construction of construction of Sustainability Wollongongs built Wollongong’s (DEUS) form built form. Sydney Water . Property Council of Australia Master Builders Association Housing Industry Association Developers Engage with WCC DIPNR ► ► ► other tiers of DEC Department of government Energy, Utilities and the building and industry to Sustainability achieve better (DEUS) performance Sydney Water with regard to Property Council of Australia ESD in building Master Builders development Association Housing Industry Association Creating distinct Engage local WCC Residents ► ► ► and diverse businesses and Neighbourhood Committees communities residents to help Businesses shape local precinct identities◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 54
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 6.3 Valuing and Sustaining the Environment Vision 2 Valuing and sustaining the environment Outcome 2.1 Wollongong will be a leader in the sustainable use of resources and will champion waste avoidance, resource recovery, energy efficiency and water Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Reduce Resource Develop, WCC DIPNR ◙ ► ► Usage implement and DEC Businesses Community track policies Environment designed to Groups reduce resource consumption greenhouse gases & water consumption Incorporate WCC DEC ◙ ► ► Green Environment Groups Procurement into general purchasing policy Implementation WCC DEC ► ► ►◩ of Council Environment Energy Plan Groups Implement WCC DEC ► ► ► Council Water Environment Audit Groups Ensure WCC Architects ► ► ► sustainability Builders principles are applied in the design of new Council Facilities Assess the WCC Architects ► ► ► capacity for Builders conversion of existing facilities for alterative uses Update Update and WCC DEC ◙ ► ►◩ Sustainability Implement Local Environment Policies Action 21 Plan Groups Update Council WCC DEC ◙ ► ►◩ Sustainability Environment Policy Groups◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 55
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Vision 2 Valuing and sustaining the environmentOutcome 2.1 Wollongong will be a leader in the sustainable use of resources and willchampion waste avoidance, resource recovery, energy efficiency and waterLiving City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20Strategies Initiatives years years yearsImprove Waste Maintain, WCC DEC ► ► ►Management expand and Environment Groups improve waste management and recycling programs. Maximise WCC DEC ► ► ► resource Wollongong recovery by Businesses industry, business and the community within Wollongong. Research and WCC DEC ◙ investigate alternatives to land fillPromote Advance and WCC Environment ◙ ►Sustainable promote a DEC GroupsDevelopment Schools greater understanding of ecologically sustainable development and its relationship to waste through planning controls Increase WCC Businesses ◙ ► awareness and DEC Industry improved Associations practice of waste prevention and avoidance by industry, businesses and Consumers within Wollongong Continue WCC Environment ► ►◩ Sustainable Groups Program Projects Fund participants 56
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Continue the WCC Environment ► ►◩ Environment Groups Program Fund to support Participants projects including: Sustainable House Package, Sustainability Education, water quality and biodiversity rehabilitation packages◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review Vision 2 Valuing and sustaining the environment Outcome 2.1 Wollongong will be a leader in the sustainable use of resources and will champion waste avoidance, resource recovery, energy efficiency and water Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage New Encourage WCC Uni of ◙ ► Technologies research into DEC Wollongong new Environment technologies Groups and Businesses encourage, Industry promote and Associations support the uptake of environmentally friendly alternative technologies within Wollongong. Encourage best WCC Residents ► ► practice Sydney Businesses sewerage Water management systems in locations where a reticulated system isnt available Track Performance Prepare Annual WCC Environment ◙ ► ► State of the Groups Environment Reports◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 57
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 2 Valuing and sustaining the environment Outcome 2.2 Wollongongs industry, business and community will have a greater awareness, understanding and implement initiatives to improve air quality within the region Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Improve Air Quality Implement and WCC City Rail ► ► monitor DIPNR Public transport the Roads and operators environmental Traffic Commonwealth initiatives under Authority Government the (RTA) Industry "Moving Associations Together" Strategy Advocate DEC WCC ◙ ► Improvement of Businesses standards Industry in air quality Associations regulation and monitoring Work with DEC Industry ► ► industry, Bluescope Associations community and Steel Businesses government to WCC Environment improve air Groups quality in the region Energy Use Encourage the WCC Commonwealth ► ► uptake of DEC Government Renewable Industry energy and Associations increase its Businesses availability and Environment use in Groups Wollongong. Implement WCC DEC ► ► Council Energy Environment Plan Groups Encourage an WCC DEC ◙ investigation of Australian Environment the Greenhouse Groups potential of Office (AGO) implementing a carbon credits trading system for the region.◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 58
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005Vision 2 Valuing and sustaining the environmentOutcome 2.3: Wollongong will be a leader in the management and protection of its natural landsystems and waterways.Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20Strategies Initiatives years years yearsManaging Coastal Develop and WCC Environment ◙ ► ► implement DEC GroupsAreas Coastal Residents management plansManaging the Implementation WCC Uni of ◙ ► ► of Escarpment DEC WollongongEscarpment management National Environment polices Parks Groups ResidentsManaging Implementation WCC Environment ► ► ► of lakes and DEC GroupsWaterways waterways policy Residents Lake Illawarra StrategyEncouraging Update of WCC Sydney ◙ Ecological Universitybiodiversity Footprint Report Develop and WCC DIPNR ◙ ► deliver incentives DEC Environment to the community Groups to conserve Residents biodiversity.Protecting Land and Lead the WCC DIPNR ◙ ►Waterways DEC Land owners protection of Environment Wollongongs Groups natural land NSW Fisheries systems and waterways through agency and community partnerships, information dissemination and activities. Undertake a WCC Environment ◙ feasibility study Groups into the raising of funds to pay landowners to be ‘conservation landlords’Managing Water Develop, Sydney DIPNR ◙ ► ►Resources Water Residents promote and DEC Environment implement WCC Groups strategies to improve the management and use of water resources to conserve biodiversity and meet environmental, social and community needs.Green Corridors Maintenance of DEC Sydney Water ◙ ► ► WCC DIPNR green corridors Environment between urban Groups 59
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 population centres◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 6.4 Developing Strong Local Communities Vision 3. Developing strong local communities Outcome 3.1 The people of Wollongong will freely participate in a safe environment. Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Reducing Crime Build WCC DIPNR ◙ ► partnerships with Safe Department of the community Community Community and relevant Action Team Services (DOCS) stakeholders to NSW Police Community reduce crime and Groups increase safety. Neighbourhood Committees Businesses Facilitate the WCC Department of ◙ ► development of a NSW Police Community Crime Services (DOCS) Prevention Community Strategy for our Groups region. Neighbourhood Committees Businesses Increase Safety Create a vibrant WCC City Centre ◙ ► city and NSW Police Wollongong suburban Crown Street Central environment Mall Management where the Management City centre community feels businesses safe and Suburbs comfortable in Local businesses public spaces Residents Neighborhood Committees Encourage after WCC City Centre ► ► dark activities in Crown Street businesses the City Centre Mall Management Wollongong Central Management Revitalise local Develop town WCC DIPNR ◙ ►◩ areas centres plans Local and DCPs Businesses Industry Associations Neighbourhood Committees Implement place WCC Residents ► ► making activities Local to enhance Businesses community Industry capacity and Associations ownership Neighbourhood Committees 60
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Work with local WCC Local ► ► communities Businesses and businesses Industry to implement Associations projects that Neighbourhood develop the Committees identity of local precincts◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 61
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 3. Developing strong local communities Outcome 3.1 The people of Wollongong will freely participate in a safe environment. Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Manage Local Develop and WCC DIPNR ◙ ►◩ Areas implement Local strategies and Businesses appropriate Industry place based Associations management Neighbourhood approaches to Committees improve the vitality of local areas. Promote diversity Promote and WCC Community ► ► and understanding support diverse Groups community Industry events , activities Associations and Media organisations to promote inclusiveness and tolerance◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 62
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 6.5 Enhancing our Community’s Lifestyle Vision 4. Enhancing our community’s lifestyle Outcome 4.1 Wollongong will continue to develop and deliver recreational, health, social and cultural services to assist residents to have active and healthy lifestyles Living City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Delivery of quality Provide cost WCC Sporting Clubs ► ► ► recreational efficient aquatic services facilities Provide cost WCC Sporting Clubs ► ► ► efficient leisure Community and sporting Groups facilities and programs Enhance Coastal WCC Sporting Clubs ► ► ► recreational use of management Community coastal environment plans Groups Beach Environment maintenance Groups and safety programs Enhance Development of WCC Environment ► ► ► recreational use of plan covering National Groups the Escarpment recreation use, Parks rehabilitation and education Provide innovative Provide WCC Youth ◙ ► programs for young innovative Schools Organisations people programs for TAFE Community young people organisations encompassing recreational ,cultural, educational and development opportunities Support for families Provide effective WCC Youth ► ► ► school holiday Organisations programs Community organisations Provide family WCC Community ► ► ► and children’s organisations programs Residents Support for older Develop and WCC Community ◙ ► ►◩ persons implement organisations programs with Residents partner agencies◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 63
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 7 Innovative City 7.1 Innovative City Overview Wollongong is a “City of Innovation” and has the opportunity to establish itself as a vibrant and creative regional economy. A series of outcomes have been developed around these vision statementsINNOVATIVE CITYVision Outcomes5. Supporting and developing the Wollongong will have a flourishing Outcome 5.1 Wollongong will beregional economy and sustainable economy with an recognised for its visionary leadership and increasing number of employment strong economic focus. opportunities developed in the local Outcome 5.2: Wollongong will be government area. regarded as an attractive and favoured location for business investment in both existing and emerging industries which can deliver long term sustainable employment opportunities. Outcome 5.3 Wollongong will be the primary gateway to the south coast.6. Embracing creativity and cultural Wollongong will be a vibrant, Outcome 6.1: Wollongong willidentity contemporary local government area represent the cultural and creative which protects, enhances and heart of the Illawarra region - A vibrant celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, and interesting place to live, work, play creativity and originality. and visit. 64
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 7.2 Supporting the Regional Economy Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.1 Wollongong will be recognised for its visionary leadership and strong economic focus. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Implement a Develop and WCC DSRD ◙ implement a 10 ►◩ sustainable economic Illawarra Illawarra year sustainable Business strategy for the region. Region economic strategy Chamber covering Organisation Australian Wollongong and of Councils Industry Group its broader region DIPNR Illawarra Economic Development Board South Coast Trade and Labour Council Illawarra ACC Ensure sufficient Establish and WCC Illawarra ACC ◙ ► expand the Office Illawarra resources are of Economic Business available for Development Chamber Economic Australian development Industry Group Provide leadership WCC Council to WCC Illawarra Regional ◙ ► be active in on economic issues Development existing impacting on regional alliances Board Wollongong and the and mechanisms University of Illawarra Region (formal and Wollongong informal) Illawarra between businesses, Business government and Chamber other regional Australian organisations. Industry Group South Coast Trades and Labour Council DIPNR DSRD Assess future Conduct a study WCC University of ◙ on future DIPNR economic Wollongong infrastructure DSRD infrastructure needs needs to support Illawarra more diverse Business economic Chamber development Australian Industry Group South Coast Trades and Labour Council◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 65
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.1 Wollongong will be recognised for its visionary leadership and strong economic focus Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage growth in Develop and WCC University of ◙ implement key DSRD Wollongong ►◩ activity and employment sector strategy Illawarra ACC (UOW) in the services sector. plans. Illawarra Health Service Sectors include: Illawarra Business Knowledge Chamber economy – Australian telecommunication s, information Industry Group technology, creative industries , Illawarra TAFE finance, business IRDB services, education, environmental services In-person services - health and aged care, community services, and retail, Secure government Conduct a study of WCC University of ◙ ► future economic Illawarra support for key development Regional Wollongong economic requirements Development Illawarra Business development projects Board Chamber Develop and Illawarra ACC in the Illawarra Region implement an Australian Industry ongoing and Group targeted South Coast government relations program Trades and Labour Council Implement the WCC ABAF ► Cultural Industries ►◩ Audit Arts Managers DSRD IACC University of Wollongong (UOW) Illawarra Performing Arts Centre (IPAC) Develop Port Kembla Provide ongoing Port Authority Illawarra Regional ◙ ► support for the WCC development of a DIPNR Development container port at Board University Port Kembla of Wollongong Develop a master Illawarra Business plan for the Port Chamber Precinct Australian Industry Planning of Group required South Coast infrastructure Trades and Labour Council◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 66
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.2: Wollongong will be regarded as an attractive and favoured location for business investment in both existing and emerging industries which can deliver long term sustainable employment opportunities. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage a Implement WCC University of ◙ ► ◩ diversification of the business Department Wollongong development of State (UOW existing economic programs for and Regional Illawarra base as a means of emerging Developmen Business creating new and sectors t (DSRD ) Chamber sustainable Illawarra TAFE employment Australian opportunities. Industry Group Provide support University WCC ► ► ►◩ for the of Illawarra Innovation Wollongong Business Campus (UOW) Chamber Australian Industry Group Implement an WCC Illawarra ◙ ► ► ◩ Economic Business Development Chamber Strategy for the City Centre Central City businesses Encourage the Illawarra WCC ◙ ► ► ◩ development of Business IACC new knowledge Chamber based Illawarra businesses Small through Business mentoring and Centre training programs Develop new Investigate WCC DSRD ◙ approaches to alternatives to DIPNR traditional planning for zoning including business activity in "employment all areas of the zones" which LGA. incorporate industry, commercial, retail and residential areas.◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 67
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.2: Wollongong will be regarded as an attractive and favoured location for business investment in both existing and emerging industries which can deliver long term sustainable employment opportunities. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Ensure an Investigate re- DIPNR Land owners ◙ ►◩ adequate supply of zoning of WCC Developers employment and “brown field” industrial land at a sites reasonable cost. Establishment of WCC DSRD ◙ ►◩ employment DIPNR zones in newly developed areas. Development WCC Department of ◙ ►◩ and Infrastructure, implementation Planning and of employment Natural strategies for Resources local town (DIPNR) centres. Support the WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ development of Business local Chamber neighbourhood Illawarra ACC small businesses Illawarra Small Business Centre Encourage the Provide support Department Illawarra ◙ ►◩ growth of small and for market of State Business development, and Regional Chamber medium sized including export Developmen Illawarra TAFE enterprises (SMEs) programs t (DSRD) Australian in the region Austrade Industry Group AusIndustry Illawarra ACC Illawarra Small WCC Business Centre Provide support Department Illawarra ◙ ►◩ for business of State Business development and Regional Chamber programs for Developmen Illawarra TAFE SMEs t (DSRD) Australian Austrade Industry Group AusIndustry Illawarra ACC Illawarra Small WCC Business Centre Austrade AusIndustry Provide Illawarra Department of ◙ ► incubator Small State and services to Business Regional support growth Centre Development and resource WCC (DSRD) sharing Illawarra ACC◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 68
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.2: Wollongong will be regarded as an attractive and favoured location for business investment in both existing and emerging industries which can deliver long term sustainable employment opportunities. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Develop skills to Develop and WCC Illawarra ◙ ► ► implement a Department of Business support economic regional skills Education Chamber growth strategy and Training Australian Industry Group University of Wollongong (UOW) Illawarra TAFE TAFE NSW Ensure that Provide support University of DIPNR ◙ ► Wollongong is to UOW’s Illawarra Wollongong attractive to research Innovation Business and development Campus initiative (UOW) Chamber based companies Australian and organisations WCC Industry Group DSRD Promote University of Illawarra ◙ ► Wollongong’s Business Wollongong business assets Chamber including quality (UOW) Australian of life indicators WCC Industry Group DSRD Ensure appropriate Assessment of WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ needs of DSRD Business relocation incentives individual Chamber are available. companies AIG Active WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ management and DSRD Business facilitation of Chamber investment AIG inquiries Promote Implement WCC University of ◙ ► Wollongong as a marketing and DSRD Wollongong location for higher promotion (UOW value added programs Illawarra manufacturing, a targeted at these Business regional services sectors and Chamber centre and a centre emphasising Australian for innovation and creative city Industry Group knowledge based aspects. activities Implement WCC University of ◙ ► investment DSRD Wollongong facilitation (UOW programs Illawarra Business Chamber Australian Industry Group◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 69
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.2: Wollongong will be regarded as an attractive and favoured location for business investment in both existing and emerging industries which can deliver long term sustainable employment opportunities. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Actively market Develop and WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ Wollongong as a implement a DSRD Business business location marketing Chamber strategy Australian Industry Group Develop new WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ promotional DSRD Business materials that Chamber include creative Australian city indicators Industry Group and advantages (diversity, education and lifestyle) Implement an WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ external DSRD Business business Chamber contacts program Australian Industry Group Maintain Review of WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ City of Innovation campaign Tourism Business image Wollongong Chamber campaign Develop updated WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ strategy Tourism Business Wollongong Chamber Implement WCC Illawarra ◙ ►◩ campaign Tourism Business Wollongong Chamber Track performance of Continue IRIS DSRD ◙ ► business in the business activity WCC Illawarra region surveys Business Chamber Australian Industry Group IRIS DSRD ◙ ► Commission WCC Illawarra special surveys Business Chamber Australian Industry Group◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 70
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 5 Supporting and developing the regional economy Outcome 5.3: Wollongong will be the primary gateway to the South Coast. Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Develop a new Conduct a WCC Illawarra Region ◙ ►◩ regional tourism review of Tourism of Councils strategy. regional tourism Wollongong Tourism NSW Regional Tourist related Councils business Develop a new WCC Illawarra Region ◙ ►◩ 5 year regional Tourism of Councils strategy Wollongong Tourism NSW Regional Councils Promote Continue WCC Tourism Sector ► ► Wollongong tourism Council and Tourism Tourism NSW activity industry Wollongong promotion and partnership initiatives Promote WCC Tourism Sector ► ► regional events Tourism Tourism NSW and activities, to Wollongong potential visitors Develop a WCC Tourism Sector ► ► stronger Tourism Tourism NSW integration of the Wollongong marketing of tourism products covering events, natural environment and heritage. Promote the WCC Tourism Sector ► ► “Viva La Gong” Tourism Tourism NSW festival as a Wollongong showcase of cultural diversity and creative innovation Develop new Investigate WCC Illawarra ◙ ► ► tourism initiatives tourism potential Tourism Regional based around the of Wollongong Information distinctive heritage public art trail, Service (IRIS) and culture, heritage walking Tourism NSW including cultural trails and diversity and the cultural sites , unique natural through a environment (eco- feasibility study tourism.) Develop a WCC Tourism NSW ◙ ► ► marketing Tourism program of new Wollongong initiatives Ensure adequate Conduct a WCC Tourism Sector ◙ ► regional tourism review of future Tourism Illawarra infrastructure infrastructure Wollongong Business needs in the Chamber tourism sector IRIS Tourism NSW◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 71
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 7.3 Embracing Creativity and Cultural Identity Culture and creativity are an important part of Wollongong as an innovative city. There are major opportunities to build on current cultural strengths through a combination of new programs and the development of partnerships between business and cultural community. Vision 6 Embracing creativity and cultural identity Outcome 6.1 Wollongong will represent the cultural and creative heart of the Illawarra region - A vibrant and interesting place to live, work, play and visit Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage a strong Implement the WCC Illawarra ► ►◩ commitment to arts Cultural Plan Performing Arts and cultural activity Centre (IPAC) and provide Wollongong Art continued support Gallery University of Wollongong (UOW) Regional arts organisations TAFE WCET Provide support WCC Illawarra ► ►◩ for existing Performing Arts cultural facilities, Centre (IPAC) programs and Wollongong Art services Gallery Regional arts organisations Develop Implement a WCC Regional Arts ◙ ► partnerships program to ABAF Organisations between business facilitate local (Australian Arts Managers and arts partnerships Business Group organisations Arts University of Develop skills Foundation) Wollongong and capacity of (UOW) local arts Illawarra organisations. Business Chamber Maximise access to Provide support WCC Arts Managers ◙ ► cultural to diverse Regional Group opportunities, community Arts Viva la Gong through appropriate events (incl Viva Organisation Illawarra Migrant and affordable la Gong) s Resource community events. Centre Illawarra Aboriginal Corporation◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 72
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 6 Embracing creativity and cultural identity Outcome 6.1 Wollongong will represent the cultural and creative heart of the Illawarra region - A vibrant and interesting place to live, work, play and visit Innovative City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Support community Implement WCC Arts Managers ◙ ► cultural community Regional Group development cultural Arts Illawarra Migrant projects that Development Organisation Resource involve communities projects. s Centre reflecting and Illawarra interpreting Aboriginal their own Corporation environments Implement place Regional Arts ◙ ► making and Organisations public art Arts Managers projects Group Advance community Implement skills WCC University of ◙ skills development Regional Wollongong in the organisation programs Arts (UOW) of events, public art Organisation Illawarra TAFE place making and s CCD NSW community cultural development. Improve knowledge Promote WCC NSW Ethnic ◙ ► of cultural diversity networks of Communities Council in the community cultural officers Illawarra Migrant to work Resource with people Centre from different Illawarra cultural Aboriginal backgrounds Corporation Illawarra Interagency Regional Arts Organisations Arts Managers Group CCD NSW Develop the WCC Regional Arts ◙ ► cultural officer Organisations program Arts Managers Group CCD NSW Support existing WCC Regional Arts ◙ ► art workers and Organisations their networks Arts Managers Group CCD NSW◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 73
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 6 Embracing creativity and cultural identity Outcome 6.1 Wollongong will represent the cultural and creative heart of the Illawarra region - A vibrant and interesting place to live, work, play and visit Innovative City Major Initiatives Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies years years years Promote the City as a Develop an WCC Tourism NSW ◙ ► destination offering a integrated cultural Tourism IPAC range of cultural marketing strategy Wollongong Wollongong Art experiences Gallery Secure industry Wollongong support Entertainment Centre Implement the Regional Arts strategy organisations Viva la Gong Festival Develop new WCC Tourism NSW ◙ ► audience Tourism IPAC opportunities Wollongong Wollongong Art Gallery Wollongong Entertainment Centre Encourage the Implement a public WCC Developers ◙ ► integration of urban art program Regional arts design and public art organisations University of Wollongong (UOW) TAFE Investigate WCC Developers ◙ ► funding from Sect Regional arts 94 Contributions organisations University of Wollongong (UOW) TAFE Implement place WCC Developers ◙ ► making projects Regional arts organisations University of Wollongong (UOW) TAFE Maintain, protect WCC Regional arts and promote organisations public art and sites of cultural heritage Provide support to Develop and WCC University of ◙ emerging artists and implement a Wollongong cultural businesses support program, (UOW) including an Illawarra TAFE assessment of Regional arts cultural industry organisations incubators IACC Identify future cultural Assess future WCC ABAF ◙ infrastructure needs cultural (Australian infrastructure Business Arts needs Foundation) Undertake a WCC NSW Ministry of ◙ cultural facilities the Arts needs assessment Arts Managers IACC◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 74
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 8 Connected City 8.1 Connected City Overview Currently most people living in Wollongong rely on cars as the major form of transport. There are many communities where public transport is not adequate, and this often has impact on young people, women, older people and people with disabilities. For some members of the community affordability of transport is a major issue. Wollongong has the opportunity to establish itself as a connected city based on facilitating and integrating movement and developing communications. A series of outcomes have been developed around these vision statements.CONNECTED CITYVision Outcomes7. Facilitating and integrating Wollongong will have a well-planned, Outcome 7.1: Wollongong will have amovement coordinated and clean transport system sound awareness, acceptance and that links the City to Sydney, to other utilisation of alternative modes of regional centres and that provides access transport to private motor vehicle use as to all relevant localities within the local they travel to work, education, retail and government area in a safe, convenient leisure activities. Alternatives such as and affordable manner public transport, cycling, walking and car pooling Outcome 7.2: Wollongong will enjoy a transport and access network that is adaptable to changing community needs, economic opportunities and technological innovation.8. Access to high speed Wollongong will have a high quality Outcome 8.1 Wollongong will be acommunication links telecommunications network, which connected city that is linked with a high provides fast links for business and the quality telecommunications. community to the digital world. 75
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 7 Facilitating and integrating movement Outcome 7.1: Wollongong will have a sound awareness, acceptance and utilisation of alternative modes of transport to private motor vehicle use as they travel to work, education, retail and leisure activities. Alternatives such as public transport, cycling, walking and car pooling Connected City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Improved integration Implement WCC DIPNR ◙ of land use and additional Ministry of transport planning transport Transport planning Implement the Assessment of WCC NSW Roads ◙ ►◩ “Moving Together" progress with Ministry of and Traffic Strategy focusing the strategy Transport Authority on attractive Continued Department (RTA) alternatives to implementation of Environment private vehicle use of the strategy and and the integration Conservation of transport modes. (DEC) DIPNR Encourage the use Development of WCC RTA ◙ ►◩ of education and Ministry of DEC efficient and promotion Transport sustainable programs Department transport options Improve bus Support WCC RTA ◙ ► services improvements Bus Companies to current bus services and infrastructure to provide a "worlds best practice" bus network. Review of car Assess parking WCC ◙ ► parking provision supply as sustainable transport options are developed and infrastructure provided Council Vehicle Wollongong City WCC ◙ ► Fleet management Council will maintain its fleet in accordance with the principles of economic and environmental sustainability Encourage Council Wollongong City WCC ► ► staff to use Council alternative transport will lead by modes. example by encouraging staff to use eco friendly alternatives to the car which may include buses, trains and bicycles◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 76
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 7 Facilitating and integrating movement Outcome 7.2: Wollongong will enjoy a transport and access network that is adaptable to changing community needs, economic opportunities and technological innovation. Connected City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Assess future Review of future WCC NSW Roads and ◙ transport demand transport Department Traffic Authority requirements in of requirements for a (RTA); line with urban changing population Infrastructure , planning and development Planning and and an ageing Natural population Resources (DIPNR) Investigate WCC NSW Roads and ◙ innovative Ministry of Traffic Authority Transport models for (RTA); improved Department of transport Infrastructure , (including mini Planning and buses, light rail, Natural community Resources transport ) as (DIPNR) part of its Local Agenda 21 Plan Develop an efficient Lobby for the WCC Illawarra ◙ and integrated freight provision of an Business Chamber transport system that efficient and Australian maximizes integrated freight Industry Group sustainable transport system Port Kembla outcomes. Corporation DIPNR Secure improved Improve liaison WCC NSW Roads and ◙ transport funding. with government Illawarra Traffic Authority departments to Business (RTA); facilitate the most Chamber appropriate Australian future allocation Industry Department of of transport Group Infrastructure , funding Planning and Natural Resources (DIPNR) Continue Continue support WCC Community ► ► Community for community Groups transport Transport arrangements◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy reviewVision 8 Access to high speed telecommunications linksOutcome 8.1 Wollongong will be a connected city linked with a high qualitytelecommunications.Connected City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20Strategies Initiatives years years yearsEnsure Quality Review of WCC Illawarra ◙Telecommunications Future Telstra Business Requirements Country ChamberInfrastructure Wide Uni of Wollongong◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 77
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 20059 Inclusive City 9.1 Inclusive City Overview Wollongong has the opportunity to establish itself an Inclusive city through pursuing principles of access and equity in the delivery of services and through a strong Council and community partnership in governance. Vision Outcomes 9. Access, equity, utility Wollongong will be a local Outcome 9.1: Wollongong government area that will will be a community that be accessible on all levels offers opportunity for to the whole community. In people of all ages and the future. Wollongong will promotes cultural awareness consider access, equity and inclusiveness. and utility in all that it does and strives to achieve. 10. Council and Wollongong will have an Outcome 10.1 Wollongong community partnership in involved community city governance working in partnership with will have an involved an accessible, responsive community that is working in and accountable Council partnership with an that provides dynamic and proactive leadership to the accessible Council that local government area. provides leadership to the local government area. 78
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 9.2 Access Equity Utility Vision 9 Access, equity, utility Outcome 9.1 Wollongong will be a community that offers opportunity for people of all ages and promotes cultural awareness and inclusiveness. Inclusive City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Measuring quality Encourage WCC Healthy Cities ◙ ► of life relevant Illawarra Area Illawarra agencies to Health Illawarra Division adopt best Service of General practice "life (IAHS) Practice (IDGP) style measures" Department of to quantify and Aging, Disability track liveability and Home Care and quality of (DADHC) life throughout the region. Provide equitable Housing WCC Department of ◙ ► ► access to Strategy: Department Community housing, healthcare Develop and of Housing Services and education implement an (DoH) (DOCS) affordable NGOs housing strategy Health Strategy: WCC Illawarra Area ◙ ► ► Develop Department Health partnerships of Service (IAHS) with Community NGOs relevant Services stakeholders to (DOCS) ensure all members of the community have access to affordable healthcare Education WCC Department of ◙ ► ► Strategy: Department Community Develop of Education Services partnerships and Training (DOCS) with (DET) NGOs Stakeholders to ensure equitable access to educational opportunities Provide equitable Develop WCC Community ◙ ► ► access to partnerships Department organisations community and with of cultural services Stakeholders to Community ensure Services community (DOCS) access to community and cultural services◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 79
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 9 Access, equity, utility Outcome 9.1 Wollongong will be a community that offers opportunity for people of all ages and promotes cultural awareness and inclusiveness. Inclusive City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Encourage lifetime Advance and WCC TAFE NSW ◙ ► ► learning in all promote Department Illawarra TAFE sections of the community of Education University of community access to and Training Wollongong information and (DET) (UOW) life long learning opportunities. Ensure access WCC Illawarra TAFE ► ► to education Department University of and retraining of Education Wollongong opportunities for and Training (UOW) persons with (DET) socio- economic disadvantage. Build business Develop and WCC Illawarra ◙ ► partnerships on maintain IACC Business social and cultural partnerships Chamber projects with the Australian business sector Industry Group to fund and contribute to a broader range of community projects and activities Support the WCC Illawarra ◙ ► business Business volunteers Chamber program Australian Industry Group◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review Vision 9 Access, equity, utility Outcome 9.1 Wollongong will be a city that offers prosperity and opportunity for people of all ages and encourages and promotes cultural awareness and inclusiveness. Inclusive City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Target Groups Info To be inserted by Community Services Indigenous WCC Community and Culture People with WCC Disability CALD Groups WCC Employment for Young Persons◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 80
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 9 Access, equity, utility Outcome 9.1 Wollongong will be a city that offers prosperity and opportunity for people of all ages and encourages and promotes cultural awareness and inclusiveness. Inclusive City Major Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies Initiatives years years years Planning ahead for Undertake WCC Illawarra ◙ ► an ageing research to Department Retirement Trust population assess the of Ageing (IRT) impact of ageing Disability Department of on future and Home Community services and Care Services facility needs in (DADHC) (DOCS) the LGA Local Government and Assess the Shires impact of ageing Association of on future NSW Council revenue and expenditure Develop Actively work in WCC Department of ◙ ► partnerships on partnership with Department Housing (DoH) health and social health and of Department of policy issues community Community Ageing service sectors Services Disability and in policy (DOCS) Home Care development, Illawarra Area (DADHC) research, Health Healthy Cities service delivery Service Illawarra; NGOs and advocacy. (IAHS) University of Wollongong (UOW) Illawarra Division of General Practice (IDGP) Assess future Use WCC Illawarra Area ◙ needs of a changing demographic Department Health Service population and social of (IAHS); research data to Infrastructur Department of underpin e Planning Community collaborative and Natural Services projects that Resources (DOCS) plan for the (DIPNR) Department of future education, social and health Housing (DoH); needs of the Community population organisations (eg. Anglicare & the Salvation Army)◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 81
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 9.3 Council and Community Partnership Vision 10 Council and community partnership in city governance Outcome 10.1 Wollongong will have an involved community that is working in partnership with an accessible Council that provides leadership to the local government area. Inclusive City Major Initiatives Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies years years years Enhance inter Internal WCC ◙ ► ► department coordination and planning cooperation within Council and consultation with the community. Establish inter- WCC ◙ ► ► departmental project management teams Use place based WCC Neighbourhood ◙ ► ► project Committees management Ensure improved Finalise, implement WCC ◙ customer service and track the Customer Service and responsiveness Policy to ensure improved customer service, quality assurance and response times Improve community Encourage the WCC Neighbourhood ◙ ► access to provision of more Committees points for information information dissemination in city centre and neighbourhoods. Develop and WCC ◙ ► implement clear guidelines so all information in public domain is readily accessible Implement a more Implement best WCC Neighbourhood ◙ ► active approach to practice community Committees engagement Community community strategies that have organisations involvement been developed by WCC Implement a more Establish working WCC Neighbourhood ◙ ► ► systematic parties with all Committees relevant Community approach to stakeholders prior organisations stakeholder to major decisions. Industry consultation associations Advertise for WCC Neighbourhood ◙ ► ► representatives on Committees project reference Community groups organisations Industry associations◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 82
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Vision 10 Council and community partnership in city governance Outcome 10.1 Wollongong will have an involved community that is working in partnership with an accessible Council that provides leadership to the local government area. Inclusive City Major Initiatives Lead Role Partners 1-5 6-10 11-20 Strategies years years years Improve community Develop a WCC ◙ ► ► ◩ understanding of communication Local program to explain Governme local government local governments and decision nt & Shires role, decision processes. processes and Associatio services n (LGSA) Introduce Develop systematic WCC ◙ ► ► systematic processes for project evaluation evaluation and data tracking processes Implement systems WCC ◙ ► ► across all Council units Improve systems for Develop in house WCC ◙ ► ► recording and systems and resources to tracking community capture and ideas. support new community ideas and initiatives Improve Develop WCC ◙ ► ► communication with communication strategy the community and Develop and WCC ◙ ► ► key stakeholders implement communication plans for all major initiatives◙ =completed in time period ► = ongoing implementation ◩= policy review 83
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 200510 The Way Forward 10.1 Acting on Our Future The Wollongong Futures Plan provides a vision and directions for Wollongong’s long term development. It sets a framework for the many strategies and programs that will be implemented by Council and other stakeholders in the region. The Plan provides the confidence to move forward on those actions that will contribute to the creation of a vibrant and sustainable city. The visions will not be realised by Council operating in isolation. As we have seen it will require the creation of strong and ongoing partnerships with government, business and the community. 10.2 Measuring Performance10.2.1 Tracking Progress Fully realising the visions will also require sustained and planned activities over the medium to long term. In this respect it will be important to measure progress against major objectives. The tracking of progress, the measurement of achievements and regular review of individual strategies will ensure that the Plan remains relevant in the future. This active management will also ensure that the Future Plan can be adjusted to reflect changes in circumstances and new opportunities. This tracking will involve establishing measures for each of the 4 Future City Themes and reviewing the core strategies on a regular basis. The medium term nature of many of the initiatives means that some of the individual strategies would be reviewed every 5 years. Others may be examined more frequently.10.2.2 Reviewing and Reporting Council would prepare a report each year on progress on the Futures Plan. The full Futures Plan would be reviewed every 3 years.10.2.3 Measures The following table outlines some of the key indicators that can be used to measure some of the major outcomes that are linked to specific visions. It is recognised that all individual Council programs have their own performance indicators. Some of these more detailed indicators would also be used to measure aspects of performance against the Futures Plan. 84
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Strategy Outcome Measures Visions Themes Developing a Wollongong will foster thriving urban areas with Value of investment in quality development progressive and quality innovative development that is based on principles of design excellence and that contributes to a strong urban environment for Major projects completed sense of place throughout the local government people area. Wollongong’s future vision includes the Local plans completed Developing local development of vibrant local communities and Growth in local employment cultures. communities Local safety indicators Housing trends – new houses and renovations Wollongong will enjoy a natural environment that is Improvement in environment indicators – air, water,Living City protected and enhanced, and a human environment soil, flora and fauna that is designed and developed in harmony with nature. Expenditure on environmental rehabilitation Valuing and sustaining Extent of area of rehabilitation of Escarpment, riparian the environment corridors, remnant vegetation, coast dunes and Lake Illawarra Rates of waste disposal and recycling by households and business The lifestyle of the Wollongong community will be Community health indicators Enhancing our influenced by the natural, cultural and recreational Measures of facilities and program use community’s lifestyle assets of the area Expenditure on programs 85
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Strategy Outcome Measures Visions Themes Growth in total jobs Wollongong will have a flourishing and sustainable economy with an increasing number of employment Level of business investment opportunities developed in the local government Trends in the level of business activity Supporting and area. Growth in business numbers and employment in developing the regional priority sectors including: business services, economy environmental industries, tourism education, health services, information technology. Level of research and development activityInnovative City Level of unemployment Wollongong will be a vibrant, contemporary local Expenditure on cultural programs government area which protects, enhances and celebrates diversity, inclusiveness, creativity and Numbers participating in cultural programs originality. Numbers participating in events Embracing creativity and cultural identity Number of arts organisations Number of artists working in the city Number of approvals for street activities (events, festivals, markets, concerts) 86
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005 Strategy Outcome Measures Visions Themes Wollongong will have a well-planned, Indicators of use of public transport coordinated and clean transport system that links the City to Sydney, to other regional Investment in transport infrastructure Facilitating and integrating centres and that provides access to all relevantConnected City movement and improved localities within the local government area in a Percentage of city users accessing the city by public telecommunications safe, convenient and affordable manner transport, walking, bicycle and private vehicle Perceptions of city users about access in and around the city Wollongong will have a high quality Investment in telecommunications infrastructure telecommunications network, which provides fast links for business and the community to the digital world. Indicators of use of telecommunications Proportion and location of businesses, homes and schools with Internet access Wollongong will be a local government area that Resources for social programs will be accessible on all levels to the whole community. In the future, Wollongong will Level of take-up of programs Access, equity, utility consider access, equity and utility in all that it Trends in indicators of social disadvantage, including does and strives to achieve. poverty, unemployment, health, education Wollongong will have an involved community Number of consultation programs implementedInclusive City working in partnership with an accessible, responsive and accountable Council that Number of participants in consultation programs Council and community provides dynamic and proactive leadership to partnership in city the local government area. Community satisfaction with consultation governance Community satisfaction with Council governance 87
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 200510.3 Securing Support The success of the Futures Plan is dependent on securing wide support from the community and stakeholders for its core visions and its key elements. Obtaining this support will require communicating the plan to the community and seeking endorsements from key stakeholders. In particular a dialogue will need to be established with key business organisations, community groups and government agencies. It also requires continuing the engagement with the community that was established during the investigation stage of the Futures Process. As part of this process of securing support, a series of Futures Forums focused on the core strategic issues will be conducted.10.4 Managing the Plan Wollongong City Council will establish internal processes for managing the implementation of the Futures Plan. It will also establish an ongoing advisory group to assist with tracking performance. This group would involve key stakeholders from the private and public sectors and representatives of Council. This is part of a commitment to ensuring that Wollongong is able to secure its future as a prosperous sustainable city. 88
  • Wollongong Futures Draft Strategy Report 2005References Baseline Study of Demographic and Economic Trends in the Illawarra and South Coast Regions, IRIS Research August 2003 Cultural Policy Framework and Cultural Plan 1998-2003, Wollongong City Council November 1998 Economic Analysis of the Wollongong Central City Area Volume 1 Report, Buchan Consulting December 2004 Establishment of the Office of Illawarra Technology Discussion Paper Illawarra Business Chamber August 2003 Identification of Headline Planning Issues and Trends in Illawarra and the South Coast Region, IRIS Research July 2003 Illawarra and South Coast Retail Centres Study, February 2004 Illawarra and South Coast Employment Lands Audit, SGS Economics and Planning May 2004 Illawarra Region Housing Supply and Demand Study, Macroplan Australia February 2004 Illawarra Region Retail Study, Hill PDA August 2004 Overview of the Wollongong Economy, Leyshon Consulting June 2002 Planning for a Better Future, Metropolitan Strategy Discussion Paper, Sydney Greater Metropolitan Region, DIPNR September 2004 Retail Overview Report - Wollongong City Centre/Crown Street Mall Leyshon Consulting June 2002 Report of the Port Kembla Container Terminal Taskforce Port Kembla Container Task Force February 2003 Shaping our Cities – Planning Strategy for Greater Metropolitan Region of Sydney, www.metrostrategy.nsw.gov.au Strategic Regional Plan 2001 – 2004 Illawarra Area Consultative Committee 2001 Social Community Plan 02/03-05/06, Wollongong City Council. State of the Environment Report 02-03, Wollongong City Council Trends and Drivers, Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources June, 2004 Tourism Wollongong Action Plan 2002 – 2005 Tourism Wollongong 2002 Wollongong City Structure Plan: Economic Analysis Hill PDA Property Consulting August 2003 Wollongong Cultural Industries Audit Guppy & Associates and National Economics May 2000 Wollongong Economic Development Roadmap, Buchan Consulting November 2003 Wollongong Futures: A Vision for Wollongong 2022, Wollongong City Council 2003 Wollongong Futures: Abridged Project Outline, Wollongong City Council 2002 Wollongong Futures: Community, Thematic and Council Visioning Workshops – Results and Analysis CSIRO 2003 Wollongong Futures: Community Values Survey IRIS Research June 2002 Wollongong Futures: Regional Economy Overview Leyshon Consulting June 2002 Wollongong Retail Centres Study, Hill PDA April 2004 89